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  • The transformative power of the thumbnail image: Media logistics and infrastructural aesthetics

    Velux Foundation; Thylstrup, Nanna; Teilmann-Lock, Stina (University of Illinois at Chicago University Library, 2017-10-01)
    Thumbnail images are discreet, yet central navigational tools in increasingly complex visual information environments. Indeed, without thumbnail images there would be no image search: they are an inherent part of the information architecture of most digital information platforms. Yet, how might we understand the role of the thumbnail as an attention technology in the digital economy? And what kind of aesthetic does it produce? This paper examines the legal negotiations of the thumbnail image and the ensuing decision to conceptualize the thumbnail as a functional image against the cultural history of visual attention technologies and the aesthetics of their connective function. Such an endeavour, we propose, allows us to understand and appreciate the significant digital economy and particular aesthetic of the thumbnail image despite its apparent subtlety.
  • Application of Ranganathan's Laws to the Web

    Noruzi, Alireza (2006-09-05)
    This paper analyzes the Web and raises a significant question: "Does the Web save the time of the users?" This question is analyzed in the context of Five Laws of the Web. What do these laws mean? The laws are meant to be elemental, to convey a deep understanding and capture the essential meaning of the World Wide Web. These laws may seem simplistic, but in fact they express a simple, crystal-clear vision of what the Web ought to be. Moreover, we intend to echo the simplicity of Ranganathan's Five Laws of Library Science which inspired them.
  • Application of Ranganathan's Laws to the Web

    Noruzi, Alireza (2006-09-05)
    This paper analyzes the Web and raises a significant question: "Does the Web save the time of the users?" This question is analyzed in the context of Five Laws of the Web. What do these laws mean? The laws are meant to be elemental, to convey a deep understanding and capture the essential meaning of the World Wide Web. These laws may seem simplistic, but in fact they express a simple, crystal-clear vision of what the Web ought to be. Moreover, we intend to echo the simplicity of Ranganathan's Five Laws of Library Science which inspired them.
  • A Simulation of the Structure of the World-Wide Web

    Sociological Research Online; ISSN 1360-7804; Boudourides, Moses; Antypas, Gerasimos (http://www.epress.ac.uk, 2002-05-02)
    In this paper we are presenting a simple simulation of the Internet World-Wide Web, where one observes the appearance of web pages belonging to different web sites, covering a number of different thematic topics and possessing links to other web pages. The goal of our simulation is to reproduce the form of the observed World-Wide Web and of its growth, using a small number of simple assumptions. In our simulation, existing web pages may generate new ones as follows: First, each web page is equipped with a topic concerning its contents. Second, links between web pages are established according to common topics. Next, new web pages may be randomly generated and subsequently they might be equipped with a topic and be assigned to web sites. By repeated iterations of these rules, our simulation appears to exhibit the observed structure of the World-Wide Web and, in particular, a power law type of growth. In order to visualise the network of web pages, we have followed N. Gilbert's (1997) methodology of scientometric simulation, assuming that web pages can be represented by points in the plane. Furthermore, the simulated graph is found to possess the property of small worlds, as it is the case with a large number of other complex networks.
  • Time for the Law to take internet geolocation technologies seriously

    Svantesson, Dan (ePublications@bond, 2012-01-01)
    There are longstanding assumptions that the Internet operates independently of geographical location, and that it is borderless in nature. After all, sending an e-mail to a person in the office next door is done in the same manner as sending the same e-mail to a person located on the other side of the planet. Similarly, visiting a local website is done in the same manner as visiting a foreign website. The important role these assumptions have played in Internet regulation, 1 as well as more broadly, should not be underestimated. In fact, it could be said that a significant part of the current thinking about matters falling within the scope of Internet regulation takes these assumptions as its point of departure. In particular, these assumptions have guided our thinking on the matters of when a court may exercise jurisdiction over Internet conduct, and which country’s law should govern Internet conduct.

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