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  • Linking to a 'new public': parallels with the principle of exhaustion

    Harvey, Nicola (Lunds universitet/Juridiska institutionen, 2015)
    The recent CJEU ruling in Nils Svensson and Others v Retreiver Sverige AB aims to establish a clear position on the legality of linking from a copyright perspective and to strike an appropriate balance between the protecting rights of IP owners while still respecting the free dissemination of content that uniquely defines the internet. To do so, the Court has established that linking does indeed fall under the right of ‘communication to the public’, but with the caveat that it will only constitute infringement if it reaches a ‘new public’ not contemplate by the rightholder. Numerous parallels might be drawn between this new, specific rule and the existing, more general principle of exhaustion of right under EU law. The purpose of this thesis then is to draw a comparison between the regulation of linking set down by the CJEU in Svensson and the principle of exhaustion, and to examine the implications of the apparent overlap between the two within the framework of EU copyright law more broadly.
  • Linking to a 'new public': parallels with the principle of exhaustion

    Harvey, Nicola (Lunds universitet/Juridiska institutionen, 2015)
    The recent CJEU ruling in Nils Svensson and Others v Retreiver Sverige AB aims to establish a clear position on the legality of linking from a copyright perspective and to strike an appropriate balance between the protecting rights of IP owners while still respecting the free dissemination of content that uniquely defines the internet. To do so, the Court has established that linking does indeed fall under the right of ‘communication to the public’, but with the caveat that it will only constitute infringement if it reaches a ‘new public’ not contemplate by the rightholder. Numerous parallels might be drawn between this new, specific rule and the existing, more general principle of exhaustion of right under EU law.<br> <br> The purpose of this thesis then is to draw a comparison between the regulation of linking set down by the CJEU in Svensson and the principle of exhaustion, and to examine the implications of the apparent overlap between the two within the framework of EU copyright law more broadly.
  • Toward a Cultural Framework of Internet Governance: Russia’s Great Power Identity and the Quest for a Multipolar Digital Order

    Budnitsky, Stanislav (ScholarlyCommons, 2020-04-01)
    CARGC Paper 13, “Toward a Cultural Framework of Internet Governance: Russia’s Great Power Identity and the Quest for a Multipolar Digital Order,” by CARGC Postdoctoral Fellow Stanislav Budnitsky was initially delivered as a CARGC Colloquium in 2018. As part of Budnitsky’s larger research project on the relationship between nationalism and global internet governance, CARGC Paper 13 considers the cultural logics underlying Russia’s global internet governance agenda. It argues that to understand Russia’s digital vision in the early twenty-first century and, by extension, the dynamics of global internet politics writ large, scholars must incorporate Russia’s historic self-identification as a great power into their analyses.
  • Multistakeholder Internet Governance?

    Dutton, William H. (World Bank, Washington, DC, 2016-01-14)
    Global debate over alternative approaches to governing the Internet has been wide
 ranging, but increasingly has pivoted around the wisdom of “multistakeholder
 governance.” This paper takes controversy around a multistakeholder versus an
 alternative multilateral approach as a focus for clarifying the changing context and
 significance of Internet governance. A critical perspective on this debate challenges some
 of the conventional wisdom marshaled around positions on the history and future of
 Internet governance. By providing an understanding of the dynamics of Internet
 governance, this paper seeks to illuminate and engage with issues that are of rising
 importance to the vitality of a global infrastructure that is becoming more central to
 economic and social development around the world. Based on the perspective developed
 in this paper, a multistakeholder process appears best suited for helping a widening array
 of actors, including multilateral organizations, to connect a worldwide ecology of choices
 that are governing the Internet.
  • Privacy Preserving Delegated Access Control in Public Clouds

    Mohamed Nabeel, Mohamed Yoosuf; Bertino, Elisa (Purdue University, 2014-08-01)
    Current approaches to enforce fine-grained access control on confidential data hosted in the cloud are based on finegrained encryption of the data. Under such approaches, data owners are in charge of encrypting the data before uploading them on the cloud and re-encrypting the data whenever user credentials change. Data owners thus incur high communication and computation costs. A better approach should delegate the enforcement of fine-grained access control to the cloud, so to minimize the overhead at the data owners, while assuring data confidentiality from the cloud. We propose an approach, based on two layers of encryption, that addresses such requirement. Under our approach, the data owner performs a coarse-grained encryption, whereas the cloud performs a fine-grained encryption on top of the owner encrypted data. A challenging issue is how to decompose access control policies (ACPs) such that the two layer encryption can be performed. We show that this problem is NP-complete and propose novel optimization algorithms. We utilize an efficient group key management scheme that supports expressive ACPs. Our system assures the confidentiality of the data and preserves the privacy of users from the cloud while delegating most of the access control enforcement to the cloud.

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