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  • Standardising Public Policy Documentation to Foster Collaboration Across Government Agencies

    National University of Ireland [Galway] (NUI Galway); Luis M. Camarinha-Matos; Hamideh Afsarmanesh; Rosanna Fornasiero; TC 5; WG 5.5; Adel Rezk, Mohamed; Aliyu, Mahmoud,; Bensta, Hatem; Ojo, Adegboyega (HAL CCSDSpringer International Publishing, 2017-09-18)
    Part 13: Digital Platforms
  • Les xarxes socials a la llum de la proposta de Reglament general de protecció de dades personals. Part u

    Antonio Troncoso (Universitat Oberta de Catalunya, 2013-06-01)
    <p>L’estudi analitza els tractaments de dades personals que duen a terme les empreses que presten serveis de xarxa social, tenint en compte el nou marc jurídic que comporta la proposta de Reglament general de protecció de dades personals de la Unió Europea, que la Comissió ha presentat el gener del 2012. L’estudi analitza a qui correspon la responsabilitat del tractament i l’aplicació de l’excepció de les activitats personals o domèstiques. S’hi examinen les dificultats per a aplicar la Directiva 95/46/CE a les corporacions internacionals que tenen la seu fora de la Unió Europea i la regulació que en aquest punt fa la proposta de Reglament general de protecció de dades personals. Igualment s’hi analitzen la informació, el consentiment de l’interessat per al tractament i per a les cessions, el principi de qualitat en el servei de xarxa social, la conservació de la informació, les mesures de seguretat i els drets de les persones, especialment el dret a l’oblit a internet a la llum de la proposta de Reglament general de protecció de dades personals.</p><p> </p>
  • Les xarxes socials a la llum de la proposta de Reglament general de protecció de dades personals. Part u

    Antonio Troncoso Reigada (Universitat Oberta de Catalunya, 2012-12-01)
    <p>L'estudi analitza els tractaments de dades personals que duen a terme les empreses que presten serveis de xarxa social, tenint en compte el nou marc jurídic que comporta la proposta de Reglament general de protecció de dades personals de la Unió Europea, que la Comissió ha presentat el gener del 2012. L'estudi analitza a qui correspon la responsabilitat del tractament i l'aplicació de l'excepció de les activitats personals o domèstiques. S'hi examinen les dificultats per a aplicar la Directiva 95/46/CE a les corporacions internacionals que tenen la seu fora de la Unió Europea i la regulació que en aquest punt fa la proposta de Reglament general de protecció de dades personals. Igualment s'hi analitzen la informació, el consentiment de l'interessat per al tractament i per a les cessions, el principi de qualitat en el servei de xarxa social, la conservació de la informació, les mesures de seguretat i els drets de les persones, especialment el dret a l'oblit a internet a la llum de la proposta de Reglament general de protecció de dades personals.</p>
  • Monitoring Employee E-Mail And Internet Usage: Avoiding The Omniscient Electronic Sweatshops: Insights From Europe.

    Rustad, Michael; Paulsson, Sandra R (NELLCO Legal Scholarship Repository, 2005-02-11)
    Much has been written about the widespread abusive practice of e-mail and Internet surveillance by employers in the American workplace. At present, U.S. employees in the private workplace have no constitutional, common law or statutory protection against abusive e-mail monitoring practices. In effect, American workers wave goodbye to their right to privacy as soon as they log onto their workplace computer because U.S. courts have formalistically applied a property rights regime to electronic surveillance of e-mail and Internet usage. This article uses the device of a hypothetical multi-national company to compare the diametrically opposed U.S. property-rights approach with the human rights approach to the European law of monitoring employees’ e-mail and Internet usage. Part I of this article reviews the case law and statutory developments for e-mail eavesdropping in the U.S. workplace. At present, American employers can lawfully intercept, search, and read any messages stored in workplace computers because courts have ruled that employees have no expectation of privacy in workplace electronic communications. Part II examines the European human rights tradition that accords workers a privacy expectation in the workplace. We explain the evolution of the human rights approach as a function of a wider social movement of worker’s co-determination in Europe. This part of the article next examines statutory and caselaw development from the Council of Europe and the European Union, as well as case studies of e-mail privacy rights in the United Kingdom and France, representing the common law and civil law traditions. In Part III, we propose that Congress enact the Electronic Monitoring Act of 2005, which is a proposed statute that will harmonize U.S. workplace monitoring law with European law. The model statute will provide U.S. workers with one-time written (?) supplemented by electronic notice of employer monitoring each time an employee boots up her computer. In addition, we propose civil remedies for non-compliance with the statute. The long-term impact of this model statute will be to appropriately balance the employers’ need to monitor with employee privacy. The long-term impact of the statute in the global economy will be to give American companies a competitive edge in cross-border transactions and reduce their liability costs. Our proposed Federal Electronic Monitoring Act is only the first step to harmonizing U.S. employment law with the rights that European employees have in an increasingly borderless global economy.
  • Tests of partnership: transatlantic cooperation in cyber security, internet governance, and data protection

    Stiftung Wissenschaft und Politik -SWP- Deutsches Institut für Internationale Politik und Sicherheit; Bendiek, Annegret (DEUBerlin, 2014-05-09)
    "Although relations are currently being tested, the transatlantic cyber partnership continues to stand on a solid normative and institutional foundation. Both sides agree on the fundamentals of Internet regulation. Both are of the conviction that universal accessibility to the Internet is extraordinarily useful not only for democratic decision-making and free markets but also for the future of the liberal democratic order. And both sides are united also in the search for effective means to limit malicious software, to fight crime, and to secure critical infrastructure. The controversy surrounding the NSA’s espionage activities exposed differences in what the United States and EU member countries consider to be the legitimate means and methods of reaching their common goals. It also revealed that they have different approaches to handling normative dissonance. Nevertheless, it certainly should not be misunderstood as an existential threat to the transatlantic partnership. Instead, transatlantic differences can and should be speedily resolved through political dialogue. Three major problem areas must be dealt with in this process: firstly the critical infrastructure protection in transatlantic cyber security, secondly the development of an inclusive multistakeholder-model in Internet governance and thirdly the adoption of the so-called umbrella agreement in data protection between the US and the EU." (author's abstract)

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