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dc.contributor.authorAttributed to either Herculius Governor of Illyriko (407 - 412 AD) or the Athenian Empress Eudocia (423 - 460 AD)
dc.date.accessioned2019-10-24T17:45:57Z
dc.date.available2019-10-24T17:45:57Z
dc.date.created2017-02-28 01:09
dc.date.issuedBuilt in the 5th century AD; Abandoned during the Slav invasion of 582 AD; Re-built as a three-aisled basilica in the 7th century AD; Re-built as an aisle-less, domed and cross-shaped church in the 11th or 12th century AD; damaged by fire and subsequently demolished in 1885
dc.identifieroai:oaicat.oclc.org:ASITESPHOTOIG_10313397758
dc.identifierThumbnail: http://media.artstor.net/imgstor/size2/asitesphoto/d0001/sites_photos_r20050559_as_8b_srgb.jpg
dc.identifierImage View: http://library.artstor.org/library/secure/ViewImages?fs=true&id=8CNaaSQwKSw0NzU8dSUURXorXXkhc11%2BdA%3D%3D
dc.identifierRanking: 43750
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12424/1002528
dc.description.abstract~A 40 meters long structure, containing four apses, was found within the confines of the Library of Hadrian. Dated from the 5th century AD, this is one of the earliest architectural evidence of Christianity in Athens. Parts of the foundations and the lower walls are still visible. The structure had a central square room with four conches that were accentuated by interior colonnades, an interior corridor that surrounded the room, a simple east-facing apse and a large narthex and atrium on the western side, suggesting it was a church. The walls were covered by marble revetment and the floors were decorated with mosaics. To the west, a broad hallway gave access to the structure through three doors. The building had a centralized plan that was distinctive to Churches of that period. The expensive materials that were used, suggest it was an imperial building, the founder of which was probably either Herculius Governor of Illyriko (408 - 412 AD) or the Athenian Empress Eudocia (423 - 460 AD). The building was probably abandoned during the Slav Invasion of 582 AD. In the 7th century AD a large three-aisled basilica was built over the central building of Hadrian's Library. The eastern apse and part of the colonnade of this building are still visible. In the 11th or 12th century AD, the basilica was replaced by an aisle-less, domed and cross-shaped church that was called Megali Panagia. The structure was damaged by fire and subsequently demolished in 1885.
dc.rightsFor uses beyond the ARTstor Terms and Conditions of Use, please contact Samuel Magal, Owner and Head Photographer at Samuel@sites-and-photos.com or Ronit Marco, Content Manager, at ronit@sites-and-photos.com; Website: www.sites-and-photos.com; Address: 84 Goshen Blvd. Kiryat Motzkin 26301 Israel; Tel.+972 4 6904 503; Fax +972 4 6904 855; Cell +972 544 799 642
dc.sourceImage and original data provided by Shmuel Magal, Sites and Photos
dc.titleTetraconch - Megali Panagia Chruch
dc.typeArchitecture and City Planning
ge.collectioncodeOAIDATA
ge.dataimportlabelOAI metadata object
ge.identifier.legacyglobethics:10635761
ge.identifier.permalinkhttps://www.globethics.net/gtl/10635761
ge.lastmodificationdate2017-02-28 01:09
ge.lastmodificationuseradmin@pointsoftware.ch (import)
ge.submissions0
ge.oai.exportid149001
ge.oai.repositoryid1470
ge.oai.setnameSetArtstorFull5
ge.oai.setspecSetArtstorFull5
ge.oai.streamid5
ge.setnameGlobeTheoLib
ge.setspecglobetheolib


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