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dc.contributor.authorClement, Megan Brianne
dc.date.accessioned2019-10-24T18:55:11Z
dc.date.available2019-10-24T18:55:11Z
dc.date.created2017-02-28 01:18
dc.date.issued2013-01-01
dc.identifieroai:qt5rg282p1
dc.identifieroai:qt5rg282p1
dc.identifierhttp://www.escholarship.org/uc/item/5rg282p1
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12424/1018523
dc.description.abstractIn John Milton’s Paradise Lost, the shadow symbol shows how the idea of God functions in a secular context. This symbol creates a parallel between worship and the creative act; both actions constitute efforts toward union through indirect communication. The persistence of this symbol--from works as old as Dante’s Divine Comedy to David Foster Wallace’s Infinite Jest of 1996--inspires further examination of how this parallel affects the way we view art.
dc.format.mediumapplication/pdf
dc.languageenglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publishereScholarship, University of California
dc.rightspublic
dc.sourceClement, Megan Brianne. (2013). Indirect Communication - The Shadow in Paradise Lost. Berkeley Undergraduate Journal, 26(1). Retrieved from: http://www.escholarship.org/uc/item/5rg282p1
dc.subjectMilton, Paradise Lost, Nietzsche, shadow, self, perceptual metaphor, author, reader
dc.subjectEnglish Literature, Critical Theory
dc.titleIndirect Communication - The Shadow in Paradise Lost
dc.typeArticle
ge.collectioncodeOAIDATA
ge.dataimportlabelOAI metadata object
ge.identifier.legacyglobethics:10655747
ge.identifier.permalinkhttps://www.globethics.net/gtl/10655747
ge.lastmodificationdate2017-02-28 01:18
ge.lastmodificationuseradmin@pointsoftware.ch (import)
ge.submissions0
ge.oai.exportid149001
ge.oai.repositoryid2701
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ge.setnameGlobeTheoLib
ge.setspecglobetheolib
ge.linkhttp://www.escholarship.org/uc/item/5rg282p1


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