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dc.contributor.authorKotrc, Benjamin
dc.contributor.authorKnoll, Andrew Herbert
dc.date.accessioned2019-10-24T19:21:04Z
dc.date.available2019-10-24T19:21:04Z
dc.date.created2017-02-28 01:24
dc.date.issued2017-02-21
dc.identifieroai:dash.harvard.edu:1/30403696
dc.identifierKotrc, Benjamin, and Andrew H. Knoll. 2015. “Morphospaces and Databases: Diatom Diversification through Time.” In Evolution of Lightweight Structures, ed. Christian Hamm: 17–37. doi:10.1007/978-94-017-9398-8_2.
dc.identifier978-94-017-9397-1
dc.identifier2211-0593
dc.identifierhttp://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:30403696
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12424/1032164
dc.description.abstractThe diversity of diatom form inspired Art Nouveau designers, an interest renewed by recent advances in biomimetic design. The fossil record provides two windows on the diversification history of diatoms: taxonomic diversity and morphological disparity. Marine planktonic diatom diversity is conventionally interpreted to describe a steep, almost monotonic rise through Cenozoic time. Subsampling methods used to address the associated rise in sampling reveal a more stationary pattern, with peak diversity in the mid-Cenozoic, whether by established methods or a new method (shareholder quorum subsampling, SQS). However, these methods may underestimate diversification if evenness decreases. In order to measure morphological disparity, we constructed an empirical morphospace based on discrete characters. Mean pairwise distance, a disparity metric describing the density of taxa in morphospace, shows little secular change , while convex hull volume, a measure of the extent of occupied morphospace, increases through time. Since we populated the morphospace with occurrence-based data, we can apply subsampling algorithms to these disparity metrics. Mean pairwise distance is largely unaffected, while the increase in occupied volume largely disappears under subsampling. Depending on the metric used, characterizing diatom diversification thus depends upon whether a literal reading of the fossil record or the use of subsampling algorithms is preferred. While this may prompt a reexamination of evolutionary narratives prominently featuring diatom diversification, changes in abundance and silicification may also affect the diatom’s biogeochemical importance. For biologically inspired design, an early exploration of diatom morphospace suggests that fossil forms should be considered alongside extant diatoms.
dc.description.abstractOrganismic and Evolutionary Biology
dc.languageen_US
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherSpringer Science + Business Media
dc.relation.ispartofdoi:10.1007/978-94-017-9398-8_2
dc.relation.ispartofBiologically-Inspired Systems
dc.rightsopen
dc.subjectMorphospaces, diatoms
dc.subjectDiversification
dc.subjectTaxonomic diversity
dc.subjectEvolution
dc.subjectBiodiversity, phylogeny, fossil record
dc.titleMorphospaces and Databases: Diatom Diversification through Time
dc.typeMonograph or Book
ge.collectioncodeOAIDATA
ge.dataimportlabelOAI metadata object
ge.identifier.legacyglobethics:10671170
ge.identifier.permalinkhttps://www.globethics.net/gtl/10671170
ge.lastmodificationdate2017-02-28 01:24
ge.lastmodificationuseradmin@pointsoftware.ch (import)
ge.submissions0
ge.oai.exportid149001
ge.oai.repositoryid5611
ge.oai.setnameFAS Scholarly Articles
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ge.setnameGlobeTheoLib
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ge.linkhttp://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:30403696


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