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dc.contributor.authorBrennan, Patrick McKinley
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-23T15:39:32Z
dc.date.available2019-09-23T15:39:32Z
dc.date.created2014-05-08 18:27
dc.date.issued2014-02-01
dc.identifieroai:works.bepress.com:patrick_brennan-1101
dc.identifierhttp://works.bepress.com/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1101&context=patrick_brennan
dc.identifierhttp://works.bepress.com/patrick_brennan/90
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12424/105599
dc.description.abstractThis paper originated as an invited contribution to a symposium on "Implementing Religious Law in Contemporary Nation-States: Definitions and Challenges," sponsored by the Robbins Collection, Berkeley Hall, Boalt Hall, U.C. Berkeley, February 2014. The symposium by design brought papers speaking variously from Christian, Jewish, and Muslim perspectives into conversation. My paper proposes that the Catholic tradition of reflection on human lawmaking, even in modern nation-states, must take as its starting point the God who rules His rational creatures through higher or eternal law, where the rational creature’s participation in that higher law is what is known as the natural law. Using the writings of St. Thomas Aquinas as a foundation, it argues that the divinely ordained remedy for the breakdown of human understanding and willing of the natural law is divine positive law, both of the Old Testament and the New Testament, as interpreted by the Church. It further notes that in the United States, this remedy is denied or severely circumscribed by modern political theory and the constitutional doctrine shaped by such theory. The paper concludes then, in Part IV, by considering: (1) the implications of the fact that religion is a component of justice, not, as it is increasingly (mis-)understood, a mere act of self-assertion; (2) some of the requirements of toleration as a disposition of modern states toward their citizens and of citizens toward their fellow citizens; (3) the impossibility of truly "sovereign" states; and (4) higher law's aim to unite human persons with the Divine persons.
dc.format.mediumapplication/pdf
dc.publisherSelectedWorks
dc.sourcePatrick McKinley Brennan
dc.subjectNew Testament
dc.subjectReligion Law
dc.subjectestablishment
dc.subjectpolitical liberalism
dc.subjectlaw of love
dc.subjecttoleration
dc.subjectJurisprudence
dc.subjectreligious law
dc.subjectby nature equal
dc.subjectCatholic Church
dc.subjecthuman law
dc.subjectnatural law
dc.subjectlawmaking
dc.subjectprudence sovereignty
dc.subjectjustice
dc.subjectReligion
dc.subjectConstitutional Law
dc.subjectOld Testament
dc.subjectHigher law
dc.subjectnatural rights
dc.subjectreligion
dc.titleImplementing Religious Law in Modern Nation-States: Reflections from the Catholic Tradition
dc.typetext
ge.collectioncodeCA
ge.dataimportlabelOAI metadata object
ge.identifier.legacyglobethics:5757269
ge.identifier.permalinkhttps://www.globethics.net/gel/5757269
ge.lastmodificationdate2014-09-18 23:10
ge.submissions0
ge.oai.exportid53
ge.oai.repositoryid552
ge.oai.streamid1
ge.setnameGlobeEthicsLib
ge.setnameGlobeTheoLib
ge.setspecglobeethicslib
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ge.linkhttp://works.bepress.com/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1101&context=patrick_brennan
ge.linkhttp://works.bepress.com/patrick_brennan/90


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