Asia Pacific Theological Seminary (APTS) is a cooperative ministry of the Assemblies of God national churches of Asia, Pacific Oceania, and the Assemblies of God World Missions-USA. Asia Pacific Theological Seminary Press is publishing the Asian Journal for Pentecostal Studies (AJPS). The journal seeks to provide a forum to encourage serious theological thinking and articulation by Pentecostals/Charismatics in Asia; to promote interaction among Asian Pentecostals/Charismatics and dialogue with other Christian traditions; to stimulate creative contextualization of the Christian faith; and to provide a means for Pentecostals/Charismatics to share their theological reflections.

News

The Globethics.net library contains articles of the Asian Journal for Pentecostal Studies (AJPS) as of vol. 1(1998) to current.

Recent Submissions

  • Asian Journal of Pentecostal Studies, 23, no. 2 (August 2020)

    ORU Library, Holy Spirit Research Center (Digital Showcase, 2020-08-01)
    The ASIAN JOURNAL OF PENTECOSTAL STUDIES is published twice per year (February and August) by the Faculty of Asia Pacific Theological Seminary, P.O. Box 377, Baguio City 2600, Philippines. The current and all past editions of the Journal can be downloaded free at www.aptspress.org. Views expressed in the Journal reflect those of the authors and are not necessarily the views of the Journal or the Asia Pacific Theological Seminary.
  • Asian Journal of Pentecostal Theology, 24, no. 2 (August 2021)

    ORU Library, Holy Spirit Research Center (Digital Showcase, 2021-08-01)
    Asian Journal of Pentecostal Studies ISSN 0118-8534 Vol. 24, No. 2 (February 2020) Editor David M. Johnson, DMiss Board of Reference: Wonsuk Ma (Korea), Simon Chan (Singapore), Roji T. George and Josfin Raj (India), Robert P. Menzies (Northern Asia), Sang Yun Lee (Korea), Jacqueline N. Grey (Australia), Edwardneil Benavidez (Philippines), Olga Zaprometova (Russia), David Singh (India/UK) Book Review Editor: Adrian P. Rosen, PhD. Editorial Committee: Frank McNelis (Senior Editor), Stuart Rochester, Rosemarie Daher Kowalski, Debbie Johnson, Joy Varnell, Catherine McGee, Jon Smith, and Kimberly Snider Layout Editor: Mil Santos The ASIAN JOURNAL OF PENTECOSTAL STUDIES is published twice per year (February and August) by the Faculty of Asia Pacific Theological Seminary, P.O. Box 377, Baguio City 2600, Philippines. The current and all past editions of the Journal can be downloaded free at www.aptspress.org. Views expressed in the Journal reflect those of the authors and are not necessarily the views of the Journal or the Asia Pacific Theological Seminary. . © Asia Pacific Theological Seminary, 2020 Copyright is waived where reproduction of material from this Journal is required for classroom use or course work by students.
  • Asian Journal of Pentecostal Studies 20, no. 1 (February 2017)

    ORU Library, Holy Spirit Research Center (Digital Showcase, 2017-02-01)
    Theme: Issues in New Testament Studies, Part 2.
  • Asian Journal of Pentecostal Studies, 24, no 1 (February 2021)

    ORU Library, Holy Spirit Research Center (Digital Showcase, 2021-02-01)
    Asian Journal of Pentecostal Studies ISSN 0118-8534 Vol. 23, No. 1 (February 2020) Editor David M. Johnson, DMiss Board of Reference: Wonsuk Ma (Korea), Simon Chan (Singapore), Roji T. George and Josfin Raj (India), Robert P. Menzies (Northern Asia), Sang Yun Lee (Korea), Jacqueline N. Grey (Australia), Edwardneil Benavidez (Philippines), Olga Zaprometova (Russia), David Singh (India/UK) Book Review Editor: Adrian P. Rosen, PhD. Editorial Committee: Frank McNelis (Senior Editor), Stuart Rochester, Rosemarie Daher Kowalski, Debbie Johnson, Joy Varnell, Catherine McGee, Jon Smith, and Kimberly Snider Layout Editor: Mil Santos The ASIAN JOURNAL OF PENTECOSTAL STUDIES is published twice per year (February and August) by the Faculty of Asia Pacific Theological Seminary, P.O. Box 377, Baguio City 2600, Philippines. The current and all past editions of the Journal can be downloaded free at www.aptspress.org. Views expressed in the Journal reflect those of the authors and are not necessarily the views of the Journal or the Asia Pacific Theological Seminary. . © Asia Pacific Theological Seminary, 2020 Copyright is waived where reproduction of material from this Journal is required for classroom use or course work by students.
  • Asian Journal of Pentecostal Studies 23, no. 2 (August 2020),

    ORU Library, Holy Spirit Research Center (Digital Showcase, 2020-08-01)
    Asian Journal of Pentecostal Studies 23, no. 2 (August 2020),
  • Asian Journal of Pentecostal Studies 19, no. 2, (August 2016)

    ORU Library, Holy Spirit Research Center (Digital Showcase, 2016-08-01)
  • Asian Journal of Pentecostal Studies 18, no. 2 (August 2015)

    ORU Library, Holy Spirit Research Center (Digital Showcase, 2015-08-01)
  • Asian Journal of Pentecostal Studies, 20.1, 2017

    ORU Library, Holy Spirit Research Center (Digital Showcase, 2017-02-01)
  • Asian Journal of Pentecostal Studies 19, no. 1 (February 2016)

    ORU Library, Holy Spirit Research Center (Digital Showcase, 2016-02-01)
  • Asian Journal of Pentecostal Studies 18, no. 1 (February 2015)

    ORU Library, Holy Spirit Research Center (Digital Showcase, 2015-02-01)
  • Asian Journal of Pentecostal Studies 23, no. 1 (February 2020)

    Holy Spirit Research Center ORU Library (Digital Showcase, 2020-02-01)
  • Asian Journal of Pentecostal Studies 22, no. 2 (August 2019)

    Holy Spirit Research Center ORU Library (Digital Showcase, 2019-08-01)
  • Asian Journal of Pentecostal Studies 22, no. 1 (February 2019)

    ORU Library, Holy Spirit Research Center (Digital Showcase, 2019-02-01)
    Asian Journal of Pentecostal Studies Volume 22, Number 1 (February 2019) EDITORIAL Dave Johnson Asian Theological Issues Part 1 1-2 ARTICLES William Toh, “Issues Arising from Weak Ecclesiological Concepts in the Modern Day Pentecostal Church: Part 1,” 3-20 William Toh “Issues Arising from Weak Ecclesiological Concepts in the Modern Day Pentecostal Church: Part 2,” 21-30 Lora Angeline Embudo-Timenia “Critical Understanding of a Filipino Third Wave Signs and Wonders Theology: A Case Study of Hiram Pangilinan: Part 1,” 31-47 Lora Angeline Embudo-Timenia, “Critical Understanding of a Filipino Third Wave Signs and Wonders Theology: A Case Study of Hiram Pangilinan: Part 2,” 49-63 Bernard Koh Ming Huat, “Constructing Chineseness in Ministry: A Contextualized (Re)thinking with Special Reference to Chinese Church in Indonesia and Singapore: Part 1,” 65-82 Bernard Koh Ming Huat, “Constructing Chineseness in Ministry: A Contextualized (Re)thinking with Special Reference to Chinese Church in Indonesia and Singapore: Part 2,” 83-99 PRESS RELEASES Press Release 1 “Press Release on the International Dialogue Between The World Communion of Reformed Churches and Classical Pentecostals,” 101-102 Press Release 2 “Third meeting of the International Lutheran-Pentecostal Dialogue 7 - 12 October 2018, Santiago, Chile Communiqué,” 103-104 BOOK REVIEWS Dr. Vee J.D-Davidson F. Gerald Downing, Formation for Knowing God: Imagining God: AtOne-ing, Transforming, for Self-Revealing, 105-107 Jun Kim Sang Yun Lee, A Theology of Hope: Contextual Perspective in Korean Pentecostalism, 108-115
  • Asian Journal of Pentecostal Studies 21.2 (August 2018)

    Faculty of Asia Pacific Theological Seminary (Digital Showcase, 2018-08-01)
    Asian Journal of Pentecostal Studies Volume 21, Number 2 (August 2018) Dave Johnson, "Biblical Responses to Animism in Asia" ARTICLES Bee Huyen Nguyen, "Divination Versus Prophecy and Implications for Discipleship in the Vietnamese Context" Dave Johnson, "Baptism in the Holy Spirit vs Spirit Possession in the Lowland Philippines:Some Considerations for Discipleship" Yao Jiugang (Stephen), "The Chinese Concept of Tian (Heaven): Part 1" Yao Jiugang (Stephen), "The Chinese Concept of Tian (Heaven): Part 2 么久刚 华人天观与基督教上帝观之比较: 第一部分 么久刚 华人天观与基督教上帝观之比较: 第二部分 BOOK REVIEWS Paul J. Palma Gerald H. Anderson, ed., Witness to World Christianity: The International Association for Mission Studies Mark Anderson Samuel Lee, A New Kind of Pentecostalism: Promoting Dialogue for Change
  • The Indigenous Principle Revisited

    Carter, John F. (Asia Pacific Theological Seminary, 1998)
    "For a most of this century the approach to missions which has generally characterized the overseas ministries of evangelical missions agencies has been based on the indigenous church principle.2 The indigenous principle suggests that the goal of the missionary movement is to bring the church in the lands where missionaries serve to the place where it is "self-supporting, self-governing and self-propagating."3 Indeed, if one were to ask many missionaries what they see as their future on the field, they would likely answer that their goal is to "work myself out of a job." While this statement echoes the sentiments of the indigenous principle,4 it may be unrealistic in the context of missions programs and realities as we approach the beginning of a new century. It is the purpose of this paper to evaluate some of the observable, though perhaps unintended, effects of the indigenous principle and to argue that a different conceptualization of the missionary task may be needed in some situations--one that places an emphasis on the interdependence of the ministry of missionaries and the national churches they serve."
  • Notes on Joel 3:1-5

    Hymes, David C. (Asia Pacific Theological Seminary, 1998)
    "The pericope, Joel 3:1-5 has attracted the attention of both Biblical Scholars and interested believers. This ability to attract attention, derives from both its Old Testament context and significance along with its New Testament usage’s (Acts 2:17-21; Mark 13:24; Rom 10:13). Yet beyond its intra-testamentality it challenges the way we understand our relationship with God and those special “transformational moments” we experience and call spiritual."
  • Toward an Asian Pentecostal Theology

    Ma, Wonsuk (Asia Pacific Theological Seminary, 1998)
    "In the past two decades, the validity of Asian theological reflections has been forcefully argued not only by liberal theologians, but also Evangelicals.2 As a result, a consensus has emerged through critical Asian theological reflections for the legitimacy of Asian theology. However, the question remains: How shall we construct such a theological framework? Meanwhile, the century-old Pentecostal movement is experiencing several paradigm shifts in theological reflection. Case in point, various theological concerns were raised in two recent conferences: Brighton Conference of World Evangelization (1991)3 and Globalization of Pentecostalism Conference in Costa Rica (1996). In particular, the stance on constructing a Pentecostal theology was convincingly argued by participants from various parts of the world and traditions. Despite this progress, there are many basic unsettled issues in doing Pentecostal theology, let alone Pentecostal theologies related to specific contexts. As an example, the exact nature of the baptism in the Spirit, the primary Pentecostal distinctive, continues to be hotly debated."
  • A Pneumatological Approach to Virtue Ethics

    Lewis, Paul W. (Asia Pacific Theological Seminary, 1998)
    "Pentecostalism in Asia, the west (western Europe and North America), and the rest of the world, has been typified as emotional, worship-oriented, and emphasizing the spiritual gifts. This tends to be true, and in most cases, it was a corrective to the more cognitive, liturgical ecclesiastical approach which did not demonstrate the charismata. Initially, the early Pentecostals used their theological, pastoral, and educational energies to refute antagonistic responses mainly from other Protestant groups who reacted negatively to the perceived emotionalism, and lack of proper theology of these Pentecostals. Unfortunately, many of the Pentecostals who came from a strong holiness tradition with an emphasis on high moral lives and ethical behavior were drawn into the debates over the baptism of the Holy Spirit, the gifts of the Spirit, and tongues. Thereby, essentially neglecting whole fields of theological and ethical inquiry from a Pentecostal perspective."
  • Acts 10: A Gentile Model for Pentecostal Experience

    Yue Chuen, Lim (Asia Pacific Theological Seminary, 1998)
    "One of the doctrinal heritages of the classical Pentecostals has been Spirit-baptism."
  • An Evangelical Critique of "Initial Evidence" Doctrine

    Lim, David S. (Asia Pacific Theological Seminary, 1998)
    "It is a privilege to be asked to write this article as a representative of the Asian Evangelical theological community. The writer appreciates this openness to honest academic dialogue on one of the key distinctives of Pentecostal theology. It is hoped that this essay will open the way forward for a common understanding and a more biblical theology of those who believe in the doctrine of “initial evidence” and those who do not."

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