• Ecopsychology: Remembering the True Source of our Consciousness

      Glenn Aparacio Parry (Cosmos Publishing Cooperative, 2016-10-14)
      Mainstream psychology is limited by the a-priori assumption that consciousness is an epiphenomenon of the brain; while the emergent discipline of ecopsychology posits the whole of Nature as the source of our consciousness. Ecopsychologists contend that we do not think independently from nature-that it is the living elements of Nature from which human consciousness co-arises. The formal academic discipline of psychology-  formed in the late 19th century-attempted to isolate human consciousness from the rest of Nature. Mainstream psychology is not unique in this attempt; nearly all other academic disciplines, including economics, are based on a similar abstract separation from Nature in an attempt to maintain scientific objectivity. In the past century, quantum theory upended the conventional separation between observer and observed, but mainstream psychology failed to adapt. Ecopsychology, through reestablishing connection to Nature, is a movement in the right direction of dissolving the dichotomous split in consciousness. It must avoid the pitfalls of academe, however, and not become an abstract discipline.
    • Editorial Introduction

      Arran Gare; Swinburne University (Cosmos Publishing Cooperative, 2007-08-17)
      Editorial Introduction to Cosmos and History, Vol.3, No. 1.br /
    • Editorial Introduction to the First Edition of Cosmos and History

      Arran Gare; Swinburne University; Paul Ashton; Victoria and LaTrobe University (Cosmos Publishing Cooperative, 2005-10-20)
      Editorial
    • Editorial: Creating the Future

      Arran Gare; Swinburne University (Cosmos Publishing Cooperative, 2018-12-12)
      This is the editorial for the special edition of Cosmos and History, Creating the Future
    • Editors Introduction

      University of Dundee; Michael O'Neill Burns; University of Dundee; Brian Smith; University of Dundee (Cosmos Publishing Cooperative, 2011-10-13)
      Editorial Introduction to 'Real Objects or Material Subjects? Essays in Contemporary Continental Metaphysics' by Michael Burns & Brian Smith.
    • Education as Resistance in Literary Criticism and Journalism: Between Professionalization and Democratization of Literature

      Nathalia Jabur; King's College London (Cosmos Publishing Cooperative, 2010-12-20)
      Professionalization and political engagement are usually placed as incompatible in the case of journalism and the mainstream press, resulting in an identification of cultural resistance exclusively with alternative/amateur vehicles. I will use the concept of journalistic field as introduced by Pierre Bourdieu to review these assumptions and discuss a form of political resistance that acts in one’s own area of knowledge, is not overtly political and whose effects are not immediately accountable for. Drawing examples from my research on two literary newspapers published in the 1950s in Brazil and Uruguay, this paper will focus on the implications of didacticism for literary criticism as a genre of newswriting. The analysis of these newspapers will lead to a reflection on two main issues: a) the conflict between the professionalization and democratization of literature; and b) the definition of resistance as necessarily an action that is against something. The article will reconsider education in journalism as a form of resistance, taking into account its risks of becoming political indoctrination and commercial manipulation, but emphasizing its potential as a way of expanding access to literature.
    • Effects of Intention; Energy Healing and Mind-Body States on Biophoton Emission

      Global Gateway Foundation; Dr. Jacqueline Chan; and the Federico and Elvia Faggin Foundation; Beverly Rubik; Institute for Frontier Science; Harry Jabs (Cosmos Publishing Cooperative, 2017-03-26)
      Beyond life as a biochemical system, endogenous and exogenous energy fields play an important role in the living state.  The biofield, the energy field associated with life, consists of low intensity electric, magnetic, and electromagnetic fields that may be key to health and healing. Here we measured one component of the biofield, the ultraweak light emitted from the body-biophotons-and explored the influence of intention, extraordinary mind-body states, and human interaction on biophoton emission.  Three pilot studies were conducted to investigate whether biophoton emission is a biomarker correlated with intention.  Results showed that (1) biophoton emission from healers' hands diminished significantly by 11% post-healing; (2) biophoton emission during energy healing showed a unique pattern for each treatment session; (3) changes in biophoton emission from the forehead, heart, and abdominal regions of patients pre-post energy healing showed no discernible pattern for a small number of diverse patients; (4) subjects who engaged in bioenergetic practices emitted more biophotons from specific bodily regions, some in alignment with their intent.  Biophoton emission was found to be modulated by intention, energy healing, and bioenergetic mind-body practices. Biophotons might potentially be involved in quantum or quantum-like entanglement between humans, and may play a role in energy healing, biocommunication, and altered mind-body states.
    • El estadio ético de Kierkegaard en las categorías lógicas de Hegel: posibilidad, realidad y necesidad actuales

      María J. Binetti; Conicet (Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas), Argentina; Hong Kier (Cosmos Publishing Cooperative, 2007-12-28)
      Durante deacute;cadas, la historia de la filosofiacute;a ha separado a Kierkegaard de Hegel y a Hegel de Kierkegaard, en detrimento tanto de la grandeza especulativa del pensamiento kierkegaardiano como de la vena existencial del sistema de Hegel. En oposicioacute;n a esta desafortunada lectura, el presente artiacute;culo intenta mostrar la profunda convergencia que une internamente el estadio eacute;tico de Kierkegaard con las maacute;s importantes categoriacute;as loacute;gicas de Hegel. Ambos pensadores conciben la idea como el poder real del devenir subjetivo y la existencia como la concrecioacute;n actual de lo ideal. Para ambos, la pura eneacute;rgeia de la libertad, que comienza en la posibilidad abstracta y esteacute;tica de la inmediatez subjetiva, se realiza a siacute; misma como la actual concrecioacute;n de la finitud, capaz de asumir lo temporal y contingente por la fuerza eterna y necesaria del deber. La repeticioacute;n kierkegaardiana no es nada sino el poder de lo ideal, capaz de mediar el flujo de las diferencias finitas en la eterna identidad del sujeto. Sin embargo, tanto para Kierkegaard como para Hegel existe una absoluta contradiccioacute;n, llamada a promover la superacioacute;n de lo eacute;tico.
    • El estadio ético de Kierkegaard en las categorías lógicas de Hegel: posibilidad, realidad y necesidad actuales

      María J. Binetti; Conicet (Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas), Argentina; Hong Kier (Cosmos Publishing Cooperative, 2007-12-28)
      Durante deacute;cadas, la historia de la filosofiacute;a ha separado a Kierkegaard de Hegel y a Hegel de Kierkegaard, en detrimento tanto de la grandeza especulativa del pensamiento kierkegaardiano como de la vena existencial del sistema de Hegel. En oposicioacute;n a esta desafortunada lectura, el presente artiacute;culo intenta mostrar la profunda convergencia que une internamente el estadio eacute;tico de Kierkegaard con las maacute;s importantes categoriacute;as loacute;gicas de Hegel. Ambos pensadores conciben la idea como el poder real del devenir subjetivo y la existencia como la concrecioacute;n actual de lo ideal. Para ambos, la pura eneacute;rgeia de la libertad, que comienza en la posibilidad abstracta y esteacute;tica de la inmediatez subjetiva, se realiza a siacute; misma como la actual concrecioacute;n de la finitud, capaz de asumir lo temporal y contingente por la fuerza eterna y necesaria del deber. La repeticioacute;n kierkegaardiana no es nada sino el poder de lo ideal, capaz de mediar el flujo de las diferencias finitas en la eterna identidad del sujeto. Sin embargo, tanto para Kierkegaard como para Hegel existe una absoluta contradiccioacute;n, llamada a promover la superacioacute;n de lo eacute;tico.
    • Energy and Semiotics: The Second Law and the Origin of Life

      Stanley Salthe; Binghamton University (USA) (Cosmos Publishing Cooperative, 2005-10-20)
      After deconstructing the thermodynamic concepts of work and waste, I take up Howard Odum’s idea of energy quality, which tallies the overall amount of energy needed to be dissipated in order to accomplish some work of interest. This was developed from economic considerations that give obvious meaning to the work accomplished. But the energy quality idea can be used to import meaning more generally into Nature. It could be viewed as projecting meaning back from any marked work into preceding energy gradient dissipations that immediately paved the way for it. But any work done by an abiotic dissipative structure, since it would be without positive economic significance, would also be difficult to mark as a starting point for the energy quality calculation. Furthermore, any (for humans) destructive work as by hurricanes or floods, with negative economic significance, would not seem to merit the quality calculation either. But there has been abiotic work of keen interest to us—that which mediated the origin of life. Some kind(s) of abiotic dissipative structures had to have been the framework(s) that fostered this process, regardless of how it might come to be understood in detail. Since all dissipative structures have the same thermodynamic and informational organization in common, any of them might provide the material context for the origin of something. So we can pick any starting point we wish, and calculate backward what sequence of energy usages would have been necessary to set it up. Given such an open ended project, we could not find an obvious place in any sequence to stop and start the forward the calculation, and so we would need to take it right back to an ultimate beginning, like the insolation of some area, or the outpouring of Earth’s thermal energy. Any energy dissipation might be the beginning of something of importance, and so Nature is as replete with potential meanings as it is with energy gradients.
    • Enlivening Society: Life as Elasticity in Henri Bergson's Le Rire

      Adam Lovasz; ELTE (Cosmos Publishing Cooperative, 2020-10-14)
      We seek to present a reading of Henri Bergson’s 1900 work, Le Rire (Laughter). The primary theme of this book is the comic phenomenon, as expressed through the bodily element of laughter. What interests Bergson is the evolutionary role of laughter in social regulation. As the vitalist philosopher sees things, society is perpetually threatened by the danger of rigidity. Society is always in danger of regressing into a machinic, static, rigid state. We laugh at living human beings who behave automatically and machinically. Hence, laughter is a form of punishment, designed to compel individuals to behave more organically. Subsequent authors on humor have extensively critiqued Bergson’s rather narrow equation of humor with punishment, drawing attention to the wide variety of comic types. What especially interests us is how Le Rire can be read as part of a broader vitalist concern with the maintenance of an organicity always under threat from its own tendencies. Finally, we also interpret Bergson’s works written during World War One in light of the author’s own commitment to social spontaneity. A close reading reveals an inner tension between the philosopher’s conformist patriotic commitment to the French war effort and the general vitalism and universalism of the Bergsonian philosophy.
    • Ethics After God’s Death and the Time of the Angels

      Marianna Papastephanou; Associate Prof of Philosophy, Uni of Cyprus, Dept of Edu (Cosmos Publishing Cooperative, 2012-05-03)
    • Ethics, Philosophy and the Environment

      Arran Gare; Swinburne University (Cosmos Publishing Cooperative, 2018-12-12)
      Educated people everywhere now acknowledge that ecological destruction is threatening the future of civilization. While philosophers have concerned themselves with environmental problems, they appear to offer little to deal with this crisis. Despite this, I will argue that philosophy, and ethics, are absolutely crucial to overcoming this crisis. Philosophy has to recover its grand ambitions to achieve a comprehensive understanding of nature and the place of humanity within it, and ethics needs to be centrally concerned with the virtues required to create and then sustain economic, social and political formations that augment the life of ecological communities. Achieving this will involve reviving speculative philosophy and its quest to forge a synthesis of natural philosophy, history and art to enable humanity to redefine its place in the world in a practical way. Such a synthesis is required to oppose the corrosion of democracy and revive citizenship and the sense of responsibility this entails, but more fundamentally and intimately related to this, to oppose managerialism and the proletarianization of the workforce and to revive workmanship and professionalism as the foundation of not only economic life, but social and political life.
    • Evidence of Macroscopic Quantum Phenomena and Conscious Reality Selection

      Cynthia Sue Larson; Reality Shifters (Cosmos Publishing Cooperative, 2014-06-08)
      The purpose of this paper is to present an overview of emergent examples of macroscopic quantum phenomena. While quantum theory asserts that such quantum behaviors as superposition, entanglement, and coherence are possible for all objects, assumptions that quantum processes operate exclusively within the quantum realm have contributed to on-going bias toward presumed primacy of classical physics in the macroscopic realm. Non-trivial quantum macroscopic effects are now recognized in the fields of biology, quantum physics, quantum computing, quantum astronomy, and neuroscience, with implications for medicine, psychology and sociology. Robust examples of macroscopic quantum coherence and entanglement contain unmistakable biological advantages, such as are observed in the green sulphur bacteria photosynthesis transfer mechanism, and in the navigational system of the European Robin. Macroscopic quantum processes in the form of an olfactory electron tunneling mechanism best account for the otherwise inexplicable difference observed in the odor of identically-shaped molecules. Evidence of reverse-direction causality is apparent in experiments with large numbers of photons and human subjects. Entanglement, retrocausality, and superposition of states are suggested as causal factors to account for increases in efficacy of the placebo effect. Alternate histories of "flashbulb memories" and embodied cognition are considered as possible examples of superposition of states in a holographic multiverse in which the many worlds of the multiverse and the many worlds of quantum mechanics might just be one and the same thing.
    • Evidence of Shared Aspects of Complexity Science and Quantum Phenomena

      Cynthia Larson (Cosmos Publishing Cooperative, 2016-10-14)
      Complexity science concepts of emergence, self-organization, and feedback suggest that descriptions of systems and events are subjective, incomplete, and impermanent-similar to what we observe in quantum phenomena. Complexity science evinces an increasingly compelling alternative to reductionism for describing physical phenomena, now that shared aspects of complexity science and quantum phenomena are being scientifically substantiated. Establishment of a clear connection between chaotic complexity and quantum entanglement in small quantum systems indicates the presence of common processes involved in thermalization in large and small-scale systems. Recent findings in the fields of quantum physics, quantum biology, and quantum cognition demonstrate evidence of the complexity science characteristics of sensitivity to initial conditions and emergence of self-organizing systems. Efficiencies in quantum superposition suggest a new paradigm in which our very notion of complexity depends on which information theory we choose to employ.
    • Evolution to Autonomy

      Horace Lockwood Fairlamb; University of Houston-Victoria (Cosmos Publishing Cooperative, 2007-08-17)
      Since both modern moral theory and evolutionary theory arose in the shadow of Newtonian and Humean conceptions of nature, debates about evolutionary ethics have typically been vexed by deeper problems with the nature of evolution itself as well as meta-ethical questions about the link between facts and values. Humean skepticism and mechanistic selectionism have recently coincided in postmodern attacks on essentialism,on meta-narratives of progress, on models of human nature, and on moral collectivism. Against this most recent wave of skepticism, however, contemporary reconstructions of evolution in light of complex systems science suggest useful ways of reinterpreting both evolutionary causation, the biology of human nature, and their implications for ethics.
    • Evolution to Autonomy

      Horace Lockwood Fairlamb; University of Houston-Victoria (Cosmos Publishing Cooperative, 2007-08-17)
      Since both modern moral theory and evolutionary theory arose in the shadow of Newtonian and Humean conceptions of nature, debates about evolutionary ethics have typically been vexed by deeper problems with the nature of evolution itself as well as meta-ethical questions about the link between facts and values. Humean skepticism and mechanistic selectionism have recently coincided in postmodern attacks on essentialism,on meta-narratives of progress, on models of human nature, and on moral collectivism. Against this most recent wave of skepticism, however, contemporary reconstructions of evolution in light of complex systems science suggest useful ways of reinterpreting both evolutionary causation, the biology of human nature, and their implications for ethics.
    • Evolutionary Naturalism and the Logical Structure of Valuation: The Other Side of Error Theory

      Richard A Richards; University of Alabama (Cosmos Publishing Cooperative, 2005-12-19)
      On one standard philosophical position adopted by evolutionary naturalists, human ethical systems are nothing more than evolutionary adaptations that facilitate social behavior. Belief in an absolute moral foundation is therefore in error. But evolutionary naturalism, by its commitment to the basic valutional concept of fitness, reveals another, logical error: standard conceptions of value in terms of simple predication and properties are mistaken. Valuation has instead, a relational structure that makes reference to respects, subjects and environments. This relational nature is illustrated by the analogy commonly drawn between value and color. Color perception, as recognized by the ecological concept, is relational and dependent on subject and environment. In a similar way, value is relational and dependent on subject and environment. This makes value subjective, but also objective in that it is grounded on facts about mattering. At bottom, values are complex relational facts. The view presented here, unlike other prominent relational and naturalistic conceptions of value, recognizes the full range of valuation in nature. The advantages of this relational conception are first, that it gets valuation right; second, it provides a framework to better explain and understand valuation in all its varieties and patterns.
    • Evolutionary Naturalism and the Logical Structure of Valuation: The Other Side of Error Theory

      Richard A Richards; University of Alabama (Cosmos Publishing Cooperative, 2005-12-19)
      On one standard philosophical position adopted by evolutionary naturalists, human ethical systems are nothing more than evolutionary adaptations that facilitate social behavior. Belief in an absolute moral foundation is therefore in error. But evolutionary naturalism, by its commitment to the basic valutional concept of fitness, reveals another, logical error: standard conceptions of value in terms of simple predication and properties are mistaken. Valuation has instead, a relational structure that makes reference to respects, subjects and environments. This relational nature is illustrated by the analogy commonly drawn between value and color. Color perception, as recognized by the ecological concept, is relational and dependent on subject and environment. In a similar way, value is relational and dependent on subject and environment. This makes value subjective, but also objective in that it is grounded on facts about mattering. At bottom, values are complex relational facts. The view presented here, unlike other prominent relational and naturalistic conceptions of value, recognizes the full range of valuation in nature. The advantages of this relational conception are first, that it gets valuation right; second, it provides a framework to better explain and understand valuation in all its varieties and patterns.
    • Exploring Consciousness Through the Qualitative Content of Equations

      Ashok Narasimhan; Menas Kafatos (Cosmos Publishing Cooperative, 2016-10-14)
      The majority of the focus on equations in physics has been on the mathematical and computational aspects. Here we focus on the qualitative content of what the relationships expressed in equations imply. In some sense, we are asking foundational questions about the ontology of equations.