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dc.contributor.authorSheryl Ann Ludwig
dc.contributor.authorMargaret Diane LeCompte
dc.date.accessioned2019-10-25T07:00:29Z
dc.date.available2019-10-25T07:00:29Z
dc.date.created2017-09-25 09:44
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifieroai:redalyc.org:29843497005
dc.identifierhttp://www.redalyc.org/articulo.oa?id=29843497005
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12424/1355544
dc.description.abstractThis work contrasts what is taught and learned other than what is intended in different educative settings and two historical eras. In a comparison of ethnographic studies conducted in the US and in Guatemala, it compares the hidden curriculum (KOHLBERG, 1975) of formal western schooling the norms, values and practices that are conveyed by the content knowledge taught, and the interaction patterns, assessment procedures and participation structures used (PHILLIPS, 1983) with similar structures in an indigenous Maya community in Guatemala. It analyzes what children learn, the impact on their identities, and how those types of learning connect to future social and occupational destinations. Educational settings differ in the types of learning and teaching they support; they produce different kinds of learners with different identities and goals. It has been argued that modern schooling actually interferes with the values and practices of so-called traditional cultures, leading to the abandonment of traditional languages, practices and beliefs. Such an argument denies the flexibility of traditional cultures, relegating them to a static present not characteristic of the dynamic identities actually being constructed in the 21st century. Conversely, we argue that traditional pedagogies can protect enduring cultural identity (SPINDLER, G; SPINDLER, L, 2000) and lead to more successful accommodation to modernity (RUDOLPH, L; RUDOLPH, S, 1984). We connect this argument with research exploring myths about what schooling can and cannot do to achieve social mobility and improved societal conditions.
dc.format.mediumapplication/pdf
dc.languageen
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherUniversidade de São Paulo
dc.relation.ispartofhttp://www.redalyc.org/revista.oa?id=298
dc.rightsEducação e Pesquisa
dc.sourceEducação e Pesquisa (Brasil) Vol.41
dc.subjectEducación
dc.subjectIndigenous identity
dc.subjectHidden curriculum
dc.subjectSchooling
dc.subjectCultural reproduction
dc.subjectSociology of education
dc.titleFinding the contemporary in the traditional: reassessing the impact of indigenous Maya and modern western pedagogies on identity and self
dc.typeArtículo científico
ge.collectioncodeOAIDATA
ge.dataimportlabelOAI metadata object
ge.identifier.legacyglobethics:11339292
ge.identifier.permalinkhttps://www.globethics.net/gel/11339292
ge.lastmodificationdate2017-09-25 09:44
ge.lastmodificationuseradmin@pointsoftware.ch (import)
ge.submissions0
ge.oai.exportid149403
ge.oai.repositoryid3008
ge.oai.streamid2
ge.setnameGlobeEthicsLib
ge.setspecglobeethicslib
ge.linkhttp://www.redalyc.org/articulo.oa?id=29843497005


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