• 2020

      Lundblad, Barbara (Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago, 2019-12-10)
      This section offers the user ideas and inspiration for sermons, from their peers, for the weekends in 2020 from January 5 (Second Sunday after Christmas) through March 29 (Fifth Sunday in Lent).
    • 2020: Perfect Vision and Preaching

      Lundblad, Barbara (Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago, 2019-12-10)
      This section offers the user ideas and inspiration for sermons, from their peers, for the weekends in 2020 from January 5 (Second Sunday after Christmas) through March 29 (Fifth Sunday in Lent).
    • 9.5 Theses on Earth Stewardship

      Carlson, David M (Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago, 2017-12-28)
      This article outlines Lutheran support for earth stewardship as a new reformation in the form of nine (and a half) theses, most of which incorporate Latin phrases that are defined and further explicated. Its intention is to ground ecologically redemptive concepts in traditional theological terms related to Martin Luther and his legacy, and to point readers toward the earth-honoring work of contemporary Lutheran theologians. 
    • A Beloved Earth Community: Christian Mission in an Ecological Age

      Rhoads, David; Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago; Rossing, Barbara; Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago (Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago, 2016-03-22)
      This essay was first published in Mission after Christendom: Emergent Themes in Contemporary Mission, ed. Ogbu Kalu, Peter Vethanayagamony, and Edmund Kee-Fook Chia (Louisville: Westminster/John Knox, 2010).
    • A Bishops' Letter about the Climate

      Westhelle, Vitor; Professor of Systematic Theology, Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago (Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago, 2016-03-22)
      Archbishop Antje Jackelén, LSTC Adjunct Professor of Systematic Theology, delivered the 2015 Commencement Address at the Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago. During her time in Chicago, the LSTC Board of Directors and Faculty read and discussed a letter about the climate approved by the bishops of the Church of Sweden at the Bishops’ Conference of 2014 (A Bishops’ letter about the climate, Uppasala: Ineko, 2014). This essay is one of the formal responses to the letter, presented by Dr. Vítor Westhelle. It lifts up in particular the theological convictions about spirituality and theological anthropology present in the bishops’ letter, a letter that calls the global church to action in the face of the threat of climate change.
    • A Breadth of Belonging: Navigating Interreligious and Intercultural Spaces

      Billman, Kathleen D. (Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago, 2020-12-15)
      Provides an introduction to the January 2021 issue, highlighting the essays included. The contents of the first section of the issue explore identity and difference and probe the complexities of asserting what "home" means for people who have a foot in more than one world.  The second section of essays extend the theme of the issue in a variety of directions.
    • A Case for Closed Communion in Interfaith Contexts

      Numrich, Paul D. (Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago, 2019-03-25)
      This article argues that Communion is a Christian identity-marking rite and thus it is justifiably restricted to Christian participation. A distinction is made between Communion and Jesus’ radically inclusive dining fellowship, the latter providing a model for sharing meals with adherents of other faiths. This article challenges the notion that closed Communion hampers harmonious interfaith relations and encourages Christians to dine with adherents of other faiths in a way that both accomplishes interfaith goals and maintains the integrity of the Christian rite of Communion. 
    • A House Divided? Reconsidering Newbigin’s The Household of God, Six Decades Later

      Schattauer Paillé, Joseph (Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago, 2017-03-21)
      As “missional theology†becomes a buzzword in the church, many church leaders and pastors find themselves looking for new ways of thinking about and being church. Lesslie Newbigin’s The Household of God remains an indispensable contribution to this conversation. This article re-evaluates how Newbigin’s theology of eschatology from 1952 can be used in churches today. The church lives in mission and strives toward unity only when it first lives into its eschatological calling to be a sign, instrument, and foretaste of the kingdom of God.
    • A House Divided? Reconsidering Newbigin’s The Household of God, Six Decades Later

      Schattauer Paillé, Joseph (Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago, 2017-03-21)
      As “missional theology” becomes a buzzword in the church, many church leaders and pastors find themselves looking for new ways of thinking about and being church. Lesslie Newbigin’s The Household of God remains an indispensable contribution to this conversation. This article re-evaluates how Newbigin’s theology of eschatology from 1952 can be used in churches today. The church lives in mission and strives toward unity only when it first lives into its eschatological calling to be a sign, instrument, and foretaste of the kingdom of God.
    • A Listening Paradigm for the North American Church in a Globalized World

      Fox, Jonah (Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago, 2021-06-16)
      The Western world quickly continues to globalize, and the North American Church continues to grow less homogenous. This is something that ought to be celebrated, but the Church faces an important question: “When faced with hermeneutical controversy, from which culture do we derive our norms?” In the Western Church, norms have typically been set by whiteness and masculinity. The author proposes a paradigm for listening to our siblings from around the world through the work of Palestinian Christian, Naim Ateek.
    • A Living Body

      Thomas, Linda E.; Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago (Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago, 2016-03-22)
      Sermon delivered on Earth Day, April 22, 2015.
    • A Mess Makes Us Free

      Needham, River Cook; Warfield-May, J. Pace (Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago, 2021-06-16)
      This issue of Currents in Theology and Mission offers up queer theologies that resist categorization. Now, perhaps more than ever before, there is need for the church to show leadership by taking a theological and ethical stance on behalf of marginalized communities. Inspired by this, queer theology has continued to grow and develop, doing the messy work of creating new ways of doing theology in community. The authors of the included essays hold a variety of lived experiences, which overlap in the messiness of queer and LGBTQIA+ theologies.
    • A New Creation

      Lowe, Mary (Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago, 2020-03-05)
      In her essay, Mary Lowe demonstrates that the social statement’s openness is grounded in Lutheran commitments to the diversity of creation, neighbor justice, and the body of Christ. She then contends that the document’s expansive welcome is informed by three significant shifts in the way theologians, scientists, and theorists view sex, gender, and sexuality.  
    • A New Reformation (Together this Time!): Lutheran and Byzantine Churstians for Ecological Justice

      Frank, Chrysostom (Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago, 2019-07-05)
      As we face a looming ecological crisis, all Christians are called to act to preserve creation. To do this well, ecumenical thinking is needed. Lutherans and Byzantine Christians may find commonality in their diverse theological traditions that can bring them together in a new “Eco-Reformation” for our own day. A variety of Lutheran accents find deep resonances within the Eastern Christian tradition. Being able to see and to identify these gifts of Lutheranism to the universal church can enable us not only to draw closer to one another, but also to empower us in the battle to preserve creation.
    • A Preacher Stands Up to Preach...

      Lundblad, Barbara (Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago, 2019-09-29)
      Preaching Helps for this issue of Currents in Theology and Mission include the Seventeenth Sunday after Pentecost (October 6, 2019) through Christmas Day (December 25, 2019).
    • A Preacher Stands Up to Preach...

      Lundblad, Barbara (Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago, 2019-11-11)
      Preaching Helps for this issue of Currents in Theology and Mission include the Seventeenth Sunday after Pentecost (October 6, 2019) through Christmas Day (December 25, 2019).
    • A Teacher's Life Lives On: Remembering Vítor Westhelle

      Billman, Kathleen D.; Rodriguez, Jose David (Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago, 2021-03-16)
      This issue of the journal is in memory of Vítor Westhelle who was professor of systematic theology at the Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago (1993-2018) and also taught in numerous international contexts during his career. He was keenly interested in the global contexts that shape theological inquiry and speech, helping students engage in thology that addresses their own contexts and struggles, which thus shaped his teaching and advising.
    • A Theology of Protest: The Reformation and Paul Tillich's 'Protestant Principle'

      Capetz, Paul E. (Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago, 2018-09-17)
      Many in our culture have difficulty understanding and appreciating the significance of Luther’s achievement because of its medieval trappings. Paul Tillich’s insightful reflections on the nature of Protestantism provide a helpful way to distinguish what is of mere historical interest from what is of enduring value in Luther’s legacy. Tillich exemplifies the kind of dialogical historical-theological engagement with the church’s heritage that is urgently needed, since it is captive neither to the right with its ideological misuse of the past in support of conservatism nor to the left with its ideological rejection of the past as oppressive.
    • A Tribute to Dr. Kurt Hendel

      Montover, Nathan (Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago, 2016-12-20)
      Introduction to the January 2017 issue under the title: 500 Years of Reformation: A Tribute to Dr. Kurt Hendel.
    • A Winter Sojourn: Setting Off for the Gulf of Mexico on a Bike in the Dead of Winter

      Keil, Doug (Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago, 2017-12-28)
      Doug Keil took a road trip on a bike to the Gulf of Mexico. He planned to take two months to arrive and one month to get back to Northern Iowa. He slept on the ground for seventy-five to eighty nights and slept in motels for another ten to fifteen nights. He burned forty-six and one half candles on the road for heat that winter, January-March. Looking back, this trek gave him a much deeper knowledge of our culture and the people who inhabit this North American Continent.