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dc.contributor.authorIrina Mchitarjan
dc.contributor.authorRainer Reisenzein
dc.date.accessioned2019-10-25T20:37:33Z
dc.date.available2019-10-25T20:37:33Z
dc.date.created2017-09-28 23:37
dc.identifieroai:doaj.org/article:588ddfb2bbf84e9da6a3c89ee21b463a
dc.identifier10.1371/journal.pone.0141625
dc.identifier1932-6203
dc.identifierhttps://doaj.org/article/588ddfb2bbf84e9da6a3c89ee21b463a
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12424/1516995
dc.description.abstractA world-wide internet survey was conducted to test central assumptions of a recent theory of cultural transmission in minorities proposed by the authors. 844 1st to 2nd generation immigrants from a wide variety of countries recruited on a microjob platform completed a questionnaire designed to test eight hypotheses derived from the theory. Support was obtained for all hypotheses. In particular, evidence was obtained for the continued presence, in the immigrants, of the culture-transmission motive postulated by the theory: the desire to maintain the culture of origin and transmit it to the next generation. Support was also obtained for the hypothesized anchoring of the culture-transmission motive in more basic motives fulfilled by cultural groups, the relative intra- and intergenerational stability of the culture-transmission motive, and its motivating effects for action tendencies and desires that support cultural transmission under the difficult conditions of migration. Furthermore, the findings suggest that the assumption that people have a culture-transmission motive belongs to the folk psychology of sociocultural groups, and that immigrants regard the fulfillment of this desire as a moral right.
dc.languageEN
dc.publisherPublic Library of Science (PLoS)
dc.relation.ispartofhttp://europepmc.org/articles/PMC4631500?pdf=render
dc.relation.ispartofhttps://doaj.org/toc/1932-6203
dc.sourcePLoS ONE, Vol 10, Iss 11, p e0141625 (2015)
dc.subjectMedicine
dc.subjectR
dc.subjectScience
dc.subjectQ
dc.titleThe Culture-Transmission Motive in Immigrants: A World-Wide Internet Survey.
dc.typeArticle
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ge.identifier.permalinkhttps://www.globethics.net/gel/11581260
ge.lastmodificationdate2017-09-28 23:37
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ge.linkhttps://doaj.org/article/588ddfb2bbf84e9da6a3c89ee21b463a


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