Show simple item record

dc.contributorAbi-Mershed, Osama
dc.contributorPainter, David
dc.contributor.authorCuyler, Zachary Davis
dc.date.accessioned2019-10-25T20:38:27Z
dc.date.available2019-10-25T20:38:27Z
dc.date.created2017-09-28 23:37
dc.date.issued2014-08-14
dc.identifieroai::10822/709720
dc.identifierAPT-BAG: georgetown.edu.10822_709720.tar;APT-ETAG: 32babaa7281353c794a42348d71ccd87
dc.identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10822/709720
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12424/1517408
dc.description.abstractM.A.
dc.description.abstractThis project examines the history of the Aramco-owned Trans-Arabian Pipeline, or Tapline, focusing particularly on the history of its operations in Lebanon and labor activism by its Lebanese employees between 1950 and 1964. It applies the framework Timothy Mitchell develops in Carbon Democracy - entailing the analysis of the "chokepoints" created by energy infrastructure - to the particular case of Tapline in Lebanon, while supplementing Mitchell's "technopolitical" theoretical framework with attention to working conditions at Tapline and the particular the demands they made on their American employers. It therefore engages with literature on moral economy, class-formation, and labor politics in colonial and post-colonial settings.
dc.description.abstractMy research revolves primarily around Tapline's management strategies, the Tapline workplace as experienced by its Lebanese employees, Tapline's vulnerabilities to strike action and workers' mobilization, and Lebanese Tapline employees' unionization and participation in a mass strike in 1964. Borrowing from Frederick Cooper's analysis of labor activism in colonial West Africa, I argue that Lebanese Tapline workers exploited Tapline's "chokepoints" to force the company to live up to its promises of meritocracy and welfare for its employees, and thus tried to improve their position within the status quo of their workplace rather than radically alter it.
dc.description.abstractThis project is based on a diverse body of primary and secondary sources. Primary sources include interviews with the former head of the Tapline Laborers' Syndicate, internal documents from Aramco and Tapline, the Pipeline Periscope, an in-house magazine produced by the company for distribution to employees, coverage of Tapline and its employees' labor activism from the Lebanese press, and declassified US government documents. It aims to bring the literatures on the politics of labor and technopolitics into a productive dialogue. It also seeks to develop the historical literature on Tapline, which has received only fragmentary academic attention.
dc.format.mediumPDF
dc.languageen
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherGeorgetown University
dc.sourceGeorgetown University-Graduate School of Arts & Sciences
dc.subjectlabor
dc.subjectlebanon
dc.subjectoil
dc.subjecttapline
dc.subjecttechnopolitics
dc.subjectHistory
dc.subjectMiddle East; Research
dc.subjectHistory
dc.subjectMiddle Eastern studies
dc.title"Building the Earth": Labor Politics, Technopolitics, and Tapline in Lebanon, 1950-1964
dc.typethesis
ge.collectioncodeOAIDATA
ge.dataimportlabelOAI metadata object
ge.identifier.legacyglobethics:11581725
ge.identifier.permalinkhttps://www.globethics.net/gel/11581725
ge.lastmodificationdate2017-09-28 23:37
ge.lastmodificationuseradmin@pointsoftware.ch (import)
ge.submissions0
ge.oai.exportid148650
ge.oai.repositoryid7270
ge.oai.setnameGraduate Theses and Dissertations
ge.oai.setnameEdmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service
ge.oai.setnameGeorgetown University Institutional Repository
ge.oai.setnameCenter for Contemporary Arab Studies
ge.oai.setspeccom_10822_707883
ge.oai.setspeccom_10822_549402
ge.oai.setspeccom_10822_1
ge.oai.setspeccol_10822_552791
ge.oai.streamid2
ge.setnameGlobeEthicsLib
ge.setspecglobeethicslib
ge.linkhttp://hdl.handle.net/10822/709720


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record