International Development Policy | Revue internationale de politique de développement is a peer-reviewed, open access e-journal that publishes original, interdisciplinary, policy-relevant papers in the field of international cooperation and development. Anchored in Geneva at the Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies, it publishes contributions by researchers and reflective practitioners worldwide. Our articles aim to contribute both to scholarly discourse and to policy and practice in the field of international cooperation and development.

News

The Globethics.net library contains articles of International Development Policy as of vol. 1(2010) to current.

Recent Submissions

  • Migration, Health and Development in India, South Asia and China: Perspectives in the COVID-19 Era

    Khadria, Binod; Thakur, Narender; Mishra, Ratnam (Institut de hautes études internationales et du développementInternational Development Policy | Revue internationale de politique de développement, 2022-05-16)
    This chapter revisits the relationship between migration, health and development in the context of Global Compact for Safe, Orderly and Regular Migration (GCM) objectives interrupted by the external shock of the COVID-19 pandemic. By using recent and emerging data from global sources like the United Nations (UN), World Health Organization (WHO) and World Bank, it looks at health indicators, migration stocks and economic development parameters in select South Asian countries, including India, over the last three decades—1990–2020. These are compared against both the world totals and those for China—the East Asian country at the epicentre of COVID-19. The chapter provides background on comparative indicators of economic development in India, other major South Asian countries and China, and critically examines three issues: (a) lessons from the challenges COVID-19 posed to the GCM objective of making migration ‘safe, orderly and regular’ (SOR); (b) indicators of the relationship between migration, health and development in the context of the GCM and COVID-19; and (c) challenges emerging from the dynamic relationship between migration, health and development in the COVID-19 era.
  • Migration and the 2030 Agenda in Argentina

    Agosto, Gabriela; Rubinstein, Fabiana (Institut de hautes études internationales et du développementInternational Development Policy | Revue internationale de politique de développement, 2022-05-16)
    The United Nations 2030 Agenda and its Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) constitute the most ambitious development agenda agreed upon at the global level, with an integrated and indivisible approach to economic, social and environmental dimensions. All 17 SDGs, and initiatives to achieve them, have a direct impact on the well-being of migrant populations—which is reinforced through the Global Compact for Safe, Orderly and Regular Migration (GCM). Argentina has been receiving and welcoming migrants for many years and has in place favourable regulations on migration, such as equal access to social services. Migrants have made important contributions to the construction of Argentina and to its development process, in social, economic and cultural matters. The country, however, faces major challenges related to overcoming structural deficits, reducing social inequality, achieving economic and productive development and achieving the SDGs. These challenges were heightened by the COVID-19 pandemic. With regard to migrants, overcoming inequality when it comes to their incorporation into and full participation in the labour market—as well as to other deficits affecting them, such as poverty and housing conditions—is a matter for the public agenda if the country is to achieve the full inclusion of migrants and to comply with the 2030 Agenda’s criterion of leaving no one behind. Argentina has shown that it is interested in the well-being of migrants and has recognised their contribution to development and the shaping of its society. This is reflected in the deployment of public policies that have a positive impact on the living conditions of the migrant population. But it is also evident in the approach that the country has taken to the 2030 Agenda, which constitutes the main framework for development and for facing pending challenges.
  • Channels for Financial and Non-financial Remittances from the Ghanaian Diaspora toward Development

    Coffie, Amanda (Institut de hautes études internationales et du développementInternational Development Policy | Revue internationale de politique de développement, 2022-05-16)
    This chapter deepens the discourse on diaspora and development in countries of origin. It proposes a shift from focusing narrowly on inflows of foreign currencies to also considering other forms of remittances such as goods, skills and ideas, which help maintain emotional bonds between family and communities across generations. Ghana acknowledges the diaspora’s beneficial role in development and has established gateways to facilitate the flow of resources. However, these formal gateways are skewed toward financial remittances, seen as the essential source for the State’s developmental agenda. With its varied composition and resources, the Ghanaian diaspora uses multiple channels to contribute toward their families and local community projects through individual contributions and resource pooling. Thus, the Ghanaian diaspora’s engagement reflects a participatory approach that has received limited State recognition but is appreciated and encouraged by recipients within Ghanaian communities. The chapter recommends government provision of secure channels for financial transfers while recognising cultural remittances and social connections as crucial for sustaining families, especially for reducing poverty and ensuring food security, which are specific and immediate concerns for communities.
  • Xenophobia Denialism and the Global Compact for Migration in South Africa

    Crush, Jonathan (Institut de hautes études internationales et du développementInternational Development Policy | Revue internationale de politique de développement, 2022-05-16)
    The United Nations (UN) Global Compact for Safe, Orderly and Regular Migration (GCM) commits signatories to eliminate all forms of discrimination, and to condemn and counter expressions, acts and manifestations of racism, racial discrimination, violence, xenophobia and related intolerance. The growth of xenophobia across the global South has become increasingly apparent. Governance responses to anti-immigrant sentiment and action take three main forms: intensification, mitigation and displacement. In South Africa, policy on international migration to the country focuses more on the perceived negative impacts of migration than any potential development benefits. As a direct result, negativity pervades both public policy and popular discourse about migrants and their impact on the country. Migrants encounter an extremely hostile environment in which their constitutional and legal rights are abrogated, their ability to access basic services and resources is constrained, and their very presence in the country is excoriated by the state and citizenry. Xenophobic attitudes are deeply entrenched, and xenophobic attacks have become common. In this context, this chapter examines the response of the national government and argues that displacement is the dominant governance model. This takes two forms: xenophobia denialism and the scapegoating of migrants. Xenophobia denialism and blaming migrants for their own victimisation act as barriers to South Africa recognising, promoting and arguing for migration as a positive developmental tool and operationalising the anti-xenophobia provisions in the Global Compact.
  • Blocking the Spread of COVID-19: Global Border Closure Policies in Central America and Mexico

    Leyva Flores, René; Rojas, Karol; Aracena, Belkis (Institut de hautes études internationales et du développementInternational Development Policy | Revue internationale de politique de développement, 2022-05-16)
    One of the main actions implemented globally to control the COVID-19 pandemic has been the restriction of population mobility, by closing borders (aerial, terrestrial and maritime), restricting circulation, and ordering mandatory confinement. Latin America has been no exception, and various countries in the region have implemented, among other measures, border closures and curfew policies. Other countries, such as Mexico, have opted instead for persuasive measures appealing to the good will of the populace, asking them to stay at home and practice frequent handwashing, and have provided the public with daily information regarding the current state of the pandemic. It is to be expected that interventions that fall at either of the two extreme ends of this spectrum lead to different effects on the behaviour of the pandemic. This study aims to analyse the pandemic response measures of border closure and internal mobility restriction, and their relation to the behaviour of the COVID-19 pandemic (by case number trends), comparing Central American countries and Mexico. A document analysis was conducted, using official government publications and mass communication channels that provided information on actions taken to control COVID-19, as well as epidemiological reports from each country. The epidemic curve, which reflects confirmed COVID-19 cases per 100,000 inhabitants, was not significantly different between the Central American countries, which mostly implemented border closures and curfews, and Mexico, which did not. Mandatory border closures and restrictions on internal mobility in Central American countries—with the exceptions of Nicaragua, which imposed neither, and Costa Rica, which imposed border controls but only minimal internal restrictions—were found to constitute human rights violations.
  • New Migration’s Gordian Knot: Mexico and the Caravans of the Northern Triangle of Central America

    Núñez García, Silvia; Dávila Pérez, María del Consuelo (Institut de hautes études internationales et du développementInternational Development Policy | Revue internationale de politique de développement, 2022-05-16)
    Migration processes in Mexico are varied and complex; the country sends migrants abroad and receives returnees in addition to migrants in transit and others wishing to settle there. In this sense, Mexico may be considered a global migration hub (a country of origin, reception, transit and destination). This chapter focuses on transit migration and the reception of migrants seeking asylum, with a particular focus on migrant caravans from the Northern Triangle of Central America (Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador) between 2018 and 2020. These caravans, characterised by thousands of people (Kahn, 2018) fleeing their countries of origin due to situations of violence and threats to their personal security—in addition to economic factors—have posed challenges for Mexico’s domestic and foreign policies, especially in terms of its relations with the United States. In this context, we explore the actions and policies introduced to deal with migrants and refugees transiting Mexico, and the impact these have had. Taking mid-2018—the end of Enrique Peña’s presidential term—as the point of departure for our analysis, we examine Mexico’s migration policies more generally, together with the response of President Andrés Manuel López Obrador’s administration to Donald Trump’s immigration policies and the pressure the Trump administration exerted on Mexico to contain the flow of irregular migrants.
  • Política de salud de migrantes internacionales en Chile, 2014-2017

    Wiff, Jossette Iribarne; Benítez, Andrea Fernández; González, Marcela Pezoa; Padilla, Claudia; Chepo, Macarena; Leyva Flores, René (Institut de hautes études internationales et du développementInternational Development Policy | Revue internationale de politique de développement, 2022-05-16)
    A nivel mundial, reconocer de forma igualitaria los derechos de los migrantes es uno de los desafíos más importantes para la sociedad moderna. Este capítulo tiene como objetivo analizar como la Política Nacional de Salud para Migrantes Internacionales (PNSMI, NHPIM en inglés) se establece y se implementa en Chile, así como sus resultados a corto plazo, desde 2014 hasta 2017. Se basa en una revisión de la literatura sobre y derivada de los procesos consultivos realizados en comunidades con altas tasas de movilidad y residencia de migrantes internacionales, y sobre documentos clave relacionados con la Política. Analiza la cobertura de salud del sector público del Fondo Nacional de Salud de Chile (FONASA), la utilización de los servicios de salud y la satisfacción de las necesidades de salud, comparando la población chilena general con la población migrante en Chile, utilizando datos de las Encuestas de Caracterización Socioeconómica Nacional (Encuesta CASEN) de los años 2013, 2015 y 2017. La formulación del PNSMI fue una respuesta a la evidencia generada a través de la consulta y la participación social. Eliminó las barreras legislativas y legales y favoreció la protección financiera a través de la cobertura del FONASA. En el período analizado, el número de migrantes con cobertura FONASA duplicó (de 243 mil a 506 mil); la tasa de uso de servicios de salud aumentó (de 0,81 a 1,36 por cada 100 migrantes); la tasa de egresos hospitalarios se mantuvo estable (3,2 por cada 100 migrantes), aunque el número neto de egresos duplicó; y la proporción de egresos hospitalarios de migrantes sin cobertura FONASA disminuyó de 25,5% a 7,8%. La protección del derecho a la salud de los migrantes internacionales en Chile es un ejemplo claro de traducción efectiva del discurso político en práctica social concreta.
  • Immigrants’ Contribution to Development in the Global South: Comparing Policy Responses to Venezuelan Immigration in Peru and Argentina

    Levaggi, Ariel González; Freier, Luisa Feline (Institut de hautes études internationales et du développementInternational Development Policy | Revue internationale de politique de développement, 2022-05-16)
    By April 2021, Venezuela’s multidimensional crisis had led over 5.6 million of the country’s citizens to emigrate, mostly across South America. This chapter offers a comparative analysis of national policy responses to Venezuelan immigration in Argentina and Peru from a development perspective in the period 2015‒2020. Although the government of each country recognised the potential of disproportionate numbers of highly skilled Venezuelan immigrants, Argentina has been more successful than Peru in offering them legal pathways to immigration and incorporating them into the formal labour market. Our key argument is that Argentina has been able to foster the integration of Venezuelans—in terms of granting regular status, validating academic and professional degrees and providing access to basic social services—for three reasons: first, the lower overall numbers and higher socio-economic characteristics of the migrants; second, Argentina’s progressive legislative immigration framework; and third, the prominent role of civil society actors lobbying for immigrants and pushing for more inclusive public policies. In the case of Peru, the rapid increase in numbers of immigrants has led to a surge in xenophobic public opinion, which has generated pressure to implement non-inclusive policies. The country’s new immigration law lacks institutional consolidation, and there is no strong civil society to act as a counterweight to restrictive policy developments. The chapter contributes to the literature on the migration–development nexus, pointing out the importance of state capacity and civil society when thinking about migration and development in the global South.
  • Attracting Highly Skilled Migrants to Guangzhou, China: A Policy Commentary

    Li, Wei; Ma, Ling; Tan, Yining; Liu, Meixin (Institut de hautes études internationales et du développementInternational Development Policy | Revue internationale de politique de développement, 2022-05-16)
    The scope and the study of international migration have reached unprecedented levels. The UN Global Compact for Safe, Orderly and Regular Migration (GCM) recognises that ‘migration is a multidimensional reality of major relevance for the sustainable development of countries of origin, transit and destination’, and calls for ‘integrat[ing] migration into development planning and sectoral policies at local, national, regional and global levels’. Such policies may include targeting individuals who are highly skilled/highly educated or lower skilled/less educated to fulfil different developmental goals. China, with its globalised economy, rapid economic growth, and wealth accumulation in recent decades embodies such a trend. With recruitment policies for top-tier Chinese returnees and foreign professionals, China has become an emerging destination for overseas talent. However, there is a lack of city-level/local-level analysis of the roles that local incentives and policies play when people choose a destination city. We aim to fill this gap by focusing on city-level talent recruitment and retention policies in Guangzhou, the capital of China’s Guangdong Province. In this policy commentary, we will 1) Compare and contrast the talent recruitment and retention policies instituted and implemented by the City of Guangzhou to attract Chinese returnees and foreign professionals in the last two decades; and 2) Assess the effectiveness and fairness of such policies, and their implications for other areas and countries in the global ‘race for talent’.
  • Governing African Migration in Morocco: The Challenge of Positive Desecuritisation

    Abourabi, Yousra (Institut de hautes études internationales et du développementInternational Development Policy | Revue internationale de politique de développement, 2022-05-16)
    As part of its new African integration policy, implemented under the reign of Mohammed VI, Morocco has developed a new migration policy. Traditionally, the Moroccan approach to migration was focused on the management of the Moroccan diaspora. Today, despite the low percentage of African migrants compared to European migrants in Morocco, special attention is paid to the regularisation of migrants coming from the South. The Kingdom of Morocco has therefore become an African migratory crossroads, not only for transit migration but also for incoming migration. While the European Union is trying to externalise the control of its borders to Maghreb countries, Morocco is striving to spread a positive and desecuritising discourse on migration to differentiate itself from Europe. This desire for differentiation is not an easy path, as this article demonstrates. It is motivated by the Moroccan will to affirm the African dimension of its identity and no longer be considered as a purely Arab-Muslim country looking to the Mediterranean region. To this end, Morocco has committed itself, as a ‘champion of migration’ within the African Union, to the dissemination of its own migration model over the continent and to the defence of an African vision of migration centred on continental mobility, promoting migration as a path to development and combating preconceived ideas about migration as a security problem. Overall, Morocco’s foreign policy in Africa has further encouraged sub-Saharan migration, which in turn has had many positive effects. In addition to the cosmopolitanisation of several Moroccan cities, the new migration policy seems to illustrate a boost in public policies and a willingness to overcome European normative transfers through diplomatic negotiation.
  • The National Health Policy for International Migrants in Chile, 2014–17

    Wiff, Jossette Iribarne; Benítez, Andrea Fernández; González, Marcela Pezoa; Padilla, Claudia; Chepo, Macarena; Leyva Flores, René (Institut de hautes études internationales et du développementInternational Development Policy | Revue internationale de politique de développement, 2022-05-16)
    At the global level, the equal recognition of migrant rights is among the most important challenges for modern society. This chapter aims to analyse the formulation and implementation processes of the National Health Policy for International Migrants in Chile (NHPIM), as well as its short-term results, from 2014 to 2017. It is based on a review of the literature on and deriving from the consultative processes performed in communities with high mobility and residency rates for international migrants, and key documents related to the Policy. It analyses public sector health coverage from the National Health Fund of Chile (Fondo Nacional de Salud, or FONASA), health service usage, and fulfilment of health needs, comparing the general Chilean population to the migrant population in Chile using data from the National Socioeconomic Characterization Survey (CASEN Survey) from 2013, 2015 and 2017. The formulation of the NHPIM was a response to evidence generated through consultation and social participation. It eliminated legislative and legal barriers, and favoured financial protection through coverage by FONASA. Over the period analysed, the number of migrants with FONASA coverage doubled (from 243,000 to 506,000); the rate of healthcare service usage increased (from 0.81 to 1.36 per 100 migrants); the rate of hospital discharges remained steady (3.2 per 100 migrants), although the net number of discharges doubled; and the proportion of migrant hospital discharges without FONASA coverage fell from 25.5 per cent to 7.8 per cent. The protection of the right to health for international migrants in Chile is a prime example of the effective translation of political discourse into concrete social practice.
  • Multilateral Approaches to Mobility in the Middle East and North Africa Region

    Naujoks, Daniel (Institut de hautes études internationales et du développementInternational Development Policy | Revue internationale de politique de développement, 2022-05-16)
    Development plans increasingly integrate aspects of migration and displacement, reflecting the countless links between sustainable development and human mobility. To understand the incorporation of issues related to human mobility into development plans and policies, this chapter analyses all current United Nations Development Assistance Frameworks (UNDAFs) in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA). The MENA region is characterised by high levels of outmigration and displacement, transit migration, immigration, and hosts a large share of the world’s refugees. UNDAFs – planning documents that provide a system-wide overview of key United Nations (UN) activities and functions at the country level – provide a promising platform to investigate linkages between migration, displacement, human development, multilateral and interagency cooperation, and the politics of development aid and international relations. To assess how exactly UN development plans address immigration, emigration, transit migration, internal and international displacement, diaspora engagement and remittances, this chapter introduces the Index of Mobility Inclusion (IMI) which measures the intensity, modality, and dimensionality of how mobility has been integrated into development plans. Based on an analysis of all current UNDAFs, the component and aggregate IMI levels show varying degrees of mobility inclusion. A comparison of the three IMI components for all 14 plans in the MENA region reveals that mobility-related policies include a broad range of public policy sectors and focus on various target populations. This paper concludes by offering initial insights into and hypotheses on what determines whether mobility is included in UN development plans.
  • El nuevo nudo gordiano de la migración: México y las caravanas del Triángulo Norte de Centroamérica

    Núñez García, Silvia; Dávila Pérez, María del Consuelo (Institut de hautes études internationales et du développementInternational Development Policy | Revue internationale de politique de développement, 2022-05-16)
    Los procesos migratorios en México son complejos y diversos, ya que contemplan tanto la expulsión, como el retorno, el tránsito y la recepción. En este sentido México puede ser considerado un centro migratorio global (país de origen, recepción, tránsito y destino), por lo que este trabajo aborda la migración de tránsito y la recepción de migrantes solicitando asilo, especialmente en la dimensión actual de las caravanas de migrantes del Triángulo del Norte (Guatemala, Honduras y El Salvador). Estas caravanas, compuestas de miles de personas (Kahn, 2018) que huyen de sus países de origen por situaciones de violencia y amenazas a su seguridad personal –además de factores económicos– ingresan al territorio mexicano incrementándose considerablemente a partir de 2018, representando desafíos para nuestra política interna y externa, en particular aquella que nos vincula con los Estados Unidos. En este contexto, exploramos la pregunta de cuáles han sido las acciones o políticas propuestas por México y su impacto. Tomando como punto de partida de nuestro análisis mediados de 2018 –el final del mandato presidencial de Enrique Peña–, examinamos las políticas migratorias de México de forma general, junto con la respuesta de la administración del presidente Andrés Manuel López Obrador a las políticas migratorias de Donald Trump y la presión que la administración Trump ejerció sobre México para contener el flujo de migrantes irregulares.
  • Appendix | Attracting Highly Skilled Migrants to Guangzhou, China: A Policy Commentary

    Li, Wei; Ma, Ling; Tan, Yining; Liu, Meixin (Institut de hautes études internationales et du développementInternational Development Policy | Revue internationale de politique de développement, 2022-05-16)
    Appendix to the chapter Wei Li, Ling Ma, Yining Tan and Meixin Liu (2022) Attracting Highly Skilled Migrants to Guangzhou, China: A Policy Commentary, International Development Policy | Revue internationale de politique de développement 14 | 2022, URL: http://journals.openedition.org/poldev/4825
  • Migration and Development in Egypt—A Holistic View

    Tsourapas, Gerasimos (Institut de hautes études internationales et du développementInternational Development Policy | Revue internationale de politique de développement, 2022-05-16)
    The importance of labour migration as an instrument for states’ development has been a key consideration for a range of countries across the global South. Egypt was one of the first states across North Africa and the Middle East to establish specific policies on the governance of labour migration in the context of social and economic development, which have been effective since the early 1970s. This chapter aims to identify the range of policies introduced by the Egyptian state with the aim of governing migration, and to examine the distinct contributions of cross-border socioeconomic mobility to development. Drawing on a range of primary and secondary sources in Arabic and English, as well as extensive fieldwork in Cairo, the chapter points to the fact that Egyptian public policies aim to attract far more than economic remittances; and demonstrates how Egypt approaches migration in a holistic manner, seeking to maximise the benefits from citizens’ emigration and their time abroad, while also encouraging return skilled migration.
  • ¿El cierre de fronteras y el control de la Covid-19? El caso de Centroamérica y México

    Leyva Flores, René; Rojas, Karol; Aracena, Belkis (Institut de hautes études internationales et du développementInternational Development Policy | Revue internationale de politique de développement, 2022-05-16)
    Una de las primeras prácticas usadas para el control de la epidemia de Covid-19, a nivel mundial, fue la restricción de la movilidad poblacional, mediante el cierre de aeropuertos, fronteras terrestres y marítimas, restricción de movilidad y el confinamiento poblacional obligatorio. Estas acciones no exceptuaron a América Latina, ya que varios países de la región, incluido Centroamérica, implementaron, entre otras, el cierre de fronteras y el denominado toque de queda. Entre tanto, otros, como México, optaron por la implementación de medidas de carácter persuasivo, que apelaban a la buena voluntad ciudadana, mediante el llamado a quedarse en casa, el lavado frecuente de manos y la provisión de información diaria sobre la situación de la epidemia. Se podría suponer que estas intervenciones -en extremos divergentes-, tengan efectos distintos sobre la evolución de la pandemia. Por ello, el presente trabajo tuvo como objetivo analizar las medidas implementadas en Centroamérica y México, y su relación con la evolución de la pandemia de Covid-19, (por tendencia del número de casos), comparando los países en Centroamérica y México. Se utilizaron fuentes documentales provenientes de publicaciones gubernamentales y de informaciones recogidas en medios de comunicación, que daban información sobre las acciones realizadas para controlar la Covid-19 así como los informes epidemiológicos de cada país. La curva epidemiológica, que resume la tasa de casos confirmados por 100,000 habitantes, no muestra diferencias entre países centroamericanos, que implementaron el cierre de fronteras y toque de queda, y México, donde no se implementaron estas acciones. El cierre obligatorio de fronteras y las restricciones a la movilidad interna en los países centroamericanos -con la excepción de Nicaragua, que no impuso ninguna de las dos cosas, y Costa Rica, que impuso controles fronterizos pero sólo restricciones internas mínimas- fueron considerados como violaciones de los derechos humanos.
  • Multilevel Governance of Migration for Sustainable Development: Perspectives from the Global Souths

    Degila, Dêlidji Eric; Marina Valle, Valeria (Institut de hautes études internationales et du développementInternational Development Policy | Revue internationale de politique de développement, 2022-05-16)
    This chapter introduces the thematic volume Governing Migration for Development from the Global Souths: Challenges and Opportunities. It presents the aims and scope of the Volume, and a discussion on contributions to migration studies from the global Souths, in particular analysing positive and negative aspects of the multilevel governance of migration. It also provides an overview of a broad conceptualisation of sustainable development through five dimensions—people, planet, profit, peace and partnerships—before highlighting the main contributions of the individual chapters. Finally, we conclude by underlining the insights brought by a multiplicity of perspectives from the global Souths to an analysis of the complex configuration of migration governance.
  • Foreword to ‘Governing Migration for Development’

    Institut de hautes études internationales et du développementInternational Development Policy | Revue internationale de politique de développement, 2022-05-16
    We are pleased to introduce the 14th thematic edition of International Development Policy, ‘Governing Migration for Development from the Global Souths: Challenges and Opportunities’. This volume presents a number of research projects and case studies from the global South that illustrate how different public policies and legal frameworks on all levels, from the subnational to the international, affect migration positively and negatively. It also addresses the links between sustainable develo...
  • Philippine Nurse Migration: Assessing Vulnerabilities and Accessing Opportunities during the COVID-19 Pandemic

    Lind Elmaco, Jenny (Institut de hautes études internationales et du développementInternational Development Policy | Revue internationale de politique de développement, 2022-05-16)
    This chapter studies Filipino nurses’ skilled migration, factoring in their lived experiences during the onslaught of the COVID-19 crisis. Anchored in the targets of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), the chapter contributes to the existing literature and policy discussion on nurse mobility in healthcare during a global crisis and on the nexus between migration and development. A key aim is to underscore the particular vulnerabilities of nurses as frontliners in both their host and home countries. Ultimately, the goal is to provide a Policy Comment that takes into consideration the question of ‘brain drain’ while also attempting to address the challenges the country faces as it seeks to promote better conditions for its highly skilled medical workforce and creating a more nuanced understanding of a nurse’s role in public and global health during a pandemic. The qualitative study described in this chapter uses semi-structured, open-ended interviews with Filipino nurses working in different parts of the world to elicit exploratory perspectives and understand respondents’ views on nurse migration and policy.
  • Governing Migration for Development from the Global Souths

    Abourabi, Yousra; Agosto, Gabriela; Aracena, Belkis; Benítez, Andrea Fernández; Chepo, Macarena; Coffie, Amanda; Crush, Jonathan; Dávila Pérez, María del Consuelo; Degila, Dêlidji Eric; Freier, Luisa Feline (Institut de hautes études internationales et du développementInternational Development Policy | Revue internationale de politique de développement, 2022-05-16)
    The 14th thematic volume of International Development Policy provides perspectives through case studies from the global South(s) focusing on the challenges and opportunities of governing migration on multiple levels: the subnational, national, regional and international. It explores existing and new policies and frameworks in terms of their successes and best practices, and looks at them through the lens of additional challenges, such as those brought on by the COVID-19 pandemic, the rise of nationalisms and an increase in xenophobia. The chapters also take the ‘5 Ps’ approach to sustainable development (people, planet, prosperity, peace and partnerships) and assess how migration policies serve sustainable development in a rapidly evolving context. Guest Editors: Dêlidji Eric Degila and Valeria Marina Valle. ‘A powerful and challenging collection that offers a depth of empirical and conceptual insight in order to demonstrate the need both to think about and understand international migration from perspectives of the ‘global south’.’ Andrew Geddes Professor of Migration Studies/Director of the Migration Policy Centre, Migration Policy Centre / Robert Schuman Centre ‘Governing Migration for Development from the Global Souths is an excellent volume that addresses and unpacks the governance-migration-sustainable development nexus in the global Souths. It maps distinct ways in which global South states are involved in and create new forms of migration governance that tend to be overlooked in analyses of multilevel governance that primarily reflect the concerns of the global North. The present volume is a must read for anyone interested in the role of the global Souths in migration governance.‘ Marianne H. Marchand Research Chair in International Relations, Universidad de las Américas Puebla Cite the volume: Dêlidji Eric Degila and Valeria Marina Valle (eds.) (2022) Governing Migration for Development from the Global South, International Development Policy | Revue internationale de politique de développement, 14 (Geneva, Boston: Graduate Institute Publications, Brill-Nijhoff). DOI: 10.4000/poldev.4544 (paperback version: forthcoming, Autumn 2022).

View more