• Teaching an Invisible Subject: How are we Educating Faculty about Copyright?

      Zerkee, Jennifer (Clemson University Press, 2018-02-26)
      Copyright can be an invisible issue for instructors because infringement or improper use of copyright-protected material will not impede teaching. Copyright law is nuanced and open to interpretation; it is not always clear whether a particular action is compliant or not. This poster will share the results of the presenter’s Canada-wide survey of university copyright administrators, exploring institutions’ provision of copyright education to instructors. The presenter found more questions rather than answers as a result of the survey. Most respondents do no assessment of their copyright instruction, and instead are comfortable relying on experience, questions from faculty, and anecdotal evidence to form an impression of instructors’ familiarity with copyright rules. Is informal appraisal adequate for ensuring that libraries and copyright offices are fulfilling their responsibility to encourage and enable the confident and lawful use of copyright-protected material? What other evidence could be gathered to inform copyright administrators’ efforts? This poster will encourage participants to think about copyright education at their institutions, will share the results of the survey, including approaches being taken by universities across Canada, and will share Simon Fraser University's approaches to instructor education
    • Teaching Copyright Law through Participatory Involvement in an Unconference Setting

      McCormick, Amanda; Adams, Stephanie A.; Dunbar, Hope; Mclean-Plunkett, Sarah (The University of Kansas, 2020-04-22)
      An “unconference” is an attempt by librarians and other professionals to work outside of the traditional conference model. Presenters are encouraged to break out of traditional modes of presentation and try new methods of engaging with the participants. We submitted an idea for a session focused on demystifying domestic and international copyright law and discussing how the law affects libraries and archives. Modern librarianship demands at least a basic understanding of copyright and intellectual property issues, and librarians have reported that they lack training and knowledge in this area. We determined that we did not want to present a formal lecture on copyright in libraries, especially given the freedom and intellectual experimentation encouraged by an unconference setting. Instead, we determined that the best way to present copyright principles would be to share examples of real-life scenarios with the participants and assist them in applying the principles of copyright law to those situations. We hoped that participants would build confidence in their ability to respond when copyright issues arose at the workplace. This paper outlines the approach we took to prepare and present this unconventional session, and it includes an assessment of the results.
    • The 2017 Kraemer Copyright Conference Proceedings: An Introduction

      Myers, Carla S. (Clemson University Press, 2018-02-26)
      An Editorial introduction to the proceedings from the 2017 Kraemer Copyright Conference.
    • The Rights Statement Selection Tool

      Galson, Gabriel; Karl, Brandy (The University of Kansas, 2020-04-22)
      Through the standardized rights statements it provides, RightsStatements.org allows institutions to clearly communicate the copyright status of digitized cultural heritage works, promoting their reuse. However, it can be tricky for institutions to determine correct statement usage through the site without additional context. The Rights Statement Selection Tool [bit.ly/RSSTOOL] is an interactive infographic that serves to visually explain the statement selection workflow, allowing a copyright novice to identify the correct statement through decision tree alone. This legal tool lets cultural heritage institutions assign rights statement review work to non-experts, potentially increasing the number of items that can be evaluated. It’s meant to be integrated into cataloging workflows: clickable links lead to each statement’s URI page, and it can be viewed in a browser alongside the RightsStatements.org site. The Tool serves as a complete visual reference to the statements: each is covered and explained. It aggregates relevant resources and serves as a structural bridge between related copyright status determination charts and Creative Commons charts. Donation agreements–often a source of confusion for rights statements reviewers–are covered as well. The Tool is, by design, as agnostic to national law as possible. The US-centered copyright status determination charts that feed into it (such as the Hirtle and Sunstein charts) could easily be swapped for resources reflecting other countries’ national law; the RightsStatements.org logic that it covers would remain unchanged, and so would the chart. As the RightsStatements.org standard goes global, this tool can be translated, adapted, and re-used beyond the US.  
    • The Search for a Service Model of Copyright Best Practices in Academic Libraries

      Lewin-Lane, Stephanie; Dethloff, Nora; Grob, Julie; Townes, Adam; Lierman, Ashley (Clemson University Press, 2018-06-13)
      To add to their suite of available copyright services and to create a service model of best practices, the University of Houston Libraries’ newly formed Copyright Team initiated a literature review and performed an environmental scan of peer institutions’ copyright policies and procedures. This article outlines the impetus and results for both studies and offers future considerations.
    • Tried and True: Fair Use Tales for the Telling

      McCleskey, Sarah E.; Selby, Courtney (Clemson University Press, 2019-03-12)
      On Thursday, March 1, 2018, the Harvard Library Office for Scholarly Communication hosted “Tried and True: Fair Use Tales for the Telling,” a one-day program celebrating Harvard’s Fifth Anniversary of Fair Use Week. Leading fair use scholars and practitioners shared their stories and engaged in lively discussion about the powerful and flexible fair use provision of the Copyright Act and its applications. Topics included treatment of the fair use doctrine in recent jurisprudence, conflicts over the use of visual works in remixes and mash-ups, academic work and social commentary, filmmaking, controlled digital lending practices in libraries, software preservation, and more. This article discusses the examples and ideas presented during the program and offers resources for further study in the application of fair use.
    • Turning Wrongs into Rights: Implementation of RightsStatements.org at Washington University

      Zeller, Micah (Clemson University Press, 2018-02-26)
      As many librarians who work with digital collections know, ambiguous or meaningless rights statements can cause confusion and limit downstream use of materials. Following DPLA and Europeana's lead in drafting simple, standardized terms that help metadata contributors more effectively communicate copyright and re-use status of digital objects, we evaluated materials in 50+ exhibits at Washington University Libraries in order to assign each an appropriate statement from RightsStatements.org and help facilitate the same for other contributors to the Missouri Hub. This poster focuses on the implementation of project statements and recommendations. Its purpose is to share and discuss practical steps and workflows that organizations can use to assign statements to materials in their own collections. This is rooted in the perspective of a medium-sized organization, with fairly typical staffing, that contributes to DPLA via participation in a regional service hub, but may be relevant to platforms and institutions of all types. The goal is to provide concrete help with evaluating the underlying status of items by collection and deciding which statement to apply. This may involve risk assessment and/or judgment calls, and the poster outlines a few factors that were considered and how decisions were made.
    • Video Streaming Licenses: Using a Decision Tree and Workflow Chart

      Towery, Stephanie S; Price, Amanda K; Cowen, Karen E (Clemson University Press, 2019-03-14)
      This paper documents the results of a three-year process at a university library to develop a workflow for acquiring streaming video for use in face-to-face, hybrid, and online courses. The authors of this paper created two tools that guide their library in acquiring streaming video: the Streaming Resources Decision Tree (SRDT) and the Streaming Video Workflow Chart (SVWC). This paper describes the SRDT in depth, and the SVWC in brief. This paper describes the legal rationale behind the SRDT, which explores the limits of the right to fair use in U.S. copyright law.
    • Workshop on Models for Copyright Education in Information Literacy

      Hinchliffe, Lisa Janicke (Clemson University Press, 2019-07-09)
      The Workshop was organized the IFLA Information Literacy Section and the IFLA Copyright and Other Legal Matters Advisory Committee to provide a forum for discussing models for education on copyright, licensing, and related legal matters within the framework of library information literacy programs. With more than 14 countries represented, the papers and discussions were far-ranging and comprehensive, touching on issues of pedagogy, instructional design, learning theory, author rights, copyright limitations and exceptions, applications of the law nationally, international copyright, open access, and education for library and information science practitioners. The papers in this special issue started as presentations at the workshop but were further developed based on feedback and then through peer review before publication.
    • Workshop on Models for Copyright Education in Information Literacy: An Initiative of the International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions

      Hinchliffe, Lisa Janicke (The University of Kansas Libraries, 2019-07-09)
      The Workshop was organized the IFLA Information Literacy Section and the IFLA Copyright and Other Legal Matters Advisory Committee to provide a forum for discussing models for education on copyright, licensing, and related legal matters within the framework of library information literacy programs. With more than 14 countries represented, the papers and discussions were far-ranging and comprehensive, touching on issues of pedagogy, instructional design, learning theory, author rights, copyright limitations and exceptions, applications of the law nationally, international copyright, open access, and education for library and information science practitioners. The papers in this special issue started as presentations at the workshop but were further developed based on feedback and then through peer review before publication.