The Journal of Copyright in Education and Librarianship is bi-annually published in the spring and fall. It is a peer-reviewed open-access publication for original articles, reviews and case studies that analyze or describe the strategies, partnerships and impact of copyright law on public, school, academic, and digital libraries, archives, museums, and research institutions and their educational initiatives. //The Journal of Copyright in Education and Librarianship is bi-annually published in the spring and fall. It is a peer-reviewed open-access publication for original articles, reviews and case studies that analyze or describe the strategies, partnerships and impact of copyright law on public, school, academic, and digital libraries, archives, museums, and research institutions and their educational initiatives.This journal provides a focused forum for library practitioners, educators, and attorneys to share ideas, strategies, research and pragmatic explorations of the following:The effects of copyright law on education and librarianship,The application of exemptions to copyright law in libraries and other educational settings, Current litigation and lawmaking efforts, and advocacy on behalf of all users, The practical implications of current and proposed copyright law, both in the United States and internationally, Initiatives to educate campus communities to make good faith copyright decisions and evaluations,The development of copyright policies and best practices to help guide users in the application of copyright law and related intellectual property laws, Practice articles on implementing new services within the framework of the law, Copyright in an increasingly online educational environment, Licensing and the impact of licenses on education and libraries, Pedagogy of teaching about copyright.

Novedades

The Globethics.net library contains articles of the Journal of Copyright in Education and Librarianship as of vol. 1(2016) to current.

Envíos recientes

  • Open Access Legislation and Regulation in the United States: Implications for Higher Education

    Chaudhary, Anjam; Irwin, Kathy; Hoa Khoa Nguyen, David (The University of Kansas Libraries, 2020-11-30)
    Accessing quality research when not part of an academic institution can be challenging. Dating back to the 1980s, open access (OA) was a response to journal publishers who restricted access to publications by requiring a subscription and limited access to knowledge. Although the OA movement seeks to remove costly barriers to accessing research, especially when funded by state and federal governments, it remains the subject of continuous debates. After providing a brief overview of OA, this article summarizes OA statutory and regulatory developments at the federal and state levels regarding free and open access to research. It compares similarities and differences among enacted and proposed legislation and describes the advantages and disadvantages of these laws. It analyzes the effects of these laws in higher education, especially on university faculty regarding tenure and promotion decisions as well as intellectual property rights to provide recommendations and best practices regarding the future of legislation and regulation in the United States.
  • Book Review: Drafting Copyright Exceptions: From the Law in Books to the Law in Action

    Morrison, Chris (The University of Kansas Libraries, 2021-03-19)
    Drafting Copyright Exceptions: From the Law in Books to the Law in Action by Emily Hudson is essential reading for anyone responsible for managing copyright in libraries and educational and research institutions. Hudson’s monograph presents insights from thousands of hours of empirical research with hundreds of copyright practitioners in the cultural heritage sector. It reveals important findings about the way that copyright exceptions are interpreted in practice and the implications this has for the formation of norms and the drafting of copyright exceptions.
  • Opinion: CASE Act will Harm Researchers and Freedom of Inquiry

    Benson, Sara; Vollmer, Timothy (The University of Kansas Libraries, 2021-03-18)
    The Copyright Alternative in Small-Claims Enforcement Act of 2020 (CASE Act) was swept into law during the final days of 2020 as a part of the 5,500 page federal spending bill. In theory, the CASE Act aims to provide a venue for individual creators (such as photographers, graphic artists, musicians) to address smaller copyright infringement claims without spending the time and money required to pursue a copyright infringement lawsuit in Federal court. In reality, however, this additional bureaucratic structure created outside of the traditional court system is fraught with problems that will mostly incentivize large, well-resourced rightsholders or overly litigious copyright owners to take advantage of the system. At the same time, it will confuse and harm innocuous users of content, who may not understand the complexities of copyright law, and who do not know whether or how to respond to a notice of infringement via this small claims process. From our perspective, it will chill users who rely on crucial statutory exceptions to copyright, such as fair use, in their research and teaching activities.
  • 2018: A Streaming Video Odyssey

    Perry, Anali; Grondin, Karen (The University of Kansas Libraries, 2020-09-01)
    In this case study, we reflect on our journey through a major revision of our streaming video reserve guidelines, informed by an environmental scan of comparable library services and current copyright best practices. Once the guidelines were revised, we developed an implementation plan for communicating changes and developing training materials to both instructors and internal library staff. We share our navigation strategies, obstacles faced, lessons learned, and ongoing challenges. Finally, we map out some of our future directions for improving and streamlining our services.  
  • The Rights Statement Selection Tool

    Galson, Gabriel; Karl, Brandy (The University of Kansas, 2020-04-22)
    Through the standardized rights statements it provides, RightsStatements.org allows institutions to clearly communicate the copyright status of digitized cultural heritage works, promoting their reuse. However, it can be tricky for institutions to determine correct statement usage through the site without additional context. The Rights Statement Selection Tool [bit.ly/RSSTOOL] is an interactive infographic that serves to visually explain the statement selection workflow, allowing a copyright novice to identify the correct statement through decision tree alone. This legal tool lets cultural heritage institutions assign rights statement review work to non-experts, potentially increasing the number of items that can be evaluated. It’s meant to be integrated into cataloging workflows: clickable links lead to each statement’s URI page, and it can be viewed in a browser alongside the RightsStatements.org site. The Tool serves as a complete visual reference to the statements: each is covered and explained. It aggregates relevant resources and serves as a structural bridge between related copyright status determination charts and Creative Commons charts. Donation agreements–often a source of confusion for rights statements reviewers–are covered as well. The Tool is, by design, as agnostic to national law as possible. The US-centered copyright status determination charts that feed into it (such as the Hirtle and Sunstein charts) could easily be swapped for resources reflecting other countries’ national law; the RightsStatements.org logic that it covers would remain unchanged, and so would the chart. As the RightsStatements.org standard goes global, this tool can be translated, adapted, and re-used beyond the US.  
  • Teaching Copyright Law through Participatory Involvement in an Unconference Setting

    McCormick, Amanda; Adams, Stephanie A.; Dunbar, Hope; Mclean-Plunkett, Sarah (The University of Kansas, 2020-04-22)
    An “unconference” is an attempt by librarians and other professionals to work outside of the traditional conference model. Presenters are encouraged to break out of traditional modes of presentation and try new methods of engaging with the participants. We submitted an idea for a session focused on demystifying domestic and international copyright law and discussing how the law affects libraries and archives. Modern librarianship demands at least a basic understanding of copyright and intellectual property issues, and librarians have reported that they lack training and knowledge in this area. We determined that we did not want to present a formal lecture on copyright in libraries, especially given the freedom and intellectual experimentation encouraged by an unconference setting. Instead, we determined that the best way to present copyright principles would be to share examples of real-life scenarios with the participants and assist them in applying the principles of copyright law to those situations. We hoped that participants would build confidence in their ability to respond when copyright issues arose at the workplace. This paper outlines the approach we took to prepare and present this unconventional session, and it includes an assessment of the results.
  • Copyright, Fair Use, and Creative Commons: An Active-Learning Exercise for Studio Art Students

    Boston, Arthur Jason (The University of Kansas, 2020-01-15)
    This article describes an active-learning exercise intended to help teach copyright, fair use, and Creative Commons licenses. In the exercise students use a worksheet to draw original pictures, create derivative pictures on tracing paper, select Creative Commons licenses, and explore commercial usage, fair use, and copyright infringement. Librarian-instructors may find the completed worksheets to be useful aids to supplement copyright lectures; student perspectives will be integral because they are generating the examples used in discussion. Although a scholarly communication librarian developed this exercise to help introduce some basic copyright information to an undergraduate studio art and design class, the exercise can be performed in a general educational setting.
  • Checking Rights

    Baker, Stewart; Kunda, Sue (Journal of Copyright in Education & Librarianship, 2019-11-30)
    Institutional repository (IR) managers often find themselves providing copyright guidance to faculty who wish to self-archive their published scholarship or to students depositing theses and dissertations. As IR managers may not be copyright experts themselves, making determinations and checking rights can be difficult and time-consuming. This article is intended as a practical guide to describe common types of material that can be placed in an IR as well as potential copyright issues and other considerations for each type. Material types covered include book chapters, journal articles, conference proceedings, student papers, electronic theses and dissertations, research data sets, historical and archival materials, and oral histories. Underlying issues such as copyright ownership, work made for hire, and the legal definition of publication are also discussed. For easier reference, the appendix contains a chart with brief descriptions of issues and resources.
  • Book Review: Copyright Conversations: Rights Literacy in a Digital World

    Freeman, Amie Dillard (The University of Kansas, 2020-01-02)
    The topic of copyright is rarely far from a librarian's mind. Practitioners must navigate creator and user rights within the constraints of complex license and contract agreements in digital environments. Librarians have to understand, explain, educate, and apply copyright law on a regular basis, often without formal training. Copyright Conversations: Rights Literacy in a Digital World is a notable work that endeavors to summarize, explain, and comment on many of the complicated copyright-related topics that librarians encounter in the digital realm.
  • Copyright in the Institutional Repository

    Baker, Stewart; Kunda, Sue (Journal of Copyright in Education & Librarianship, 2019-11-30)
    Institutional repository (IR) managers often find themselves providing copyright guidance to faculty who wish to self-archive their published scholarship or to students depositing theses and dissertations. As IR managers may not be copyright experts themselves, making determinations and checking rights can be difficult and time-consuming. This article is intended as a practical guide to describe common types of material that can be placed in an IR as well as potential copyright issues and other considerations for each type. Material types covered include book chapters, journal articles, conference proceedings, student papers, electronic theses and dissertations, research data sets, historical and archival materials, and oral histories. Underlying issues such as copyright ownership, work made for hire, and the legal definition of publication are also discussed. For easier reference, the appendix contains a chart with brief descriptions of issues and resources.
  • Cracking the Copyright Dilemma in Software Preservation

    Butler, Brandon; Aufderheide, Patricia; Jaszi, Peter; Cox, Krista (Journal of Copyright in Education & Librarianship, 2019-11-05)
    Copyright problems may inhibit the crucially important work of preserving legacy software. Such software is worthy of study in its own right because it is critical to accessing digital culture and expression. Preservation work is essential for communicating across boundaries of the past and present in a digital era. Software preservationists in the United States have addressed their copyright problems by developing a code of best practices in employing fair use. Their work is an example of how collective action by users of law changes the norms and beliefs about law, which can in turn change the law itself insofar as the law takes account of community norms and practices. The work of creating the code involved facilitators who are communication, information sciences, and legal scholars and practitioners. Thus, the creation of the code is also an example of crossing the boundaries between technology and policy research.
  • Integrating Copyright in the Curriculum: A Study of LIS Courses of Central Universities of India

    Thapa, Neelam (Journal of Copyright in Education & Librarianship, 2019-10-25)
    This research aims to study the library and information science (LIS) curriculum presently followed in the central universities of India to identify the ways in which it incorporates copyright information. The central universities offering LIS programs were identified and the curricula and syllabi of these LIS programs were downloaded from the universities’ official websites. A detailed content analysis of the curricula and syllabi shows that there is no uniformity in the names of the courses taught and the course content in LIS programs of different universities. However, copyright has been included in the curriculum as part of a course in most of the universities. Based on the analysis suggestions have been made for the inclusion of copyright concepts in the curricula of LIS programs.
  • Academic Special Collections and the Myths of Copyright

    Schultz, Teresa Auch; Miller, Dana (Journal of Copyright in Education & Librarianship, 2019-10-13)
    This study compares the copyright and use policy statements posted on the websites of the special collections of Association of Research Libraries member libraries. In spring 2018, 99 academic special collections websites were viewed, and data was collected based on the following: 1) presence and content of a general copyright statement; 2) mention of copyright owners besides the special collections; 3) presence and accuracy of statements regarding fair use and public domain; 4) policies for patron-made copies; 5) whether the special collections required its permission and/or the copyright owner’s permission to publish; 6) whether any use or license fees were charged and how clearly fees were presented. Authors analyzed whether these policies reflect copyright law or went beyond it, unnecessarily restricting the use of materials or imposing fees where rights are in question. A majority of the sites included general copyright statements, mentioned other copyright owners, and mentioned fair use, but only a minority mentioned the public domain. Just more than half restricted how patrons could use patron-made copies. About half required the special collections’ permission to publish a copy, and a fifth said any third-party owner’s permission was also required for publication.
  • Digital Cultural Heritage and Wikimedia Commons Licenses:

    Kelly, Elizabeth Joan (Journal of Copyright in Education & Librarianship, 2019-10-13)
    Cultural heritage institutions can contribute to public knowledge and increase awareness of their collections by uploading digital objects to Wikimedia Commons for use on Wikipedia and other Wikimedia Foundation projects. However, prior research has established the difficulty of and/or hesitation by many cultural heritage institutions in clearly and accurately labeling the copyright status of their born-digital and digitized collections. With this knowledge, how likely is it that digital cultural heritage will be findable and usable on Wikimedia Commons? This study seeks to determine how accurate rights statements for cultural heritage objects on Wikimedia Commons are, and whether inaccuracies can be linked to problematic rights statements in cultural heritage digital libraries or whether the inaccuracies stem from Wikimedia Commons. By evaluating the rights statements, licenses, and sources for 308 Wikimedia Commons objects from 57 cultural heritage organizations and comparing that information to corresponding licenses from digital libraries, we can begin to develop best practices and educational needs for digital librarians, archives, museum curators, and Wikipedians alike to improve the user experience for those using digital cultural heritage on Wikimedia projects.  
  • Copyright Online Mini-Series: A Flipped Learning Approach to Disseminating Copyright Knowledge to Subject Liaison Librarians

    Benson, Sara Rachel (Clemson University Press, 2019-07-09)
    In the digital age copyright literacy is in high demand. The Association of College and Research Libraries included copyright literacy as a core component of information literacy for higher education in its Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education, which explicitly describes an “information has value” component, including copyright knowledge. However, even at an institution fortunate enough to have a copyright librarian, that one person cannot attend every single information-literacy session on campus that is presented in affiliation with the library. Thus the copyright librarian must form bridges to the rest of campus, and one of the best ways to do so is through collaboration with subject liaison librarians. So far this article has not revealed any groundbreaking revelations—librarians collaborate frequently to make the best use of the talents and resources available to them. What is more novel is the suggestion made herein for copyright librarians to adopt the flipped learning model; in particular, to facilitate liaison sessions.
  • Workshop on Models for Copyright Education in Information Literacy

    Hinchliffe, Lisa Janicke (Clemson University Press, 2019-07-09)
    The Workshop was organized the IFLA Information Literacy Section and the IFLA Copyright and Other Legal Matters Advisory Committee to provide a forum for discussing models for education on copyright, licensing, and related legal matters within the framework of library information literacy programs. With more than 14 countries represented, the papers and discussions were far-ranging and comprehensive, touching on issues of pedagogy, instructional design, learning theory, author rights, copyright limitations and exceptions, applications of the law nationally, international copyright, open access, and education for library and information science practitioners. The papers in this special issue started as presentations at the workshop but were further developed based on feedback and then through peer review before publication.
  • Library and Information Science Curriculum in a Changing Professional Landscape: The Case of Copyright Education in the United States

    Kawooya, Dick; Ferullo, Donna; Lipinski, Tomas (Clemson University Press, 2019-07-12)
    Despite the importance placed on copyright and intellectual property literacy by the American Library Association, as evidenced in the accreditation standards, issues pertaining to copyright education remain marginal in the library and information science (LIS) curriculum and research. Today, copyright intersects with every library and information service in any type of information institution, yet few librarians get copyright training as part of the formal LIS curriculum in library schools. Lack of copyright education leaves many librarians unable to properly identify and address copyright issues in the workplace. This paper offers a critical analysis of LIS programs over the past 10–12 years with a specific focus on trends in the teaching of copyright matters. Employing a qualitative methodology with a mixed-method approach, the authors analyzed the syllabi of courses dedicated to copyright and intellectual property offered at select LIS programs. The goal was to understand what the copyright courses cover, how they are taught, instructional sources and resources, and curriculum changes over time, where applicable. Findings show that the few LIS programs offering copyright courses have rigorous and dynamic copyright curriculum that constantly changes with the evolving copyright environment. The main takeaway and recommendation is that some kind of coordination is needed in the teaching of copyright and that LIS programs may need minimum standards for the core curriculum of copyright courses. The coordinating mechanism will ensure that periodic review of the core curriculum occurs and takes into account the rapid changes in the different library environments where library students work.
  • Conference Session I: Mitigating Risk at the Front Lines: The Copyright First Responders Program. Presented by Kyle Courtney, Copyright Advisor, the Office for Scholarly Communication, Harvard University.

    Benson, Sara R. (Clemson University Press, 2018-02-26)
    This is a summary of Kyle Courtney's Invited Presentation at the 2017 Kraemer Copyright Conference titled "Mitigating Risk at the Front Lines:  The Copyright First Responders Program."  After reading this article you will better understand the method and purpose of the First Responders Program and, hopefully, like me, you will be ready to volunteer your institution to add to the growing list of libraries engaged in this hub-and-spoke model of copyright information system.
  • Copyright Literacy and the Role of Librarians as Educators and Advocates

    Secker, Jane; Morrison, Chris; Nilsson, Inga-Lill (Clemson University Press, 2019-06-22)
    The paper is inspired by the opening panel of the International Federation of Library Associations’ (IFLA) World Library and Information Congress off-site meeting held in Poland in August 2017 on models for copyright education. The panel was made up of researchers from the United Kingdom, Sweden, Turkey, Romania, and Norway and reflected on findings from a multinational study on levels of copyright literacy of librarians and those in the cultural heritage sector (Todorova et al., 2017). The members of the panel considered the rationale for copyright education, why it might be viewed as part of wider information literacy initiatives, and the specific challenges and opportunities that it presents. The paper recognizes the value in national library associations and international organizations such as IFLA and Electronic Information for Libraries (EIFL) taking a lead in promoting copyright education initiatives to strengthen their advocacy role. The paper also argues for a more critical and universal approach to copyright education so that this work is extended beyond the library sector.
  • Principles of the JCEL Publication Agreement: Stakeholders, Copyright, and Policy Positions

    Crews, Kenneth D. (Clemson University Press, 2016-09-12)
    Every academic, scholarly, or professional journal should have a publication agreement for contributing authors to sign – but only if the agreement is good.  A well-considered agreement is a chance to create an improved relationship among authors, publishers, and readers.  By contrast, a bad agreement can do real damage.  The Editorial Board of the Journal of Copyright for Education and Librarianship (“JCEL”) deliberated thoroughly the details of the agreement it offers to contributing authors, with the quest of putting into practice our principles about the relationship of copyright and scholarly works, in service to our community of stakeholders.This article is intended to capture and document the Board’s reflections on the JCEL agreement with two leading objectives: To explain to contributing authors the meaning and significance of various provisions in the agreement, and to serve as a motivation and resource for editors of other journals as they engage in a fresh examination of their agreements.  This article offers a bit of explanatory background and a hint of some of the internal give and take that led to the final version.  Although our publication agreement should be regularly reexamined, with future changes to meet changing needs, the principles underlying the current draft should remain steady.

Más