• A Critical Analysis of Brian Victoria's Perspectives on Modern Japanese Buddhist History.

      Metraux, Daniel A.; Mary Baldwin College (University of Lucerne, 2015-02-20)
    • A Different Buddhist Revival: The Promotion of Vinaya (jielü 戒律) in Republican China

      Campo, Daniela (University of Lucerne, 2017-10-27)
      The aim of this exploratory study is to provide an outline of the Vinaya renewal in China in the first half of the twentieth century, and to point to its meanings and effects in the context of the Buddhist revival of the Republican period. Based on a preliminary investigation of monastic codes compiled by four influential Buddhist leaders in the 1930s and 1940s, my paper draws attention to their endeavor to promote Chinese monastic discipline in practice and in discourse. I argue that, during the Republican period, Chinese Vinaya represented the benchmark for both molding religious regeneration and setting the limit for Buddhist institutional innovation. The promotion of Vinaya was a long-standing, indigenous, pattern for the revitalization of the Buddhist tradition, and it also played a fundamental role in the modern evolution of Chinese Buddhism by helping the monastic community strengthen its religious authority and political legitimation. I hope to show that a deeper analysis of this phenomenon may in the future help balance current visions on Chinese modernism, dominated by Western categories, theories and dichotomies related to modernity and secularism.
    • A Modern Buddhist Bible: Essential Readings from East and West, edited by Donald S. Lopez Jr.

      Baumann, Martin; University of Lucerne (University of Lucerne, 2015-02-20)
    • A Neglected Diary, A Forgotten Buddhist Couple: Tana Daishō's Internment Camp Diary as a Historical and Literary Text

      Ama, Michihiro; University of Alaska Anchorage (University of Lucerne, 2015-02-20)
    • A Strand of Contemporary Tantra: Its Discourse and Practice in the FPMT

      Eddy, Glenys; University of Sydney (University of Lucerne, 2015-02-20)
      This paper utilizes the data obtained from fieldwork conducted at Vajrayana Institute, a Buddhist centre affiliated with the worldwide Gelugpa Tibetan Foundation for the Preservation of the Mahayana Tradition (FPMT), to explore the approach to and practice of Tantra in a contemporary Western Buddhist context. In particular, this paper highlights the seriousness with which Tantra is treated in this religious setting, challenging Urban’s statement, largely based on his examination of the Western appropriation of Hindu Tantra, that the West has appropriated Tantra as a form of spiritual hedonism. The paper describes the orientation toward Tantric activity within the FPMT by outlining its relationship to the following aspects of religious activity: to sutra study and practice, ethical training and the Mahayana motivation, the role of taking refuge, and to the purpose of initiation and keeping Tantric commitments.
    • Adapting the Dharma: Buddhism and Contemporary Theatre Training

      Middleton, Deborah; Plá, Daniel (University of Lucerne, 2018-12-28)
       In this paper, we explore two examples of Western theatre practice which draw directly on Buddhist monastic dance. Examining Chogyam Trungpa Rinpoche’s Mudra Space Awareness alongside Mexican theatre director Nicolás Núñez’s Citlalmina allows us to consider the ways in which aspects of Buddhism might be conveyed within performative form, and to consider these practices as translations from Vajrayana Buddhism. This discussion opens into a consideration of the ways in which Buddhism and theatre might be seen to be mutually enriching, and to share certain common potentials as vehicles for cultivation.
    • Almost a Proper Buddhist: the Post-secular Complexity of Heritage Buddhist Teen Identity in Britain

      Thanissaro, Phra Nicholas; University of Warwick, Coventry (University of Lucerne, 2015-02-19)
      This qualitative study explores how Buddhist affiliation relates to practice, how Buddhist teens define and experience their religious identity and which sociological paradigms are helpful in understanding the dynamics of Buddhist teen identity. Focus group methodology was used to examine attitudes to superstition, stereotypes, prejudice, religion and society, convictions, and friends for 65 heritage Buddhist teenagers from Britain. Shared identity was expressed in terms of spiritual teachers, eclecticism within the Buddhist tradition, Asian heritage, openness to the supernatural, relevance of Buddhism in the present day and temple-going. Practice rather than belief seemed to represent the operational difference between how Buddhist teens defined 'Buddhist' and 'proper Buddhist'. Buddhist teens experienced little negative prejudice on account of their religion but experienced being grouped with Buddhists of other ethnicities in others' eyes. Secularization, modernity, projection and especially post-secularism were found helpful as sociological paradigms for explaining various aspects of Buddhist teen identity.
    • American Buddhism as a Way of Life, edited by Gary Storhoff and John Whalen-Bridge.

      Seager, Richard Hughes; Hamilton College (University of Lucerne, 2015-02-20)
    • American Dharma, by Ann Gleig

      Quli, Natalie Fisk (University of Lucerne, 2019-12-09)
    • American JewBu, by Emily Sigalow

      Sasson, Vanessa (University of Lucerne, 2020-10-09)
    • An American Buddhist Life: Memoirs of a Modern Dharma Pioneer, by Charles S. Prebish.

      Fisher, Danny; University of the West (University of Lucerne, 2015-02-20)
    • An Entangled Relationship: A Lived Religion Approach to Theravāda Buddhism and Economics

      Schedneck, Brooke (University of Lucerne, 2019-08-20)
      From the perspectives of lived practices of Buddhists, Theravāda Buddhism and economics have a deeply intertwined relationship. My proposed theoretical method for the study of Buddhism and economics delineates two approaches: the doctrinal approach of Max Weber and a modified lived religion approach. The doctrinal approach, which focuses on Buddhist texts and the early monastic life, treats anything outside of a posited “pure Buddhism,” as a transformation of the “original” teachings into something new and different. The remnants of this idea of transformation can be seen in studies of Theravāda Buddhism, causing economic practices involving Buddhist monks to be analyzed as a deviation from the Buddha’s teachings. I propose moving beyond early Buddhism and text-based studies as a baseline for comparison by offering as an alternative a modified version of the lived religion method of Meredith McGuire. My theoretical modifications to this approach allow us to think about lived religion in the Theravāda Buddhist context. I recommend that the cultural logic of Theravāda Buddhism, in particular the economy of merit and contingent conjunctures of engagements with the market, need to be considered in order to avoid understanding Buddhist connections with the economy as a transformation of Buddhist doctrine.
    • An Entangled Relationship: Buddhism and Tourist Economies in Contemporary Thailand

      Schedneck, Brooke (University of Lucerne, 2019-08-20)
      From the perspectives of lived practices of Buddhists, Theravāda Buddhism and economics have a deeply intertwined relationship. My proposed theoretical method for the study of Buddhism and economics delineates two approaches: the doctrinal approach of Max Weber and a modified lived religion approach. The doctrinal approach, which focuses on Buddhist texts and the early monastic life, treats anything outside of a posited “pure Buddhism,” as a transformation of the “original” teachings into something new and different. The remnants of this idea of transformation can be seen in studies of Theravāda Buddhism, causing economic practices involving Buddhist monks to be analyzed as a deviation from the Buddha’s teachings. I propose moving beyond early Buddhism and text-based studies as a baseline for comparison by offering as an alternative a modified version of the lived religion method of Meredith McGuire. My theoretical modifications to this approach allow us to think about lived religion in the Theravāda Buddhist context. I recommend that the cultural logic of Theravāda Buddhism, in particular the economy of merit and contingent conjunctures of engagements with the market, need to be considered in order to avoid understanding Buddhist connections with the economy as a transformation of Buddhist doctrine.
    • At Ease in Between: The Middle Position of a Scholar-Practitioner

      Williams, Duncan Ryûken; UC Berkeley (University of Lucerne, 2015-02-20)
      This essay explores the recent state of the field of Buddhist Studies in the United States and how scholar-practitioners of Buddhism might position themselves within these institutional contexts. I propose that Buddhists scholar-practitioners have two major responsibilities vis-à-vis our students: 1) encourage students to “sympathetically understand” the tradition and 2) develop some critical perspective on a tradition with its lengthy history, multiplicity of sectarian forms, and great diversity of ways in which the religion has had and continues to have impact on culture, art, politics, and so forth.
    • Avataṃsaka 華嚴 Transnationalism in Modern Sinitic Buddhism

      Hammerstrom, Erik; Pacific Lutheran University (University of Lucerne, 2016-12-07)
      This article describes the important but overlooked influence of Avataṃsaka thought within East Asian Buddhism from the nineteenth century to the 1930s. It shows that Avataṃsaka was transnational in two significant ways: First, its popularity is illustrative of the connections that existed between Buddhists in China, Japan, and Korea during that time. Second, Avataṃsaka thought served as the basis for discourses of transnationalism.
    • Being Creative With Tradition: Rooting Theravàda Buddhism in Britain

      Bell, Sandra; University of Durham (University of Lucerne, 2015-02-19)
    • Border country dharma: Buddhism, Ireland and peripherality

      Cox, Laurence; National University of Ireland, Maynooth; Griffin, Maria; National University of Ireland, Maynooth (University of Lucerne, 2015-02-20)
    • Branding a New Buddhist Movement: The New Kadampa Tradition’s Self- Identification as “Modern Buddhism”

      Emory-Moore, Christopher; North Island College (University of Lucerne, 2020-10-04)
      This article examines the New Kadampa Tradition’s North American missionary deployment of the epithet “Modern Buddhism” in publicity, text, and teaching. I argue that while “Modern Buddhism” branding supports the NKT’s international growth by promoting its founder’s teachings as universally accessible and not Tibetan, those teachings are more continuous with traditional Geluk doctrine than with David McMahan’s (2008) portrayal of Buddhist modernism. Specifically, I find minimal evidence of detraditionalization, demythologization, and psychologization in the NKT founder’s 2011 book Modern Buddhism and in public meditation instruction derived therefrom at a Canadian NKT center. My findings locate the NKT’s deployment of the “Modern Buddhism” brand within a graduated missionizing strategy that combines promotional modernism and pedagogical traditionalism to attract North American non-Buddhists by offering culturally desired, this-worldly benefits (e.g., stress reduction) followed by less familiar, other-worldly Buddhist goals (e.g., happiness in future lives).