Journal of Markets & Morality is a peer-reviewed academic journal published by the Acton Institute for the Study of Religion & Liberty. The journal promotes intellectual exploration of the relationship between economics and morality from both social science and theological perspectives.

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The Globethics.net library contains articles of the Journal of Markets & Morality as of vol. 1(1998) no. 2 to current.

Recent Submissions

  • Review of "The European Guilds: An Economic Analysis" by Sheilagh Ogilvie

    Beiting, Christopher (Acton Institute for the Study of Religion & Liberty, 2021-01-21)
    The European Guilds: An Economic AnalysisSheilagh OgilviePrinceton and Oxford: Princeton University Press, 2019 (645 pages)
  • Abraham Kuyper and the Social Order: Principles for Christian Liberalism

    Tuininga, Matthew J. (Acton Institute for the Study of Religion & Liberty, 2021-01-21)
    Abraham Kuyper was a staunch critic of the secularist liberalism that he identified as the legacy of the French Revolution, but in its place, he advocated a political theology that is best described as a form of Christian liberalism. Believing the world was in danger of fracturing under the diffusive and secularizing pressure of modernity, he attempted to articulate a vigorous, socially aware, gospel-centered Christian vision of political engagement. At the center of this attempt were his writings on charity and justice.Matthew J. Tuininga, "Abraham Kuyper and the Social Order: Principles for Christian Liberalism," Journal of Markets & Morality 23, no. 2 (2020): 337-361
  • Like Bright Stars: Abraham Kuyper on the Nature and Vocation of the Scholarly Sphere

    Pahman, Dylan (Acton Institute for the Study of Religion & Liberty, 2021-01-21)
    This article argues that Kuyper’s philosophy of education, principally as outlined in his Encyclopedia of Sacred Theology, inter alia, undergirds his social theory and thus should inform our understanding of his social thought. In the first section, I briefly summarize Kuyper’s answer to a series of questions regarding the nature of science. In the second, I build upon Kuyper’s philosophy of education to examine his understanding of the nature and telos of Calvinist educational communities, universities in particular. I conclude by examining new avenues for future research.Dylan Pahman, "Like Bright Stars: Abraham Kuyper on the Nature and Vocation of the Scholarly Sphere," Journal of Markets & Morality 23, no. 2 (2020): 391-411
  • Review of "Of Labour and Liberty: Distributism in Victoria 1891–1966" by Race Mathews

    Casey, M. A. (Acton Institute for the Study of Religion & Liberty, 2021-01-21)
    Of Labour and Liberty: Distributism in Victoria 1891–1966Race MathewsNotre Dame: University of Notre Dame Press, 2018 (410 pages)
  • Review of "The Political Morality of the Late Scholastics: Civil Life, War and Conscience" by Daniel Schwartz

    Astorri, Paolo (Acton Institute for the Study of Religion & Liberty, 2021-01-21)
    The Political Morality of the Late Scholastics: Civil Life, War and ConscienceDaniel SchwartzCambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2019 (234 pages)
  • Review of "Old Testament Ethics: A Guided Tour" by John Goldingay

    Collins, C. John (Acton Institute for the Study of Religion & Liberty, 2021-01-21)
    Old Testament Ethics: A Guided TourJohn GoldingayDowners Grove: IVP Academic, 2019 (viii + 278)
  • An Ethical Policy for an Islamic People: The Colonial Policy of the Kuyper Cabinet (1901–1905) and the Challenge of Human Development

    Heslam, Peter S. (Acton Institute for the Study of Religion & Liberty, 2021-01-21)
    The Dutch public philosopher and social entrepreneur Abraham Kuyper ushered in a new era in Dutch colonial affairs when he became Prime Minister in 1901. Economic exploitation would be replaced by an “ethical policy” based on the moral responsibility of the Netherlands for the well-being of the indigenous people of its colonies. This article uses four types of “capital” needed for human development to frame the key components of the ethical policy vis-à-vis Indonesia, which are elucidated within their historical context. Despite the brevity of Kuyper’s cabinet (1901–1905), conditions on the ground improved, in part through its support for indigenous entrepreneurship and political decentralization.Peter S. Heslam, "An Ethical Policy for an Islamic People: The Colonial Policy of the Kuyper Cabinet (1901–1905) and the Challenge of Human Development," Journal of Markets & Morality 23, no. 2 (2020): 297-317
  • Editorial: Abraham Kuyper, Troublemaker

    Joustra, Jessica; Joustra, Robert (Acton Institute for the Study of Religion & Liberty, 2021-01-21)
    Abraham Kuyper (1837–1920), newspaper and university founder, pastor, church maker and breaker, and Dutch prime minister, was, truth be told, a troublemaker. Don’t get us wrong: He was a true “renaissance man” as at least one, a little overly rosy biography has put it, a man of deep piety and a passionate follower of Jesus Christ, but he also had that quality of driven, singularly gifted men, of alienating those closest to him.Jessica Joustra and Robert Joustra, "Editorial: Abraham Kuyper, Troublemaker," Journal of Markets & Morality 23, no. 2 (2020): 253-261
  • Contributors Index (vol. 23)

    Staff, JMM (Acton Institute for the Study of Religion & Liberty, 2021-01-21)
    Alphabetical listing, by author, of contributions to the Journal of Markets & Morality 22, no. 1 and 2 (2020).
  • Review of "Religion and Finance: Comparing the Approaches of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam" by Mervyn K. Lewis and Ahmad Kaleem

    Salter, Alexander William (Acton Institute for the Study of Religion & Liberty, 2021-01-21)
    Religion and Finance: Comparing the Approaches of Judaism, Christianity, and IslamMervyn K. Lewis and Ahmad KaleemCheltenham, Edward Elgar (2019) (xviii + 248)
  • Contributors

    Staff, JMM (Acton Institute for the Study of Religion & Liberty, 2021-01-21)
    Authors and bios for JMM 23.2
  • The Boundaries of Our Habitation: Why We Need Nations

    Mouw, Richard J. (Acton Institute for the Study of Religion & Liberty, 2021-01-21)
    This article argues that to Abraham Kuyper human diversity, including nationhood, is God-ordained and fundamentally good. In that light, this paper explores Kuyper’s perspective on: how nations differ from states; how they are to be understood both eschatologically and ecclesiologically; the benefits and bond of national diversity; and in conclusion, the difference between sinful loyalty and an appropriate patriotism of compassion, recommending the latter for our politics today.Richard J. Mouw, "The Boundaries of Our Habitation: Why We Need Nations," Journal of Markets & Morality 23, no. 2 (2020): 285-295 
  • Abraham Kuyper and the Economic Teachings of the Heidelberg Catechism

    Ballor, Jordan J. (Acton Institute for the Study of Religion & Liberty, 2021-01-21)
    This article explores the economic teachings of the Heidelberg Catechism, a key confessional document in the Reformed tradition, through the lens of historic Reformed commentary, particularly that of the Dutch theologian and statesman Abraham Kuyper (1837–1920). The Catechism’s teachings concerning the origin, essence, and nature of economic activity are captured in the themes of superabundance, stewardship, and sabbath. These themes are reflected in the Catechism’s explication of the fourth petition of the Lord’s Prayer, “Give us this day our daily bread” (Lord’s Day 50); the eighth commandment, “Do not steal” (Lord’s Day 42); and the fourth commandment, “Remember the Sabbath Day” (Lord’s Day 38).Jordan J. Ballor, "Abraham Kuyper and the Economic Teachings of the Heidelberg Catechism," Journal of Markets & Morality 23, no. 2 (2020): 363-390
  • A Doctrine for Diversity: Utilizing Herman Bavinck’s Theology for Racial Reconciliation in the Church

    Boyce, William E. (Acton Institute for the Study of Religion & Liberty, 2021-01-21)
    In many evangelical circles, racial reconciliation is becoming a celebrated mandate, but the argument for racial and ethnic diversity in churches often rests on sparse proof-texting. This article explores the theme of diversity in Bavinck’s corpus, specifically focusing on the place of diversity in Bavinck’s doctrines of first things, last things, and the church. By rooting racial diversity under the auspices of dogmatic theology, the church gains much-needed rationale for the pursuit of such diversity in practice. Racial diversity is part of God’s created order, protected by God’s providence, redeemed through Christ’s atonement, purified in the eschaton, and preserved through the church’s catholicity. The pursuit of racial diversity within the church is a doctrinally mandated task, not merely part of the cultural zeitgeist. Bavinck’s Reformed legacy smiles upon such a pursuit.William E. Boyce, "A Doctrine for Diversity: Utilizing Herman Bavinck’s Theology for Racial Reconciliation in the Church," Journal of Markets & Morality 23, no. 2 (2020): 319-336
  • I Look through My Window into Life: Kuyper’s Notion of Sphere Sovereignty (1870–1880)

    Harinck, George (Acton Institute for the Study of Religion & Liberty, 2021-01-21)
    The notion of sphere sovereignty as presented by Abraham Kuyper was not so much the cumulative result of his knowledge of the intellectual history of Calvinism, but to a large extent his own idea. Kuyper started using the term sphere sovereignty early in his career, at first in relation to the freedom of the church from the state, later on in a new, ontological sense. Kuyper referred to the Bible and to Calvin as the origin of his notion, but, basically, he found it by looking into life. The suggestion that he derived this notion from Althusius lacks any historical proof.George Harinck, "I Look through My Window into Life: Kuyper’s Notion of Sphere Sovereignty (1870–1880)," Journal of Markets & Morality 23, no. 2 (2020): 265-284
  • Review of "Do Markets Corrupt Our Morals?" by Virgil Henry Storr and Ginny Seung Choi

    Juurikkala, Oskari (Acton Institute for the Study of Religion & Liberty, 2021-01-21)
    Do Markets Corrupt Our Morals?Virgil Henry Storr and Ginny Seung ChoiPalgrave Macmillan, 2019 (281 pages)
  • Contributors Index (vol. 22)

    Staff, JMM (Acton Institute for the Study of Religion & Liberty, 2020-10-20)
    Alphabetical listing, by author, of contributions to the Journal of Markets & Morality 22, no. 1 and 2 (Spring and Fall 2019).
  • Merit: Contrived or Morally Measured?

    Barnett, Timothy J. (Acton Institute for the Study of Religion & Liberty, 2020-09-22)
    What is merit, how is it measured, and why does our understanding of it matter? Merit is broadly understood and generally defined as constituting the quality of being particularly good or worthy, especially so as to deserve praise or suitable reward. For example, a fine automobile merits the attention of car connoisseurs because of its outstanding design, craftsmanship, safety, performance, and the good taste of interior appointments. In economics, merit is viewed as the justification for remuneration, compensation, and economic rewards.Timothy J. Barnett, "Merit: Contrived or Morally Measured?" Journal of Markets & Morality 23, no. 1 (2020): 157-172.
  • Ethical Maturity and Economic Progress: Adam Smith’s Lesson Still Applies

    Carden, Art; Caskey, Greg; Marshall, Jennings (Acton Institute for the Study of Religion & Liberty, 2020-09-22)
    As Vernon Smith argued, “markets economize on the need for virtue, but do not eliminate it.” The need for a virtuous, ethically mature citizenry is an important but often-overlooked theme in Adam Smith. Unethical business behavior creates a demand for government regulation ostensibly to fix the problem; however, evidence that government regulation reduces economic growth suggests that this does not so much solve the old problem as it creates new ones. Using what we know about “rational irrationality” and people’s views on government, we explain why unethical business behavior leads to a higher demand for government intervention and why that intervention is not likely to create a more ethically mature society.Art Carden, Greg Caskey, and Jennings Marshall, "Ethical Maturity and Economic Progress: Adam Smith’s Lesson Still Applies," Journal of Markets & Morality 23, no. 1 (2020): 45-59.
  • The Good Economic Judgment of Father Jaime Balmes

    Chafuen, Alejandro (Acton Institute for the Study of Religion & Liberty, 2020-09-22)
    Some years ago I wrote an article summarizing Jaime Balmes’s criticisms of socialism, which he wrote many years before Karl Marx. His analysis appeared in a series of seven essays that clearly described the dangerous and harmful nature of these doctrines. Given that the socialists are back in power in Spain and that many in Catalonia, Balmes’s land, have forgotten his lessons, increased focus on his writings is a healthy endeavor.Alejandro Chafuen, "The Good Economic Judgment of Father Jaime Balmes," Journal of Markets & Morality 23, no. 1 (2020): 201-204.

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