Journal of Markets & Morality is a peer-reviewed academic journal published by the Acton Institute for the Study of Religion & Liberty. The journal promotes intellectual exploration of the relationship between economics and morality from both social science and theological perspectives.

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The Globethics.net library contains articles of the Journal of Markets & Morality as of vol. 1(1998) no. 2 to current.

Recent Submissions

  • Review of "Aquinas and the Market: Toward a Humane Economy" by Mary L. Hirschfeld

    Crespo, Ricardo F. (Acton Institute for the Study of Religion & Liberty, 2019-12-20)
    Aquinas and the Market: Toward a Humane EconomyMary L. HirschfeldCambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University Press, 2018 (288 pages)
  • Editorial: Humility and Interdisciplinary Collaboration

    Schmiesing, Kevin (Acton Institute for the Study of Religion & Liberty, 2019-12-20)
    Any journal predicated on a dialogue between Christian theology and social science must confront, directly or indirectly, the relationship between faith and reason.
  • Catherine of Siena’s Humanism: A Tale of Two Cities

    Droste, Catherine Joseph (Acton Institute for the Study of Religion & Liberty, 2019-12-20)
    In considering the Dominican contribution to “freedom, virtue, and the good society,” Catherine of Siena may not be the first figure who comes to mind. But Catherine was a saint, a doctor of the Church, a mystic, a reformer, and was sent into public ministry by the Lord himself. A group of followers, both men and women, soon gathered around her, and after she arbitrated peace between warring noble Sienese families, her reputation spread beyond her hometown. By the age of twenty-five she was acting as an ambassador between Tuscan cities and the papacy, and she actively urged Pope Gregory XI, both during a visit to Avignon and in personal letters, to call a crusade; to return the papacy to Rome; and to begin a general reform of the Church.
  • Rethinking Consociatio in Althusius’s Politica

    Kennedy, Simon P. (Acton Institute for the Study of Religion & Liberty, 2019-12-20)
    One of the key terms in the enormous Politica Methodice Digesta, Atque Exemplis Sacris et Profanis Illustrata of Johannes Althusius (1557–1638) is consociatio. This word has been translated into English a number of different ways by Althusius interpreters. This article contends that these renderings have proven confusing and unhelpful and that a better approach to this key concept is needed. It offers a brief appraisal of the received translations of consociatio in Althusius scholarship before providing a fresh interpretation which, it is hoped, will go some way to alleviating the extant confusion about Althusius’s political ideas.
  • The Future of Christian Higher Education: A Political Economy Analysis

    Daniels, Denise; Henry, Caleb; Murg, Bradley Jensen (Acton Institute for the Study of Religion & Liberty, 2019-12-20)
    The challenges confronting today’s faith-based schools, while similar to those that their now-secular predecessors faced, have evolved in a new direction. Historically, Christian scholars worried about the dangers of religious schools becoming secular and indistinguishable from state universities. While some Christian colleges and universities today continue a gradual drift towards secularization, others, structured by deeply ingrained norms of “mission,” are increasingly tempted to redefine their faith with respect to cultural referents instead of long-standing Christian orthodoxy. When such an approach is taken to its logical extreme these religious schools may become less tolerant of religiously faithful students than is constitutionally possible for state institutions. We use a neo-institutional model of change to explain why and how this occurs, and offer ways that Christian colleges and universities might retain their identity and thrive in the changing higher education landscape.
  • The Modernistic Roots of Our Ecological Crisis: The Lynn White Thesis at Fifty

    Spencer, Andrew J. (Acton Institute for the Study of Religion & Liberty, 2019-12-20)
    This article reviews the history of Lynn White’s influential essay “The Historical Roots of Our Ecological Crisis” and its evaluation of Christianity as a cause of modern ecological degradation in particular. Both White’s essay and various responses to it are critiqued for proposing the substitution of a traditional Christian perspective on God, humanity, and the natural world. Instead, this article insists that environmental ethics needs a robust and traditional Christian theology to undergird it.
  • Introduction to Johann Gerhard’s Life and Thought

    Kilcrease, Jack D. (Acton Institute for the Study of Religion & Liberty, 2019-12-20)
    In this brief introductory essay, we present a biographical sketch of Gerhard’s life and then move on to examine his place in the early modern intellectual tradition known as “Protestant scholasticism.”
  • Review of "Leo Strauss and His Catholic Readers" edited by Geoffrey M. Vaughan

    Simonetti Neto, Silvio Livio (Acton Institute for the Study of Religion & Liberty, 2019-12-20)
    Leo Strauss and His Catholic ReadersGeoffrey M. Vaughan (Editor)Washington, DC: The Catholic University of America Press, 2018 (360 pages)
  • Other Books of Interest

    Staff, JMM (Acton Institute for the Study of Religion & Liberty, 2019-12-20)
    Commentary on Thomas Aquinas’s Virtue EthicsJ. BudziszewskiCambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2017 (322 pages)Great Economic Thinkers: An Introduction—From Adam Smith to Amartya SenJonathan Conlin (Editor)London: Reaktion Books, 2018 (311 pages)Thomas Hobbes and the Natural LawKody W. CooperNotre Dame, Indiana: University of Notre Dame Press, 2018 (341 pages)Work: Its Purpose, Dignity, and TransformationDaniel M. DorianiPhillipsburg, New Jersey: P&R Publishing, 2019 (243 pages)The Virtue of NationalismYoram HazonyNew York: Basic Books, 2018 (285 pages)Incentives to Pander: How Politicians Use Corporate Welfare for Political GainNathan M. Jensen and Edmund J. MaleskyCambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2018 (268 pages)The Skillfulness of Virtue: Improving Our Moral and Epistemic LivesMatt StichterCambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2018 (209 pages)
  • Contributors

    Staff, JMM (Acton Institute for the Study of Religion & Liberty, 2019-12-20)
    Authors and bios for JMM 22.2
  • Review of "Uneasy Street: The Anxieties of Affluence" by Rachel Sherman

    Hübner, Jamin Andreas (Acton Institute for the Study of Religion & Liberty, 2019-12-20)
    Uneasy Street: The Anxieties of AffluenceRachel ShermanPrinceton: Princeton University Press, 2017 (328 pages)
  • Review of "Driven by Hope: Economics and Theology in Dialogue" edited by Steven C. van den Heuvel and Patrick Nullens

    Steen, Todd P. (Acton Institute for the Study of Religion & Liberty, 2019-12-20)
    Driven by Hope: Economics and Theology in DialogueSteven C. van den Heuvel and Patrick Nullens (Editors)Leuven, Belgium: Peeters, 2018 (272 pages)
  • The Obligations and Limitations of Solidarity: The Role of the State in Migration Ethics

    Spieker, Manfred (Acton Institute for the Study of Religion & Liberty, 2019-12-20)
    In the face of the European refugee crisis since fall 2015, the Vatican, the United Nations (UN), the European Union (EU), and the German government have all rightly appealed to the principle of solidarity. However, this article argues that they have all failed to account for the obligations that solidarity places upon refugees and migrants, as well as failing to account for the differences between refugees and migrants and the political limitations of host countries. Discussions of the refugee crisis need to avoid moralizing political problems if the principle of solidarity is to be properly and fully observed.
  • St. Thomas Aquinas and the Idea of Limited Government

    Rhonheimer, Martin (Acton Institute for the Study of Religion & Liberty, 2019-12-20)
    To understand Thomas Aquinas’s contribution to the idea of limited government we must first ask what exactly limited government is and which are its historical and philosophical presuppositions. It seems clear that Thomas Aquinas did not hold such a doctrine. He was not a constitutionalist in the modern sense. It is, however, crucial to understand that liberal constitutionalism, insofar as it emphasizes individual freedom, basic civil rights, and limited government, was not opposed to the medieval understanding of government. It did, however, contradict modern absolutism. In the Middle Ages, government not bound to any law was known as tyranny and clearly rejected as both immoral and politically pernicious. But it was the abuse of power for the sake of personal interest and, thus, a perverted form of government.
  • Review of "God, Hierarchy, and Power: Orthodox Theologies of Authority from Byzantium" by Ashley M. Purpura

    Pahman, Dylan (Acton Institute for the Study of Religion & Liberty, 2019-12-20)
    God, Hierarchy, and Power: Orthodox Theologies of Authority from ByzantiumAshley M. PurpuraNew York: Fordham University Press, 2018 (226 pages)
  • Review of "Natural Law and Religious Freedom: The Role of Moral First Things in Grounding and Protecting the First Freedom" by J. Daryl Charles

    Watson, Micah (Acton Institute for the Study of Religion & Liberty, 2019-12-20)
    Natural Law and Religious Freedom: The Role of Moral First Things in Grounding and Protecting the First FreedomJ. Daryl CharlesNew York: Routledge, 2018 (290 pages)
  • Henri-Dominique Lacordaire, OP: A Dominican Faces Modernity

    Gregg, Samuel (Acton Institute for the Study of Religion & Liberty, 2019-12-20)
    My task is to consider the thought of one important Dominican who wrote in the modern era, in the wake of the various Enlightenments and the aftermath of the French Revolution. The life and writings of Father Henri-Dominique Lacordaire reflect all the dramas of Catholicism’s ongoing, difficult, but inescapable engagement with societies shaped by the movements of ideas that emerged in the eighteenth century and transformed the world—for better and for worse. Some of these ideas resulted in positive developments such as the abolition of hereditary privileges. Other ideas associated with the same movements, however, brought many people to the guillotine.
  • The Economic Thought of Friar Tomás de Mercado: A Dominican Synthesis

    Richards, Jay W. (Acton Institute for the Study of Religion & Liberty, 2019-12-20)
    Tomás de Mercado should be better known than he is. For Dominican scholars in particular, his book Deals of Contracts of Merchants and Traders—which I will refer to as the Manual—is an example of the Dominican charism at its best. This article will introduce Mercado, situate him historically, and then describe how his work exhibits what economists might call the “comparative advantage” of his Dominican calling.
  • Radical Orthodoxy’s Flawed Critique of Markets and Morality

    Lunn, John (Acton Institute for the Study of Religion & Liberty, 2019-12-20)
    Radical Orthodoxy (RO) consists of a group of theologians who are very critical of market economies and representative democracy. They claim that philosophical and theological innovations in the late Middle Ages ultimately led to the Enlightenment and to capitalism. They argue that a return to medieval and patristic roots of Christian thought is needed to have a Christian social order. They utilize a genealogical approach that traces out how changes made by Duns Scotus and William of Ockham to the theology associated with Aquinas caused a movement to secularism and to an unjust economic system. I offer a critique of their arguments by arguing that they ignore history in their account and fail to consider how an extensive division of labor in modern economies requires an approach different from the one they offer.
  • Review of "F. A. Hayek: Economics, Political Economy and Social Philosophy" by Peter J. Boettke

    Chua Soo Meng, Jude (Acton Institute for the Study of Religion & Liberty, 2019-12-20)
    F. A. Hayek: Economics, Political Economy and Social PhilosophyPeter J. BoettkeLondon: Palgrave Macmillan (350 pages)

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