• Review of "Corporate Social Responsibility in the Twenty-First Century" by Bryan Horrigan

      Capaldi, Nicholas (Acton Institute for the Study of Religion & Liberty, 2011-12-05)
      Corporate Social Responsibility in the Twenty-First Century Bryan Horrigan Northampton, Massachusetts: Edward Elgar, 2010 (427 pages)
    • Review of "Values-Based Multinational Management: Achieving Sustainability Through a Human Rights Strategy" by Lee A. Tavis and Timothy M. Tavis

      Von Dohlen, Richard F. (Acton Institute for the Study of Religion & Liberty, 2011-12-05)
      Values-Based Multinational Management: Achieving Sustainability Through a Human Rights Strategy Lee A. Tavis and Timothy M. Tavis Notre Dame, Indiana: University of Notre Dame Press, 2009 (347 pages)
    • Translator's Introduction

      Rester, Todd M. (Acton Institute for the Study of Religion & Liberty, 2011-12-05)
      Despite the fact that Junius insists in his letter to the nobles of Holland that he will stay within the bounds of a theologian who knows his place, one wonders if there was a judicial complement who had studied theology, languages, and classics as closely and with as much distinction as Junius had studied law. This work as well as Junius scholarly caliber forms also a counterpoint and rebuke to overcome the frequent stereotype that humanism and scholasticism are necessarily antithetical. In Junius, we have one theologian who was trained as a humanist upon legal and classical sources, formally cultivated the study of biblical languages and hermeneutics, contributed to the development of theological systems, thoroughly engaged in pastoral praxis and confessional development, and managed to maintain a modest sobriety about his role as a theologian. Yet, how many opportunities did Junius have to address matters of state and civil polity whether as diplomat, pastor, or theologian? Furthermore, Junius and his work stand as a beacon and call for the interconnectivity, engagement, and distinctness of philosophy, culture, society, civil polity, and theology.
    • Review of "The Gospel and Globalization: Exploring the Religious Roots of a Globalized World" edited by Michael W. Goheen and Erin G. Glanville

      McCann, Dennis P. (Acton Institute for the Study of Religion & Liberty, 2011-12-05)
      The Gospel and Globalization: Exploring the Religious Roots of a Globalized World Michael W. Goheen and Erin G. Glanville (Editors) Vancouver, British Columbia: Regent College Publishing/Geneva Society, 2009 (382 pages)
    • Review of "The Big Short: Inside the Doomsday Machine" by Michael Lewis

      Torres, Maximilian B. (Acton Institute for the Study of Religion & Liberty, 2011-12-05)
      The Big Short: Inside the Doomsday Machine Michael Lewis New York: W. W. Norton, 2010 (266 pages)
    • Review of "Adam Smith and the Economy of the Passions" by Jan Horst Keppler

      Young, Jeffrey T. (Acton Institute for the Study of Religion & Liberty, 2011-12-05)
      Adam Smith and the Economy of the Passions Jan Horst Keppler London and New York: Routledge, 2010 (163 pages)
    • Review of "Entrepreneurship in the Catholic Tradition" by Anthony C. Percy

      Orsini, Jean-Francois (Acton Institute for the Study of Religion & Liberty, 2011-12-05)
      Entrepreneurship in the Catholic Tradition Anthony C. Percy Lanham, Maryland: Lexington Books, 2010 (191 pages)
    • Review of "Entrepreneurship and Religion" edited by Leo-Paul Dana

      Schansberg, D. Eric (Acton Institute for the Study of Religion & Liberty, 2011-12-05)
      Entrepreneurship and Religion Leo-Paul Dana (Editor) Cheltenham, United Kingdom: Edward Elgar, 2010 (442 pages)
    • Review of "The Battle: How the Fight Between Free Enterprise and Big Government Will Shape Americas Future" by Arthur C. Brooks

      Pisciotta, John (Acton Institute for the Study of Religion & Liberty, 2011-12-05)
      The Battle: How the Fight Between Free Enterprise and Big Government Will Shape Americas Future Arthur C. Brooks New York: Basic Books, 2010 (192 pages)
    • Calling in the Theology of Work

      Theology of Work Project, TWP (Acton Institute for the Study of Religion & Liberty, 2011-12-05)
      God does lead people to particular jobs, professions, and types of work. However, in the Bible, the concept of calling goes deeper than anyone aspect of life, such as work. God calls people to become united with himself inevery aspect of life. This can only occur as a response to Christs call to follow him. The calling to follow Christ lies at the root of every other calling. It is important, however, not to confuse a calling to follow Christ with a calling to become a professional church worker. People in every walk of life are called to follow Christ with equal depth and commitment.
    • Contributors

      Staff, JMM (Acton Institute for the Study of Religion & Liberty, 2011-12-05)
      List of contributors for Volume 14, Number 1.
    • Review of "Toward a Truly Free Market: A Distributist Perspective on the Role of Government, Taxes, Health Care, Deficits, and More" by John C. Mdaille

      Lottieri, Carlo (Acton Institute for the Study of Religion & Liberty, 2011-12-05)
      Toward a Truly Free Market: A Distributist Perspective on the Role of Government, Taxes, Health Care, Deficits, and More John C. Mdaille Wilmington, Delaware: ISI Books, 2010 (282 pages)
    • Review of "Faith in Politics: Religion and Liberal Democracy" by Bryan T. McGraw

      Knippenberg, Joseph M. (Acton Institute for the Study of Religion & Liberty, 2011-12-05)
      Faith in Politics: Religion and Liberal Democracy Bryan T. McGraw Cambridge, United Kingdom: Cambridge University Press, 2010 (320 pages)
    • Review of "New Financial Horizons: The Emergence of an Economy of Communion" by Lorna Gold

      Acton Institute for the Study of Religion & Liberty, 2011-12-05
      New Financial Horizons: The Emergence of an Economy of Communion Lorna Gold Foreword by Michael Naughton Hyde Park, New York: New City Press, 2010 (224 pages)
    • Nine Libertarian Heresies Tempting Neoconservative Catholics to Stray from Catholic Social Thought

      Finn, Daniel K. (Acton Institute for the Study of Religion & Liberty, 2012-01-19)
      For the last four decades, a number of neoconservative Christian scholars have worked to great benefit in articulating the moral foundations of capitalism and its positive moral effects in socializing market participants. This has been much-needed work, as the Christian churches still have not grappled adequately with the systematic moral defense of self-interest in market relationships that has been employed in secular thought for three hundred years. At the same time, however, many involved in this affirmation of capitalism have too easily found common cause with others on the political right, in particular libertarians, whose fundamental view of the human person and morality is at odds with a Christian and, in particular, a Catholic view of life.
    • Continuity and Res Novae in the Encyclical Letter Caritas in Veritate

      Spieker, Manfred (Acton Institute for the Study of Religion & Liberty, 2012-01-19)
      Although Pope Benedict XVIs encyclical Caritas in Veritate (CV) has largely been viewed as treating globalization, this article shows that CV is much more than a globalization encyclical. First, it focuses on the continuities in the social doctrine of the Roman Catholic Church with regard to the anthropological and theological preconditions of globalization. Second, with regard to the economic, social, and political aspects of these preconditions, this article highlights the new things that find special emphasis in CV. While there are significant continuities with globalization as treated in CV and preceding social teaching, CV is the encyclical that demonstrates that the decisive battle for a human society is not made in the field of economics but in the field of bioethics. It is the encyclical that integrates bioethics into the social doctrine of the Roman Catholic Church.Manfred Spieker, "Continuity and Res Novae in the Encyclical Letter Caritas in Veritate," Journal of Markets & Morality 14, no. 2 (Fall 2011): 327-343
    • Taming the Beast: The Long and Hard Road to the Christian Social Conference of 1952

      van der Woude, Rolf (Acton Institute for the Study of Religion & Liberty, 2012-01-19)
      During the second half of the nineteenth century, the Netherlands was confronted with the social and political integration of the working and middle classes. The contribution of Protestantism to the solution has been heavily debated. An ongoing question has been how the over-weaned, conservative, Christian social thought that always rejected a large government role in society had, after World War II, so quickly moved to support expanding the welfare state. New investigation shows that the answer is found by supplementing the existing portrait at two points. First, alongside the Kuyperian movement there already existed a social tradition far less identifiable that was rooted in the Dutch Reformed Church. Although much less visible in the social debate, it nonetheless exerted significant influence on the settlement of the social question. Second, before World War II, a decisive reversal had occurred in the acceptance of a welfare state by younger people from both traditions so that the tipping point came before 1940.Rolf van der Woude, "Taming the Beast: The Long and Hard Road to the Christian Social Conference of 1952," Journal of Markets & Morality 14, no. 2 (Fall 2011): 419-444
    • Finns Nine Libertarian Heresies and Muellers First Lemma

      Mueller, John D. (Acton Institute for the Study of Religion & Liberty, 2012-01-19)
      Mark Twain remarked in his autobiography that Wagners music is better than it sounds. Similarly, Daniel K. Finns Nine Libertarian Heresies Tempting Neoconservative Catholics to Stray from Catholic Social Thought is better than it reads, which is like a draft introduction to The Catholic Economists Guide to How to Make Enemies and Fail to Influence People.
    • Nine Libertarian Heresies A Surresponse

      Santelli II, Anthony E. (Acton Institute for the Study of Religion & Liberty, 2012-01-19)
      Finn says that my arguments fail to erect a position that is both Catholic and libertarian. I disagree and will expound on them here further, showing how justice for all is possible within such an order. In addition, I will show that Finns belief in the redistribution of income is contrary to Catholic social thought. It is he who fails to erect a position that is both Catholic and liberal.
    • Syb Talma: A Dutch Christian Socialist

      van Krieken, Gerard (Acton Institute for the Study of Religion & Liberty, 2012-01-19)
      Inspired by the London harbor strike of 1889, Syb Talma went from being a young, Dutch Reformed pastor of the ethical theological school to actively advocating for workers rights in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century in the Netherlands, particularly from within the labor organization Patrimonium. Talma remained loyal to the Dutch Reformed Church even after the split of 1886, when Abraham Kuyper led the formation of the Reformed Churches of the Netherlands, a more conservative denomination. Yet, inspired by Kuypers speech at the First Christian Social Congress, Talma also joined the formers Antirevolutionary Party and remained loyal to it until his death, even holding public office in the early twentieth century. This article examines Talmas life and work, specifically focusing on his views of politics, labor unions, and workers rights.Gerard van Krieken, "Syb Talma: A Dutch Christian Socialist," Journal of Markets & Morality 14, no. 2 (Fall 2011): 393-418