Journal of Markets & Morality is a peer-reviewed academic journal published by the Acton Institute for the Study of Religion & Liberty. The journal promotes intellectual exploration of the relationship between economics and morality from both social science and theological perspectives.

News

The Globethics.net library contains articles of the Journal of Markets & Morality as of vol. 1(1998) no. 2 to current.

Recent Submissions

  • Review Essay: Bavinckian Ressourcement and Aggiornamento

    Echeverria, Eduardo (Acton Institute for the Study of Religion & Liberty, 2021-07-21)
    Cory Brock, Orthodox yet Modern: Herman Bavinck’s Use of Friedrich Schleiermacher (Bellingham, WA: Lexham Press, 2020)James Eglinton, Bavinck: A Critical Biography (Grand Rapids: Baker Academic, 2020).
  • Review of "Reimaging Capitalism in a World on Fire" by Rebecca Henderson

    Hemphill, Thomas A. (Acton Institute for the Study of Religion & Liberty, 2021-07-21)
    Reimaging Capitalism in a World on FireRebecca HendersonNew York: Hachette Book Group, 2020 (322 pages)
  • Radical Orthodoxy’s Flawed Critique of Markets and Morality

    Lunn, John (Acton Institute for the Study of Religion & Liberty, 2021-07-21)
    Radical Orthodoxy (RO) consists of a group of theologians who are very critical of market economies and representative democracy. They claim that philosophical and theological innovations in the late Middle Ages ultimately led to the Enlightenment and to capitalism. They argue that a return to medieval and patristic roots of Christian thought is needed to have a Christian social order. They utilize a genealogical approach that traces out how changes made by Duns Scotus and William of Ockham to the theology associated with Aquinas caused a movement to secularism and to an unjust economic system. I offer a critique of their arguments by arguing that they ignore history in their account and fail to consider how an extensive division of labor in modern economies requires an approach different from the one they offer.
  • The Marxist Influence on Christian Teaching about Work

    Masarik, Albin (Acton Institute for the Study of Religion & Liberty, 2021-07-21)
    This article reflects on the influence of the Marxist environment from the previous social system on the attitudes of Christians toward work, especially on those who consciously and responsibly coped with the ideological influences but did not reflect on a number of the distortive effects of the environment that they did not perceive as ideological, such as accepting good pay in low-value jobs.
  • Telos and Markets: Aristotle, Burke, and Hayek on the Role of Economics in the Wider Social Order

    Collins, Gregory M. (Acton Institute for the Study of Religion & Liberty, 2021-07-21)
    Aristotle’s objection to unlimited commercial exchange as an unnatural activity governed by no moral constraints or teleological aims continues to endure as a powerful criticism of markets. This article applies this criticism to the thought of Edmund Burke and F. A. Hayek. It argues that whereas Hayek’s suspicion of teleology and a hierarchy of ends does leave his embrace of market economies vulnerable to Aristotle’s criticism, Burke overcomes this objection by explicitly subordinating commerce to the religious and moral imperatives of a nation.
  • Review of "Governing Least: A New England Libertarianism" by Dan Moller

    Medenhall, Allen (Acton Institute for the Study of Religion & Liberty, 2021-07-21)
    Governing Least: A New England LibertarianismDan MollerOxford University Press, 2019 (336 pages)
  • Editorial: Memento Mori, Markets, and Morality

    Pahman, Dylan (Acton Institute for the Study of Religion & Liberty, 2021-07-21)
    After “a world of change” in this journal’s editorial staff over the last few years, I write now as its executive editor, succeeding friends and mentors in the honor of publishing the foremost scholarship on the morality of the marketplace, of faith and of freedom.
  • Radical Orthodoxy Encounters Economics: Deeper Engagement Needed—A Response to John Lunn

    Oslington, Paul (Acton Institute for the Study of Religion & Liberty, 2021-07-21)
    John Lunn’s recent article in this journal is one of the few attempts by economists to engage with one of the most influential movements in contemporary theology, the Radical Orthodoxy movement of John Milbank, Graham Ward, Catherine Pickstock, Adrian Pabst, and others. However, Lunn fails to properly contextualize the movement, bases his engagement on a small and idiosyncratic sample of their writings on economics, and mischaracterizes their views on some issues. This does not mean that Radical Orthodoxy’s treatment of economics is beyond criticism. Parts of its account of economics are inaccurate, and there are questions about the consistency of its theological and economic arguments. Despite these flaws there is much that economists can learn from grappling with the questions posed by Radical Orthodoxy, because it raises important questions from outside the modern secular framework inhabited by most modern economists.
  • Deeper Engagement Still Needed: A Surresponse to John Lunn

    Oslington, Paul (Acton Institute for the Study of Religion & Liberty, 2021-07-21)
    thank John Lunn for his response to my criticisms. It clarifies his position on a few of the issues. I would like to use this opportunity that the editor has provided to briefly expand on three issues: historiography, the Christian socialist background to Radical Orthodoxy, and ecclesiology.
  • Evangelicalism and the Postcommunist Reconstruction of Culture

    Hanes, Pavel (Acton Institute for the Study of Religion & Liberty, 2021-07-21)
    Evangelical religion was a recognized force in some periods of history, effective in social and political reform in Britain and America. In postcommunist Europe, reconstruction is hampered by a multitude of problems common to all its communities and political systems, in particular by residual effects of Marxist atheistic principles, which, under totalitarianism, were applied to the whole way of life and culture. This article offers suggestions of how the past successes of evangelical revivals in the West might provide inspiration for the theological and practical work of contemporary evangelicalism, if it is to help in postcommunist reconstruction.
  • The Church Financing Scheme: Its Influence on Religious Freedom in Czechoslovakia to 1989

    Procházka, Pavel (Acton Institute for the Study of Religion & Liberty, 2021-07-21)
    The financing of church life in the Slovak Republic is still a topical theme. Cofinancing church activities from the national budget has not always garnered a positive response among the laity. The current scheme of financing Slovak churches developed out of the cooperative model of a relationship with the state. Its roots are found in the reformation period of Emperor Joseph II (1780–1790). The traditional church financing scheme was cleverly used by the communist regime that came to power in Czechoslovakia after the end of the Second World War. The author demonstrates, using specific documentation from archived materials, the limitations to religious freedom that resulted from the scheme of the state taking on the financing of church life.
  • Business Ethics in the Marketplace: Exploring Transgenderism

    Tarwater, John; Lenow, Evan (Acton Institute for the Study of Religion & Liberty, 2021-07-21)
    Proponents of transgenderism offer a competing story of reality, epistemology, and anthropology vis-á-vis Scripture’s teaching that God made humanity in his image either male or female. If the transgender argument continues to take root in culture as it has begun to do so in the courts and legislatures, it will have devastating effects in both the church and the marketplace where Christians will be subjected to public criticism and further legal battles. This essay argues from a conservative Evangelical perspective, augmented by a biblically informed natural law moral point of view, that it is permissible for Christian employers to terminate employees on the basis of transgender identity, and that this perspective should be protected, rather than persecuted, by the state.
  • Review of "The Price of Bread: Regulating the Market in the Dutch Republic" by Jan de Vries

    Decock, Wim (Acton Institute for the Study of Religion & Liberty, 2021-07-21)
    The Price of Bread: Regulating the Market in the Dutch RepublicJan de VriesCambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2019 (515 pages)
  • Socioeconomic Exclusion and Roma Education in Slovakia

    Šoltésová, Viktória (Acton Institute for the Study of Religion & Liberty, 2021-07-21)
    A key problem in the Roma minority’s social status in Slovakia and Central and Eastern Europe is education. Failure on all levels of the education system contributes to the socioeconomic exclusion of the Roma, leads to increased crime, and prevents members of the minority from having equal access to opportunities in the areas of employment and the fulfilment of life goals. Through analysis of successful projects and approaches, we want to outline ways Christian churches may support such projects in the interests of a society that is evolving positively and prospering.
  • Misguided Triage Ethics: Chances of Survival and Risks of Dying in the Coronavirus Pandemic

    Spieker, Manfred (Acton Institute for the Study of Religion & Liberty, 2021-07-21)
    The corona pandemic has forced us to examine rules for allocating survival chances and mortality risks when ICU beds and ventilators are not sufficient for all patients who need them. In the debate about triage ethics one must distinguish between ex ante triage and ex post triage. Ex ante triage addresses which of the patients arriving simultaneously in an emergency room should receive an intensive care bed and which should not. Urgency and prognosis are the decisive medical criteria. Ex post triage determines whether a respirator may be removed from a patient who has already been connected to it and given it to a newly admitted patient. The most frequently made mistake in ex ante triage is discrimination based on the patient’s age. Frequent aberrations in ex post triage are decisions based on the quantification of expected life spans, as well as an equivalence of ex ante and ex post triage, which is justified by the false equivalence of action and omission or the thesis of the inevitability of human culpability.
  • Contributors

    Staff, JMM (Acton Institute for the Study of Religion & Liberty, 2021-07-21)
    Authors and bios for JMM 24.1
  • Review of "The Keynesian Revolution and Our Empty Economy: We’re All Dead" by Victor V. Claar and Greg Forster

    van Vliet, Jan (Acton Institute for the Study of Religion & Liberty, 2021-07-21)
    The Keynesian Revolution and Our Empty Economy: We’re All DeadVictor V. Claar and Greg ForsterSpringer/ Palgrave Macmillan, 2019 (345 pages)
  • Critique of Radical Orthodoxy: A Response to Paul Oslington

    Lunn, John (Acton Institute for the Study of Religion & Liberty, 2021-07-21)
    Paul Oslington offers a sharp attack on the criticisms I made of Radical Orthodoxy in the Fall 2019 issue of this Journal. He accuses me of engaging with only a small sample of Radical Orthodoxy’s writings. I confess that I have not read everything written by the Radical Orthodoxy writers, and that I did not cite every book or article I have read. But I did deal with major works, especially written by John Milbank, and I tried to give a sense of the theological underpinnings to the social theory.
  • Review of "Measuring Poverty around the World" by Anthony Atkinson

    Ibarra-Caton, Marilyn (Acton Institute for the Study of Religion & Liberty, 2021-07-21)
    Measuring Poverty around the WorldAnthony AtkinsonPrinceton: Princeton University Press, 2019 (429 pages)
  • Laudato Si’: A Hayekian Perspective

    Subrick, Robert (Acton Institute for the Study of Religion & Liberty, 2021-07-21)
    Pope Francis’s encyclical Laudato Si’ contains a number of arguments that have striking similarities with the writings of F. A. Hayek. In particular Pope Francis’s concerns about humanity’s ability to adapt to rapid social and technological change compliment Hayek’s well-known arguments in The Road to Serfdom. Of course, Hayek would reject Pope Francis’s concerns about excessive consumerism, and he would question the Pontiff’s overly optimistic view of public sector officials. But overall, there are some notable similarities between the current Bishop of Rome and the Austrian economist that have gone unnoticed.

View more