Journal of Markets & Morality is a peer-reviewed academic journal published by the Acton Institute for the Study of Religion & Liberty. The journal promotes intellectual exploration of the relationship between economics and morality from both social science and theological perspectives.

News

The Globethics.net library contains articles of the Journal of Markets & Morality as of vol. 1(1998) no. 2 to current.

Recent Submissions

  • Review of "Faith, Class, and Labor: Intersectional Approaches in a Global Context" edited by Jin Young Choi and Joerg Rieger

    Estey, Ken (Acton Institute for the Study of Religion & Liberty, 2022-02-21)
    Faith, Class, and Labor: Intersectional Approaches in a Global ContextJin Young Choi and Joerg Rieger, eds.Eugene, Oregon: Pickwick Publications, 2020 (xx + 270 pages)
  • Review of "The Ethics of Capitalism: An Introduction" by Daniel Halliday and John Thrasher

    Heslam, Peter S. (Acton Institute for the Study of Religion & Liberty, 2022-02-21)
    The Ethics of Capitalism: An IntroductionDaniel Halliday and John ThrasherOxford: Oxford University Press, 2020 (xvi + 288 pages)
  • Review of "The Tyranny of Big Tech" by Josh Hawley

    Hemphill, Thomas A. (Acton Institute for the Study of Religion & Liberty, 2022-02-21)
    The Tyranny of Big TechJosh HawleyWashington, DC: Regnery, 2021 (194 pages)
  • God, Commerce, and Adam Smith through the Editions of The Theory of Moral Sentiments

    Matson, Erik W. (Acton Institute for the Study of Religion & Liberty, 2022-02-21)
    This article provides an overview of the major changes across the editions of Adam Smith’s Theory of Moral Sentiments (TMS). It deals with two issues relating to Smith’s theological and economic perspectives. Although Smith pares away some of the orthodox Christian theology in the later editions of TMS, even evincing a skeptical attitude in some moments about revealed theology and divine providence, his theory of conscience and the impartial spectator increasingly takes on a theological dimension. Second, the final edition of TMS implicitly presents honest commerce as a way of cooperating with the Deity in serving human happiness. The evolution of TMS points to a complexity in Smith’s theological perspectives and highlights interrelations of those perspectives with aspects of his economic philosophy.Erik W. Matson, "God, Commerce, and Adam Smith through the Editions of The Theory of Moral Sentiments," Journal of Markets & Morality 24, no. 2 (2021): 269-288.
  • Review of "A Christian Approach to Corporate Religious Liberty" by Edward A. David

    Potts, Garret (Acton Institute for the Study of Religion & Liberty, 2022-02-21)
    A Christian Approach to Corporate Religious LibertyEdward A. DavidCham, Switzerland: Palgrave MacMillan, 2020 (264 pages)
  • Review of "A China Business Primer: Ethics, Culture, and Relationships" by Michael Santoro and Robert Shanklin

    Wang, William Hongsong (Acton Institute for the Study of Religion & Liberty, 2022-02-21)
    A China Business Primer: Ethics, Culture, and RelationshipsMichael Santoro and Robert ShanklinLondon: Routledge, 2021 (144 pages)
  • From Kuyper to Keynes: The Anti-Revolutionary Party Astray on the Dirigiste Path

    Zeegers, Abraham (Acton Institute for the Study of Religion & Liberty, 2022-02-21)
    Translated with an introduction by Albert Gootjes.Original citation:Abraham Zeegers, Van Kuyper tot Keynes, De A.R.-partij op de dirigistische doolweg (Amsterdam: Johannes Althusius Vereniging, 1958).This translation:Abraham Zeegers, "From Kuyper to Keynes: The Anti-Revolutionary Party Astray on the Dirigiste Path," Journal of Markets & Morality 24, no. 2 (2021): 343-394.
  • Review of "Christianity and the New Spirit of Capitalism" by Kathryn Tanner

    Rieger, Joerg (Acton Institute for the Study of Religion & Liberty, 2022-02-21)
    Christianity and the New Spirit of CapitalismKathryn TannerNew Haven: Yale University Press, 2019 (241 pages)
  • Editorial: The Law We Lost

    Pahman, Dylan (Acton Institute for the Study of Religion & Liberty, 2022-02-21)
    “All human societies face about the same problems,” claim David Friedman, Peter Leeson, and David Skarbek in their fascinating and peculiar book Legal Systems Very Different from Ours. “They deal with them in an interesting variety of different ways. All of them are grownups—there is little reason to believe that the people who created the legal systems of Imperial China, Periclean Athens, or saga-period Iceland were any less intelligent than the creators of the US legal system. All of the systems should be taken seriously, each as one way in which a human society dealt with its legal problems.” So also, we could add, their economic problems. In particular, those interested in Christian social and economic thought today might have more to learn than they would expect from Christian Rome and Byzantium.Dylan Pahman, "Editorial: The Law We Lost," Journal of Markets & Morality 24, no. 2 (2021): 241-243.
  • Review of "Preventing Unjust War: A Catholic Argument for Conscientious Objection" by Roger Bergman

    Patterson, Eric; Parr, Grace Lee (Acton Institute for the Study of Religion & Liberty, 2022-02-21)
    Preventing Unjust War: A Catholic Argument for Conscientious ObjectionRoger BergmanEugene, OR: Wipf & Stock, 2020 (xiv + 199 pages)
  • Review of "The Business of Conquest: Empire, Love, and Law in the Atlantic World" by Nicole D. Legnani

    Astorri, Paolo (Acton Institute for the Study of Religion & Liberty, 2022-02-21)
    The Business of Conquest: Empire, Love, and Law in the Atlantic WorldNicole D. LegnaniNotre Dame: University of Notre Dame Press, 2020 (282 pages)
  • The Moral Critique of Consumerism in Solzhenitsyn’s Economic and Political Thought

    Zeller, Camryn; McMullen, Steven (Acton Institute for the Study of Religion & Liberty, 2022-02-21)
    Though best known for his literature and critique of Soviet communism, in the 1970s and 1980s Russian novelist and historian Alexandr Solzhenitsyn shook the West with his controversial criticisms of the weaknesses he saw in Western culture, especially concerning the lack of morality and an obsession with material goods. His critique closely follows contemporary critiques of consumerism, particularly among Christian scholars. This article summarizes Solzhenitsyn’s critique of the West, and compares his ideas with modern scholarship about consumerism. Solzhenitsyn’s work demonstrates the importance of a proper understanding of the purpose of human beings for economic and social thought. Moreover, his work provides an important account of the necessary morality of economic life that prizes individual choice, takes economic culture seriously, and rejects technocratic visions of economics.Camryn Zeller and Steven McMullen, "The Moral Critique of Consumerism in Solzhenitsyn's Economic and Political Thought," Journal of Markets & Morality 24, no. 2 (2021): 309-324.
  • Review of "Liberty for All: Defending Everyone’s Religious Freedom in a Pluralistic Age" by Andrew T. Walker

    Watson, Micah (Acton Institute for the Study of Religion & Liberty, 2022-02-21)
    Liberty for All: Defending Everyone’s Religious Freedom in a Pluralistic AgeAndrew T. WalkerGrand Rapids: Brazos Press, 2021 (258 pages)
  • Contributors

    Staff, JMM (Acton Institute for the Study of Religion & Liberty, 2022-02-21)
    Authors and bios for JMM 24.2
  • Review Essay: Religion and the Rise of Capitalism

    Oslington, Paul (Acton Institute for the Study of Religion & Liberty, 2022-02-21)
    The title of Benjamin Friedman’s new book Religion and the Rise of Capitalism alludes to Max Weber and R. H. Tawney who argued there was a strong causal connection between religious ideas and economic behavior. In contrast to Weber and Tawney, this is a book about the influence of religious ideas on economic ideas and the development of economics as a discipline, especially as they are relevant to American capitalism.Paul Oslington, "Review Essay: Religion and the Rise of Capitalism," Journal of Markets & Morality 24, no. 2 (2021): 325-339.
  • Contributors Index (vol. 24)

    Staff, JMM (Acton Institute for the Study of Religion & Liberty, 2022-02-21)
    Alphabetical listing, by author, of contributions to the Journal of Markets & Morality 24, no. 1 and 2 (2021).
  • Virtue Non Est Disputandum?

    Dabbs, Russell (Acton Institute for the Study of Religion & Liberty, 2022-02-21)
    Is virtue a matter of taste, and thus outside the range of economic reasoning? Inspired by Stigler and Becker’s “De Gustibus Non Est Disputandum” (“there is no disputing tastes”), this article develops a simple rational choice model in the manner of Becker in which virtue serves as a form of human capital, thereby allowing virtue to situate itself within the model as a tool rather than taste, and as a means of applying the economic way of thinking to aspects of life typically regarded as either off limits to it or too fragile to withstand its probing.Russell Dabbs, "Virtue Non Est Disputandum?" Jorunal of Markets & Morality 24, no. 2 (2021): 289-307.
  • Review of "Spielräume eines Pfarrers vor der Reformation. Ulrich Krafft in Ulm" by Berndt Hamm

    Patriarca, Giovanni (Acton Institute for the Study of Religion & Liberty, 2022-02-21)
    Spielräume eines Pfarrers vor der Reformation. Ulrich Krafft in UlmBerndt HammVeröffentlichungen der Stadtbibliothek (Vol. 27): Ulm, 2020 (451 pages)
  • Aquinas and Libertarianism: Coercion and the Common Good in the Summa’s Definition of Law

    McIntosh, Jonathan (Acton Institute for the Study of Religion & Liberty, 2022-02-21)
    While many scholars have addressed the relationship between Aquinas’s political philosophy and the concerns of classical liberalism more broadly, less attention has been given to his thought in light of libertarianism’s focus on the problem of coercion and the principle of harm more specifically. By reading Aquinas’s systematic definition of law from the Summa Theologiae’s “Treatise on Law” (ST I-II, q. 90, a. 1) in light of the libertarian harm principle, my aim is not only to pinpoint precisely those areas of disagreement between the Thomistic and libertarian approaches to law, but also those areas of either real or at least possible agreement. Where they disagree, I show that this is the result of either assumptions on Aquinas’s part that lack necessity or arguments that are fallacious in their reasoning.Jonathan McIntosh, "Aquinas and Libertarianism: Coercion and the Common Good in the Summa's Definition of Law," Journal of Markets & Morality 24, no. 2 (2021): 247-268.
  • Review of "Empire, Economics, and the New Testament" by Peter Oakes

    Downs, David J. (Acton Institute for the Study of Religion & Liberty, 2022-02-21)
    Empire, Economics, and the New TestamentPeter OakesGrand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2020 (237 pages)

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