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dc.contributor.authorBrockhouse, Charles
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-25T09:05:06Z
dc.date.available2019-09-25T09:05:06Z
dc.date.created2011-07-28 00:35
dc.date.issued2011
dc.identifier.issn1941-8450
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12424/180398
dc.description.abstract"No time or civilization is independent. Like all others, Western medieval civilization was extensively informed by outside influences particularly the preceding Greco-Roman culture, and the neighboring Arabic-Muslim civilization. So there is naturally a strong tendency among popular considerations of medieval life to attribute the intellectual innovations of the age as merely the importation of established knowledge from other cultures, either preceding or neighboring. Yet, anyone who has spent time wandering in the great northern cathedrals such as Salisbury (construction starting in 1220) or Chartres (1024 ff) must surely grasp how intellectually vibrant the culture was. The spectacle of massive roofs made of stone, wood, and lead apparently floating on curtains of stained glass gives one a visceral grasp of the energy and innovative nature of that civilization. The progress made in engineering, and the rapid spread of innovations across Europe from one cathedral to another demonstrates a strong grasp of empirical methods and mathematics, particularly geometry. [4] While the basics of mathematics were in great degree inherited or re-acquired from contact with Arabian civilization, several of the intellectual giants of the age such as Roger Bacon (c. 1219-1294) and William of Occam (c. 1288-c.1348), made important contributions to the development of both the intellectual approaches and their practical application in the form of geometry. (The response by Cherney, this collection, goes into more detailed consideration of the contributions of the individuals in question.)"(pg 96)
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherRabbi Myer and Dorothy Kripke Center for the Study of Religion and Society
dc.rightsWith permission of the license/copyright holder
dc.subjectmoral education
dc.subjectscientific ethics
dc.subject.otherChristian denominations
dc.subject.otherRoman Catholic
dc.titleThe Catholic Intellectual Tradition
dc.typeArticle
dc.source.journaltitleJournal of Religion and Society
dc.source.volume6
dc.source.beginpage95
dc.source.endpage101
dcterms.accessRightsopen access
refterms.dateFOA2019-09-25T09:05:06Z
ge.collectioncodeAA
ge.dataimportlabelGlobethics object
ge.identifier.legacyglobethics:4428964
ge.identifier.permalinkhttps://www.globethics.net/gtl/4428964
ge.journalyear2011
ge.lastmodificationdate2018-10-30 16:44
ge.lastmodificationuseradmin@novalogix.ch
ge.submissions1
ge.peerreviewedno
ge.placeofpublicationCreighton University
ge.setnameGlobeTheoLib
ge.setspecglobetheolib
ge.submitter.emaillijoamuabel@rediffmail.com
ge.submitter.nameJohn, Lijo
ge.submitter.userid2069840
ge.subtitleA Biologist’s Perspective on Science and the Catholic Intellectual Tradition
ge.linkhttp://moses.creighton.edu/JRS/


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