The McGill Journal of Education (MJE) is a peer-reviewed, interdisciplinary, open access, bilingual scholarly journal published three times a year. Embracing a broad conception of education, the MJE is dedicated to connecting educational research, theory, policy and practice by inviting thoughtful and critical submissions from scholars and practitioners working in diverse areas of education and learning in Quebec, Canada and internationally. These include formal, non-formal, informal, or incidental forms of teaching and learning; from preschool to adult education; in a range of social settings within and outside of school, and community/popular education contexts. The journal welcomes critical discussion and debate on issues in education through its regular and guest themed issues. Recent themes have included such topics as: Canadian education, Quebec education, Indigenous education, evolution education, mentoring, learning in social action, schools and the courts, student engagement, young people and media, and narrative. A primary goal of the MJE is to open spaces for the exchange of ideas across disciplinary boundaries and among diverse audiences (academic, practitioner, broader public). For this purpose, the journal will feature avenues for peer-reviewed and non-peer-reviewed (editorial) publications and discussion forums; the journal also publishes book reviews. Another of its major goals is to provide a window on developments in education and learning in the Quebec context as well as throughout Francophonie by encouraging English- and French-language submissions. MJE is also committed to supporting the work of emerging scholars.

News

The Globethics library contains articles of McGill Journal of Education (MJE) as of vol. 1(1966) to current.

Recent Submissions

  • iTutorGroup: A case study of covert native-speakerism underneath a social justice façade

    Alvarez, Hector Sebastian (McGill Journal of Education / Revue des sciences de l'éducation de McGillRevue des sciences de l'éducation de McGill, 2022-03-31)
    This article examines the covert native-speakerist strategies iTutorGroup utilizes to discriminate against teachers of nationalities the company appears to deem as undesired. Through content analysis of numerous job application submissions to iTutorGroup’s website, results show iTutorGroup’s automatic hiring process offers teachers of these nationalities a much lower potential wage and only a video-recorded asynchronous interview, if not complete refusal to an interview. In contrast, British, Australasian, and North American nationals are afforded a much higher potential wage as well as a one-on-one live interview. The company conceals these nuanced discriminatory strategies with a façade of equality since they are one of TESOL International Association’s Global Partners. As a Global Partner, iTutorGroup follows suit in pretending to uphold TESOL’s nondiscrimination policies.
  • Class-wide behaviour management practices reported by pre-and elementary school teachers: Relations with individual and contextual characteristics

    Nadeau, Marie-France; Massé, Line; Verret, Claudia; Gaudreau, Nancy; Lagacé-Leblanc, Jeanne (McGill Journal of Education / Revue des sciences de l'éducation de McGillRevue des sciences de l'éducation de McGill, 2022-03-31)
    This study examined the use of inclusive practices by 1,373 Quebec teachers to promote prosocial behaviour, according to their individual and contextual characteristics. Two questionnaires were used: a sociodemographic and a validated Classroom Behaviour Management Practices Inventory (N = 68 items; 2 dimensions/7 scales α = .70 to .90). Results from descriptive and univariate variance analysis showed that proactive /positive dimension practices (e.g., rules, instructional, reinforcement-based) are used more frequently than reductive dimension practices (e.g., educational consequences), although some of the latter are frequently used. Hierarchical models indicate significant interrelationships with teachers characteristics and the scales of classroom behaviour management practices, but for a small proportion of explained variance.
  • Volume 57 Issue 2: Editorial

    McGill Journal of Education / Revue des sciences de l'éducation de McGillRevue des sciences de l'éducation de McGill, 2022-03-31
  • Itutor group: A case study of covert native-speakerism underneath a social justice facade

    Alvarez, Hector Sebastian (McGill Journal of Education / Revue des sciences de l'éducation de McGillRevue des sciences de l'éducation de McGill, 2022-03-31)
    This article examines the covert native-speakerist strategies iTutorGroup utilizes to discriminate against teachers of nationalities the company appears to deem as undesired. Through content analysis of numerous job application submissions to iTutorGroup’s website, results show iTutorGroup’s automatic hiring process offers teachers of these nationalities a much lower potential wage and only a video-recorded asynchronous interview, if not complete refusal to an interview. In contrast, British, Australasian, and North American nationals are afforded a much higher potential wage as well as a one-on-one live interview. The company conceals these nuanced discriminatory strategies with a façade of equality since they are one of TESOL International Association’s Global Partners. As a Global Partner, iTutorGroup follows suit in pretending to uphold TESOL’s nondiscrimination policies.
  • Demoralization as a form of teacher burnout

    Sokal, Laura; Eblie Trudel, Lesley (McGill Journal of Education / Revue des sciences de l'éducation de McGillRevue des sciences de l'éducation de McGill, 2022-03-31)
    Over fifty years of research investigating teacher burnout has resulted in a well-accepted model of burnout that involves three dimensions: exhaustion, depersonalization, and loss of accomplishment. Recently, a new cause of teacher attrition has been proposed called “demoralization,” on the argument that demoralization is a distinct phenomenon from burnout. In light of new research methodologies that allow for examination of unique pathways or “profiles” of teacher burnout, we explore the question, providing an analysis that suggests instead that depersonalization can be fairly represented as one profile of burnout. 
  • Authoring professional identity: Pre-service teachers and ways of knowing

    Hill, S. Laurie (McGill Journal of Education / Revue des sciences de l'éducation de McGillRevue des sciences de l'éducation de McGill, 2022-03-31)
    Education programs increasingly emphasize the development of strong core beliefs and values to support professional judgment for pre-service teacher practice. The ability to critically integrate multiple perspectives is an expected foundation for the pedagogical decisions and professional responsibilities preservice teachers carry out. This article details research undertaken to investigate pre-service teachers’ ways of knowing as they progress through a Bachelor of Education program. Findings from semi-structured interviews are discussed in terms of supporting pre-service teacher intellectual development in teacher education programs so that a professional teacher identity is encouraged.
  • Validation of the French version of the student engagement instrument

    Lessard, Anne; Lopez, Amanda; Diallo, Thierno (McGill Journal of Education / Revue des sciences de l'éducation de McGillRevue des sciences de l'éducation de McGill, 2022-03-31)
    The purpose of this study is to explore the psychometric properties of the French version of the Student Engagement Instrument in order to perform a cross-cultural validation of its factorial structure, based on a sample of 919 French Canadian high school students. Results confirm the reliability of the instrument with good internal consistency (Cronbach’s alpha between .76 and .84). Confirmatory factor analysis shows the validity of the six scales composing the French version of the instrument. Results are significant as there were no standardized instruments with which to evaluate student engagement in high school students in French. Student engagement represents an important intervention target towards improving student achievement and preventing dropout.
  • Teacher telling in the mathematics classroom: A microlevel study of the dynamics between general and contextualized knowledge

    Chesnais, Aurelie; Horoks, Julie; Robert, Aline; Rogalski, Janine (McGill Journal of Education / Revue des sciences de l'éducation de McGillRevue des sciences de l'éducation de McGill, 2022-03-31)
    In this article, we analyze moments of teacher telling (MTT) involving the exposition of new knowledge to students. We first specify the theoretical framework used for our analyses and describe our global methodology, focusing on teacher telling moments as taking part in the students’ mathematics learning. Then, we review the literature on this topic and develop a specific tool, called a “proximity,” to study MMTs in relation to whole-class scaffolding. Finally, we compare two high school teachers’ practices in teaching the same content — variation of functions for 10th grade students — to illustrate this new analytical lens. In the conclusion, we discuss our approach and develop several research perspectives.
  • “Breaking the mould”: Resisting the stereotypes of being a Black Canadian student-athlete

    Nartey, Humphrey; James, Carl E. (McGill Journal of Education / Revue des sciences de l'éducation de McGillRevue des sciences de l'éducation de McGill, 2022-03-31)
    This article examines how stereotypes operate in the social construction of Black Canadian male student-athletes and how those stereotypes frame these students’ lived experiences in relation to race, athletic ability, and academic performance. From qualitative interviews with twenty current and former Black Canadian student-athletes, we found that they largely resisted and challenged the stereotypes of being primarily athletes and less students. In various ways, they sought to demonstrate that they possessed the skills needed to be academically successful students with the ability to balance their athletic and academic responsibilities and commitments. This was evident in their having obtained the required grades to enter university, receiving athletic scholarships, maintaining playing eligibility, graduating from university, and going on to pursue graduate studies.
  • Supporting self-regulated learning in a secondary applied mathematics course

    Buzza, Dawn; Fitzgerald, Carolyn; Avitzur, Yoad (McGill Journal of Education / Revue des sciences de l'éducation de McGillRevue des sciences de l'éducation de McGill, 2022-03-31)
    This study examines how one teacher supported low-achieving students’ self-regulated learning (SRL) in the context of a secondary mathematics class. The teacher’s scaffolding provided students with multiple opportunities to use feedback and adapt learning and study strategies. Data compared pre- and postmeasures of metacognitive skills, motivational beliefs, and learning and study behaviours, and examined the effects of directed practice on students’ developing SRL as well as their mathematics achievement. Results suggest the need for more research into the effects of individualized, targeted supports, particularly in assisting students in using metacognitive feedback to adapt learning strategies.
  • Co-operative inquiry: A research policy method for secondary education in Nigeria

    Olayiwola, Shina (McGill Journal of Education / Revue des sciences de l'éducation de McGillRevue des sciences de l'éducation de McGill, 2022-03-31)
    This article examines the level of research involvement among educational stakeholders in the process of educational policy-making and implementation in Nigeria. It attributes the transformational challenges confronting the secondary school system in Nigeria to the epistemological question: “What is the relationship between the knower or would-be knower and what can be known?” This is premised on the idea that the research process that led to the 6-3-3-4, or the “new” 9-3-4 system of education from the 6-5-2-3 system of education, did not involve the participants as co-researchers and co-subjects in their relationship. This article argues for co-operative inquiry as an alternative participatory, action research method for ameliorating these transformational challenges in the Nigerian secondary school system.
  • A review of It’s not free speech: Race, democracy, and the future of academic freedom

    Ribaric, Tim (McGill Journal of Education / Revue des sciences de l'éducation de McGillRevue des sciences de l'éducation de McGill, 2022-03-31)
  • On in-ness: What Cégep teaching keeps teaching me

    Olszanowski, Magdalena (McGill Journal of Education / Revue des sciences de l'éducation de McGillRevue des sciences de l'éducation de McGill, 2022-03-31)
    A first-person essay on the ways that Cégep teaching is different from teaching at a university. The reflection explores how belonging — an "in-ness" — is enacted within a creative arts department by focusing on various experiences from being hired to navigating teaching online during the pandemic. By doing so, the author recognizes how they come to understand and promulgate belonging in the classroom.
  • Behind the Lectern: The motivating instability of teaching

    Provost, Terry (McGill Journal of Education / Revue des sciences de l'éducation de McGillRevue des sciences de l'éducation de McGill, 2022-03-31)
    This response piece engages in the conversation initiated by Maggie McDonnell and Teresa Strong-Wilson on professional identity. It ponders the question of my role as a college-level professor of art history. Whereas numerous academic institutions have started to decolonise curricula to promote diverse perspectives, certain students, believing multiculturalism applies to all across the board, show indifference in learning decolonised points of view. Here, I examine some of these challenges and the several sides of my role as teacher.
  • A review of Teaching adult immigrants with limited formal education: Theory, research and practice

    Hardin, Kate (McGill Journal of Education / Revue des sciences de l'éducation de McGillRevue des sciences de l'éducation de McGill, 2022-03-31)
  • Volume 57 Numéro 2: Éditorial

    McGill Journal of Education / Revue des sciences de l'éducation de McGillRevue des sciences de l'éducation de McGill, 2022-03-31
  • Examining behavioural difficulties management practices reported by pre-and elementary school teachers: Relations with individual and contextual characteristics

    Nadeau, Marie-France; Massé, Line; Verret, Claudia; Gaudreau, Nancy; Lagacé-Leblanc, Jeanne (McGill Journal of Education / Revue des sciences de l'éducation de McGillRevue des sciences de l'éducation de McGill, 2022-03-31)
    This study examined the use of inclusive practices by 1,373 Quebec teachers to promote prosocial behaviour, according to their individual and contextual characteristics. Two questionnaires were used: a sociodemographic and a validated Classroom Behaviour Management Practices Inventory (N = 68 items; 2 dimensions/7 scales α = .70 to .90). Results from descriptive and univariate variance analysis showed that proactive /positive dimension practices (e.g., rules, instructional, reinforcement-based) are used more frequently than reductive dimension practices (e.g., educational consequences), although some of the latter are frequently used. Hierarchical models indicate significant interrelationships with teachers characteristics and the scales of classroom behaviour management practices, but for a small proportion of explained variance.
  • A review of Learning through community engagement: Vision and practice in higher education

    Grenier, Marie-Lyne (McGill Journal of Education / Revue des sciences de l'éducation de McGillRevue des sciences de l'éducation de McGill, 2022-03-31)
  • Lessons from the junk drawer: Possibilities for sustainability in art education

    Stendel, Jackie (McGill Journal of Education / Revue des sciences de l'éducation de McGillRevue des sciences de l'éducation de McGill, 2022-03-31)
    From planetary warming and natural disasters to pollution and community unrest, the sensorium of the climate crisis pervades our daily life. Art education has the potential to help us better understand the sensory reality of the climate crisis. However, the materials used in artistic creation are ecologically unsustainable and therefore may hinder learner’s connection to ecology. Through exploring the metaphor of the junk drawer, the author positions materials as potential teachers and, subsequently, as important parts of meaningful teaching and learning. The article explores the pedagogical impacts of different art materials while arguing that sustainable materials can lead to eco-consciousness for educators and students.   
  • (Un)making the grade: An instructor’s guide to mitigating the negative impacts of grades within a neoliberal university system

    Brook, Adriana (McGill Journal of Education / Revue des sciences de l'éducation de McGillRevue des sciences de l'éducation de McGill, 2022-03-31)
    Critics of the neoliberal university argue that grading undermines student learning. In this article, I survey the literature in order to ascertain whether such critiques are supported by pedagogical research. Investigating the relationship between grading and motivation, feedback, and autonomy, respectively, I conclude that grades most often do undercut learning. I explore the implications for instructors at Canadian universities, suggesting that abandoning grades is currently neither feasible nor best for students. I propose pragmatic adaptations to common grading practices that better promote learning and conclude that the implementation of less grade-centric assessment strategies is not only the best way to support student learning but also a way to challenge and mitigate the influences of neoliberal ideology in higher education. 

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