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dc.contributor.authorFlügel, Peter
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-25T09:33:17Z
dc.date.available2019-09-25T09:33:17Z
dc.date.created2013-12-17 11:17
dc.date.issued2011
dc.identifier.issn1748-1074
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12424/197964
dc.description.abstractThe analysis of the process of gradual integration of religious artefacts into the originally anti-iconic protestant Jaina traditions, starting with relics of renowned saints, and the evolution of pilgrimage centres from the early nineteenth century onwards shows that it followed the same logic as proposed by the theory of aniconism for the development of anthropomorphic images in ancient India: relics, stūpas, aniconic representations, anthropomorphic iconoplastic representations. It is argued in this article that it is unlikely that extant aniconic Jaina religious art from ancient India evolved along similar lines for at least four reasons: The absence of (1) doctrinal aniconism in early Jainism, (2) of a notable cult of the relics of the Jina, (3) of evidence for Jaina stūpas antedating anthropomorphic miniature reliefs, and (4) of sharply demarcated Jaina sectarian traditions before the Digambara-Śvetambara split. The reputedly oldest iconographic evidence from Mathurā rather suggests a parallel evolution of iconic and aniconic representations; with footprint/foot-images (caraṇa-pādukā) as a relatively late addition to the vocabulary of aniconic Jaina art. The apocryphal development of aniconic iconography in protestant Jaina traditions with progressive emphasis on the individual identity of renowned gurus and gurunīs of particular monastic traditions seems to replicate earlier developments in the iconic traditions which must have started in the early medieval period. The particular evolutionary sequence and selectivity of aniconic Jaina iconography with its characteristic exegetical impediments against the worship of Jina images and increasing emphasis on the practice of burial ad sanctos and cities of the dead however represents a genuine novelty not only in the history of Jainism but in Indian religious culture as a whole.
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherUniversity of London
dc.rightsCreative Commons Copyright (CC 2.5)
dc.subjectJainism
dc.subject.otherReligious ethics
dc.titleBurial Ad Sanctos at Jaina Sites in India
dc.typeArticle
dc.source.journaltitleInternational Journal of Jaina Studies
dc.source.volume7
dc.source.issue4
dc.source.beginpage1
dc.source.endpage37
dcterms.accessRightsopen access
refterms.dateFOA2019-09-25T09:33:17Z
ge.collectioncodeCG1223
ge.collectioncodeAA
ge.dataimportlabelGlobethics object
ge.identifier.legacyglobethics:5452617
ge.identifier.permalinkhttps://www.globethics.net/gel/5452617
ge.journalyear2011
ge.lastmodificationdate2018-10-30 16:47
ge.lastmodificationuseradmin@novalogix.ch
ge.submissions1
ge.peerreviewedyes
ge.placeofpublicationLondon (UK)
ge.setnameGlobeEthicsLib
ge.setnameGlobeTheoLib
ge.setspecglobeethicslib
ge.setspecglobetheolib
ge.submitter.emailvikasnprabhu@gmail.com
ge.submitter.namePrabhu, Vikas
ge.submitter.userid9114727


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