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dc.contributorKiser, Sarah (Author)
dc.contributorHekler, Eric B (Advisor)
dc.contributorOhri-Vachaspati, Punam (Committee member)
dc.contributorWharton, Christopher (Committee Member)
dc.contributorJohnston, Carol (Committee member)
dc.contributorArizona State University (Publisher)
dc.date.accessioned2019-10-27T04:10:57Z
dc.date.available2019-10-27T04:10:57Z
dc.date.created2018-04-14 23:23
dc.date.issued2013
dc.identifieroai:item:16471
dc.identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/2286/R.I.16471
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12424/2057695
dc.description.abstractabstract: Background: Previous research suggests a healthy eater schema (i.e., identifying yourself as a healthy eater) may be a useful concept to target in interventions. A "stealth" intervention that discussed the moral issues related to food worked better at promoting healthful eating than an intervention focused on the health benefits. No research has explored the relationship between moral foundations, a theoretical model focused on delineating core "foundations" for making a moral decision, and healthy eater self-identity or self-efficacy. Purpose: We explored the relationship between moral foundations (i.e., harm/care, fairness/reciprocity, in-group/loyalty, authority/respect, & purity/sanctity) and health eater self-identity and fruit and vegetable self-efficacy (FVSE). Methods: 542 participants completed an online cross-sectional survey, which included moral foundations (i.e., MFQ), political views, healthy eater self-identity (i.e., HESS), and FVSE measures. Logistic regression was used to assess the relationship between moral foundations between healthy eater self-identity after controlling for age, gender, major, BMI, and political beliefs. OLS regression was used to explore the relationship between self-efficacy and the moral foundations after controlling for the covariates. Results: 75.6% of the sample were college students, with a mean age of 25.27 (SD=8.61). 25.1% of students were nutrition majors. Harm/care, authority/respect, and ingroup/loyalty were significantly associated with healthy eater schema, (i.e., OR=1.7, p<.001, OR=1.5, p=.009, and OR=1.4, p=.027, respectively). Ingroup/loyalty, authority/respect, and purity/sanctity were related to FVSE (p=.006, p=.002, p=.04, respectively). Conclusion: Among college students, harm/care and authority/respect were associated with a healthy eater schema. Future research should explore possible uses of these moral foundations in interventions (e.g., a plant-based diet based on reduced harm to animals or eating fewer processed views based on "traditional" values).
dc.description.abstractDissertation/Thesis
dc.description.abstractM.S. Nutrition 2013
dc.format.medium84 pages
dc.language.isoeng
dc.rightsAll Rights Reserved
dc.subjectBehavioral sciences
dc.subjectNutrition
dc.subjecthealthy eater self-identity
dc.subjectMoral Foundations
dc.subjectself-efficacy
dc.subjectSelf-identity
dc.subjectSelf-schema
dc.titleAssociations Between Moral Foundations and Healthy Eating Identity and Self-Efficacy
dc.typeMasters Thesis
ge.collectioncodeOAIDATA
ge.dataimportlabelOAI metadata object
ge.identifier.legacyglobethics:14406880
ge.identifier.permalinkhttps://www.globethics.net/gel/14406880
ge.lastmodificationdate2018-04-14 23:23
ge.lastmodificationuseradmin@pointsoftware.ch (import)
ge.submissions0
ge.oai.exportid148650
ge.oai.repositoryid99280
ge.oai.setnameASU Electronic Theses and Dissertations
ge.oai.setnameContent Considered Research
ge.oai.setspeccollections:7
ge.oai.setspecresearch
ge.oai.streamid2
ge.setnameGlobeEthicsLib
ge.setspecglobeethicslib
ge.linkhttp://hdl.handle.net/2286/R.I.16471


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