• Barriers and facilitators to antiretroviral medication adherence among HIV-infected paediatric patients in Ethiopia: A qualitative study

      A Deribew; S Biadgilign; A Amberbir; K Deribe (SAHARA J (Journal of Social Aspects of HIV/AIDS Research Alliance), 2010-02-05)
      Medication adherence is a complex behaviour with multiple determinants. Understanding the barriers and facilitators of adherence is invaluable for programme improvement, which assists the foundation of adherence intervention strategies. A qualitative study was conducted in six selected hospitals of Addis Ababa in 2008, to explore barriers and facilitators to antiretroviral medication adherence among HIV-infected paediatric patients. Twelve caregivers of adherent and non-adherent children and 14 key informants in five hospitals were included in the study. The findings revealed that over-dosage (heavy pill burden), fear of stigma and discrimination, cost and access to transportation, lack of understanding of the benefit of taking the medication, economic problems in the household, and lack of nutritional support were the barriers to adherence to HAART. The presence of mobile/wall alarm, the presence of follow-up counselling, improved health of the child, ART clinic setups, and disclosure of HIV serostatus were among the facilitators. This study indicated that paediatric adherence to antiretroviral therapy faces a huge challenge. It suggests the provision of income-generating schemes to caregivers for assisting HIV-infected children. Health care providers should address proper usageof medication reminders.Keywords: HIV/AIDS, adherence, antiretroviral therapy, children, Ethiopia
    • Barriers and facilitators to patients\' adherence to antiretroviral treatment in Zambia: a qualitative study

      N Sanjobo; JC Frich; A Fretheim (SAHARA J (Journal of Social Aspects of HIV/AIDS Research Alliance), 2009-01-07)
      Patients\' adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) is important for effective medical treatment of HIV/AIDS. We conducted a qualitative interview study in the Copperbelt Province of Zambia in 2006. The aim of the study was to explore patients\' and health care professionals\' perceived barriers and facilitators to patients\' adherence to ART. Based on data from individual interviews and focus group interviews with a total of 60 patients and 12 health care professionals, we identified barriers and facilitators related to patients\' beliefs and behaviours, the health service, and socio-economic and cultural factors. Among the barriers we identified were lack of communication and information about ART, inadequate time during consultations, lack of follow-up and counselling, forgetfulness, stigma, discrimination and disclosure of HIV status, lack of confidentiality in the treatment centres, and lack of nutritional support. Feeling better, prospects of living longer, family support, information about ART, support for income-generating activities, disclosure of HIV status, prayers and transport support were among the facilitators. Our study suggests that several issues need to be considered when providing ART. Further research is needed to study interactions between patients and their health care providers. Our findings can inform interventions to improve adherence to ART. Keywords: AIDS, HIV, antiretroviral therapy, adherence, patient compliance, delivery of health care.SAHARA-J Vol. 5 (3) 2008: pp. 136-143
    • Blood-borne HIV: Risks and Prevention

      S Ramlagan (SAHARA J (Journal of Social Aspects of HIV/AIDS Research Alliance), 2010-01-20)
      By Mariette Correa, David Gisselquist and Deodatta Hari Gore. Hyderabad: Orient Longman Private Ltd. ISBN 13: 978-81-250-3462-9 and ISBN 10: 81-250-3462-5This is a 91-page book written to fill the gap that exists in public education about HIV prevention. The book focuses on the country of India, where public discussion of HIV risk concentrates on sexual transmission and overlooks blood exposures.
    • Book Review HIV/AIDS and agriculture in Sub-Saharan Africa: impact on farming systems, agricultural practices and rural livelihoods – an overview and annotated bibliography By Tania R Muller (2004)

      S Drimie; Human Sciences Research Council, South Africa (SAHARA J (Journal of Social Aspects of HIV/AIDS Research Alliance), 2005-10-13)
      Academic Publishers,The Netherlands, 2004.ISBN: 9076998469.Journal of Social Aspects of HIV/AIDS Vol 2(2) 2005: 296-297
    • Book Review: Living with AIDS in Uganda: Impacts on Banana-Farming Households in Two Districts

      J Seager (SAHARA J (Journal of Social Aspects of HIV/AIDS Research Alliance), 2010-01-20)
      By Monica Karuhanga Beraho, African women leaders in agriculture and the environment (AWLAE) Series No. 6, Wageningen: Wageningen Academic Publishers. 2008. 371pp. ISBN 978-90-8686-064-7The book is essentially a doctoral thesis and, as such, offers a very detailed study of the impact of AIDS on banana-farming households in two Ugandan districts. Being based on a thesis means that it should not be regarded as a general text on AIDS and livelihoods, but it does offer many insights into the reality of living with AIDS in these specific communities.
    • Book ReviewHIV in South Africa By SS Abdool Karim and Q Abdool Karim (Editors) (2005)

      Shandir Ramlagan; Human Research Council, South Africa (SAHARA J (Journal of Social Aspects of HIV/AIDS Research Alliance), 2006-04-26)
      Cape Town: Cambridge University PressISBN-13 978-0-521-61629-4ISBN-10 0-521-61629-8 SAHARA J (Journal of Social Aspects of HIV/AIDS Research Alliance) Vol. 2(3) 2005: 352-353
    • Book ReviewHIV/AIDS and Democratic Governance in South Africa: Illustrating the Impact on Electoral ProcessesBy Per Strand, Khabele Matlosa, Ann Strode & Kondwani Chirambo (2005)

      Sarah Pugh; Dalhousie University, Canada (SAHARA J (Journal of Social Aspects of HIV/AIDS Research Alliance), 2006-04-26)
      Institute for Democracy in South Africa (IDASA), Pretoria, South AfricaISBN 1-919798-80-3 SAHARA J (Journal of Social Aspects of HIV/AIDS Research Alliance) Vol. 2(3) 2005: 354-355
    • Book ReviewHIV/AIDS and Democratic Governance in South Africa: Illustrating the Impact on Electoral ProcessesBy Per Strand, Khabele Matlosa, Ann Strode & Kondwani Chirambo (2005)

      Pugh, Sarah; Dalhousie University, Canada (Taylor & Francis, 2006-04-26)
      Institute for Democracy in South Africa (IDASA), Pretoria, South AfricaISBN 1-919798-80-3 SAHARA J (Journal of Social Aspects of HIV/AIDS Research Alliance) Vol. 2(3) 2005: 354-355
    • Book ReviewHIV/AIDS and Democratic Governance in South Africa: Illustrating the Impact on Electoral ProcessesBy Per Strand, Khabele Matlosa, Ann Strode & Kondwani Chirambo (2005)

      Pugh, Sarah; Dalhousie University, Canada (Taylor & Francis, 2006-04-26)
      Institute for Democracy in South Africa (IDASA), Pretoria, South AfricaISBN 1-919798-80-3 SAHARA J (Journal of Social Aspects of HIV/AIDS Research Alliance) Vol. 2(3) 2005: 354-355
    • Book ReviewHIV/AIDS, gender and rural livelihoods in Sub-Saharan Africa: african women leaders in agriculture and environmentBy Tania R Muller (2005)

      J Seeley; University of East Anglia, UK (SAHARA J (Journal of Social Aspects of HIV/AIDS Research Alliance), 2005-10-13)
      Academic Publishers,The Netherlands, 2005.ISBN: 9076998493.Journal of Social Aspects of HIV/AIDS Vol 2(2) 2005: 297-298
    • Book ReviewThe Health of our Educators: Focus on HIV/AIDS in South African Public SchoolsBy O Shisana, K Peltzer, N Zungu-Dirwayi & JS Louw (Editors) (2005)

      Malcolm MacLachlan; Centre for Global Health and School of Psychology, Trinity College, Dublin (SAHARA J (Journal of Social Aspects of HIV/AIDS Research Alliance), 2006-04-26)
      Cape Town: HSRC SAHARA J (Journal of Social Aspects of HIV/AIDS Research Alliance) Vol. 2(3) 2005: 355-356
    • Book ReviewThe Health of our Educators: Focus on HIV/AIDS in South African Public SchoolsBy O Shisana, K Peltzer, N Zungu-Dirwayi & JS Louw (Editors) (2005)

      MacLachlan, Malcolm; Centre for Global Health and School of Psychology, Trinity College, Dublin (Taylor & Francis, 2006-04-26)
      Cape Town: HSRC SAHARA J (Journal of Social Aspects of HIV/AIDS Research Alliance) Vol. 2(3) 2005: 355-356
    • Book ReviewThe Health of our Educators: Focus on HIV/AIDS in South African Public SchoolsBy O Shisana, K Peltzer, N Zungu-Dirwayi & JS Louw (Editors) (2005)

      MacLachlan, Malcolm; Centre for Global Health and School of Psychology, Trinity College, Dublin (Taylor & Francis, 2006-04-26)
      Cape Town: HSRC SAHARA J (Journal of Social Aspects of HIV/AIDS Research Alliance) Vol. 2(3) 2005: 355-356
    • Challenges impacting on the quality of care to persons living with HIV/AIDS and other terminal illnesses with reference to Kanye community home-based care programme

      S Kang’ethe (SAHARA J (Journal of Social Aspects of HIV/AIDS Research Alliance), 2010-01-20)
      HIV/AIDS has been found to be a challenging disease to humanity, its challenge spin-offs falling especially on to the caregivers of those infected and affected by the virus. This paper aims to discuss the challenges influencing the state of caregiving in the Kanye community home-based care (CHBC) programme in Botswana. The study was qualitative in design and explorative in nature, involving 82 primary caregivers in focus group discussions, and 5 CHBC nurses in individual interviews. Caregivers were found challenged by lack of community networks support, inadequate sanitary and care packages, poor shelter compromising privacy, inadequate income and food for their clients, inadequate care motivation as their volunteerism does not attract any payment, inadequate health personnel to offer psychosocial support like counselling, and an unconducive caring environment generally. Putting in place policies to redress caregivers’ poverty, helping caregivers start income-generating projects, increasing community assistance and caregiving facilities are recommended as factors to address caregiver challenges.
    • Changes in sexual behaviour and practice and HIV prevalence indicators among young people aged 15–24 years in Zambia: An in-depth analysis of the 2001–2002 and 2007 Zambia Demographic and Health Surveys

      Kembo, J (Taylor & Francis, 2014-11-21)
      HIV and AIDS still pose a major public health problem to most countries in sub-Saharan Africa, Zambia included. The objective of the paper is to determine changes in selected sexual behaviour and practice and HIV prevalence indicators between 2001–2002 and 2007. We used the Demographic and Health Survey Indicators Database for the computation of the selected indicators. We further used STATA 10.0 to compute significance tests to test for statistical difference in the indicators. The results indicate some changes in sexual behaviour, as indicated by an increase in abstinence, use of condoms and the decrease in multiple partnerships. The overall percentage of abstinence among never-married young men and women aged 15–24 years in Zambia increased significantly by 15.2% (p = .000) and 5.9% (p = .001) respectively, between 2001–2002 and 2007. A statistically significant increase of 6.6% (p = .029) was observed in the percentage of young women who reported having used a condom during the last time they had had premarital sex. A statistically significant decrease of 11.0% (p = .000) and 1.4% (p = .000) was observed among young men and women, respectively, who reported having multiple partners in the preceding 12 months. The factorial decomposition using multivariate analysis reveals that the indicators which contributed to the statistically significant 2.6% decline in HIV prevalence among young women aged 15–24 years in Zambia include proportion reporting condom use during premarital sex (+6.6%), abstinence (+5.9%), sex before age 15 (24.5%), premarital sex (22.6%), sex before age 18 (22.4%) and proportion reporting multiple partnerships (21.4%). Remarkable strides have been achieved towards promoting responsible sexual behaviour and practice among young people in Zambia. Further research focusing on factors that predispose young women in Zambia to higher risk of infection from HIV is required. The results from this paper should be useful in the design of programmes to control the spread of HIV and AIDS, particularly among young people in Zambia and other sub-Saharan countries.Keywords: sexual behaviour and practice, young people, Demographic and Health Survey, HIV and AIDS, Zambia
    • Changing trends and the impact of alcohol on the HIV/AIDS epidemic in South Africa: Review

      Setshedi, M; de la Monte, SM (Taylor & Francis, 2011-06-28)
      The association between increased HIV infection and alcohol use has been extensively studied and is established. South Africa is among one of the sub-Saharan African countries with the highest prevalence and number of people living with HIV/AIDS in the world. Although recent evidence suggests that the epidemic has stabilised, infection rates remain unacceptably high. Alcohol use is on the increase, particularly in the groups most susceptible to HIV infection, namely women and young adults, and informs poor choices with respect to safer sexual practices. This paper reviews the association between alcohol and HIV. More specifically, however, it aims to explore the potential socio-politico-biological and cultural explanations as to the factors that intersect to drive these two epidemic diseases: alcoholism and HIV/AIDS in South Africa. Understanding some of the underlying factors will provide a framework to implement public health measures to curb HIV.Keywords: HIV, AIDS, South Africa, alcohol, politics of South Africa.L’association entre l’augmentation du VIH et la consommation d’alcool fait l’objet d’une étude. L’Afrique du Sud reste l’un des pays Sub-Saharien les plus touché par un taux de prévalence élevé et par le nombre de personnes vivant avec le VIH/SIDA dans le monde. Bien que les dernières objectives fussent de stabiliser l’épidémie, néanmoins le taux d’infection reste inacceptable. L’utilisation de l’alcool, particulièrement chez les femmes et les jeunes, est susceptible d’augmenter l’infection du VIH, et le peu d’information qu’ils ont sur le respect des pratiques sexuels sûr. L’article examine le lien entre l’association de l’alcool et le VIH, plus spécifiquement, cependant elle vise à explorer des explications potentielles socio-politico-culturelles et biologiques sur les facteurs de ces maladies épidémiques alcoolisme et le VIH/SIDA en Afrique du Sud. Il faut comprendre que les facteurs sous-jacents fourniront un cadre pour mettre en oeuvre des mesures de santé publique pour lutter contre le VIH.
    • ‘Checkmating HIV&AIDS’: Using chess to break the silence in the classroom

      Esau, O (Taylor & Francis, 2012-12-13)
      In this article, I give an account of my ‘Checkmating HIV&AIDS’ action research project, which was an attempt to break the ‘culture of silence’ concerning HIV&AIDS and sex and sexuality in my classroom. In this project, I focused specifically on one code of sport, namely chess, and I point out and discuss the potential of using chess as an educational tool in addressing HIV&AIDS. It was found that learners enjoy playing chess and that it can be used in the Life Orientation classroom to promote HIV&AIDS awareness. This type of alternative awareness is relevant as learners in most schools were becoming fatigued by HIV&AIDS information overload. The project portrays the role of the teacher as a researcher and critical change agent in an HIV&AIDS-challenged society.Keywords: HIV&AIDS, action research, chess, checkmating, culture of silence, prevention, awareness
    • ‘Checkmating HIV&AIDS’: Using chess to break the silence in the classroom

      Esau, O (Taylor & Francis, 2012-12-13)
      In this article, I give an account of my ‘Checkmating HIV&AIDS’ action research project, which was an attempt to break the ‘culture of silence’ concerning HIV&AIDS and sex and sexuality in my classroom. In this project, I focused specifically on one code of sport, namely chess, and I point out and discuss the potential of using chess as an educational tool in addressing HIV&AIDS. It was found that learners enjoy playing chess and that it can be used in the Life Orientation classroom to promote HIV&AIDS awareness. This type of alternative awareness is relevant as learners in most schools were becoming fatigued by HIV&AIDS information overload. The project portrays the role of the teacher as a researcher and critical change agent in an HIV&AIDS-challenged society.Keywords: HIV&AIDS, action research, chess, checkmating, culture of silence, prevention, awareness
    • Ciliated hepatic foregut cyst: a rare cystic liver lesion

      JM Shaw; SJ Beninfield; JEJ Krige (SAHARA J (Journal of Social Aspects of HIV/AIDS Research Alliance), 2008-07-14)
      No Abstract.
    • ‘Clinics aren’t meant for men’: Sexual health care access and seeking behaviours among men in Gauteng province, South Africa

      Leichliter, JS; Paz-Bailey, G; Friedman, AL; Habel, MA; Vezi, A; Sello, M; Farirai, T; Lewis, DA (Taylor & Francis, 2011-06-28)
      Men may be key players in the transmission of sexually transmitted infections (STI), and it is important that STI/HIV health services reach men. The objective of this study was to explore sexual health care access and seeking behaviours in men. This study used focus groups to examine sexual health care access and seeking behaviours in men 5 years after implementation of free antiretroviral therapy (ART) in the South African public sector. Six focus groups (N=58) were conducted with men ≥18 years in an urban area of Gauteng province. Men were recruited from various locations throughout the community. Men reported several barriers and facilitators to the use of public and private clinics for sexual health services including HIV testing, and many men reported seeking care from traditional healers. Men often viewed public clinics as a place for women and reported experiences with some female nurses who were rude or judgmental of the men. Additionally, some men reported that they sought sexual health care services at public clinics; however, they were not given physical examinations by health care providers to diagnose their STI syndrome. Most men lacked knowledge about ART and avoided HIV testing because of fear of death or being abandoned by their families or friends. Study findings suggest that men still require better access to high-quality, non-judgmental sexual health care services. Future research is needed to determine the most effective method to increase men’s access to sexual health care services.Keywords: sexual health care access, men.Les hommes peuvent être des responsables dans la transmission des infections sexuellement transmissibles (IST), et il est important que les services de santé des IST/VIH les sensibilisent (les hommes). Les objectifs de cette étude étaient d’examiner l’accès aux soins de santé et les comportements sexuels des hommes pendant 5 ans après la mise en oeuvre de la thérapie antirétrovirale (ART) gratuite dans le secteur public Sud-Africain. Six groups d’hommes âgés ≥18 ans (N=58) ont menés des discussions dans la zone urbaine de la province de Gauteng. Ces hommes sont recrutés dans divers endroits dans toute la communauté. Ils ont déclarés rencontrés des obstacles et facilitateurs à l’accès des cliniques publiques et privées des services de santé sexuelle, y compris le test du VIH, et beaucoup d’hommes déclarent être à la recherche de soins vers des guérisseurs traditionnels. Les hommes ont souvent vu les cliniques publiques comme des endroits pour les femmes et se sont souvent plaint des expériences qu’ils ont eues par rapport aux infirmières qui ont un mauvais jugement sur eux. Certains d’entre eux ont déclaré qu’ils cherchaient des soins de santé dans les cliniques publiques, mais qu’ils n’étaient pas soumis à des examens physiques pour diagnostiquer leurs syndrome d’IST. La plupart d’entre eux n’avaient pas de connaissances de l’ART et évitent le test du VIH parce qu’ils ont peur de la mort ou d’être abandonné par leurs familles ou leurs amis. Cette étude suggère que les hommes doivent exiger de meilleures qualités de soins, un non-jugement des services de santé sexuelle. Les recherches futures sont nécessaires pour déterminer la méthode la plus efficace d’accroitre l’accès des hommes aux services de santé sexuelle.