• ‘I can't go to her when I have a problem’: sexuality communication between South African adolescent girls and young women and their mothers

      Zoe Duby; Wilmé Verwoerd; Katja Isaksen; Kim Jonas; Kealeboga Maruping; Janan Dietrich; Ashleigh LoVette; Caroline Kuo; Catherine Mathews (Taylor & Francis Group, 2022-01-01)
      Parent–adolescent sexuality communication, the process in which parents and their adolescent children discuss sexuality and sexual and reproductive health, is a key component for adolescents’ protective behaviours. Open communication with parents, particularly mothers, enables informed sexual and reproductive health (SRH) decision-making amongst adolescent girls and young women (AGYW). As part of a qualitative study evaluating a South African combination HIV prevention intervention for AGYW, we explored perspectives on SRH communication among AGYW and mothers of AGYW, and the effects of the intervention on sexuality communication as perceived by AGYW, mothers of AGYW, intervention facilitators and implementers, and community leaders. In-depth interviews and focus group discussions were conducted with 185 AGYW aged 15–24 years who had participated in the intervention, seven mothers of AGYW intervention recipients, 14 intervention facilitators, six community leaders, and 12 intervention implementers. Key themes that emerged in analysis were (1) Barriers to Sexuality communication, (2) Implications of Gaps in Sexuality Communication, and (3) Addressing Barriers to Sexuality communication. Barriers to sexuality communication included inability or unwillingness to discuss sex, a generation gap, proscriptive socio-cultural guidelines, and mothers’ discomfort, lack of knowledge and self-efficacy, and fear of encouraging promiscuity. AGYW described making poorly-informed SRH decisions alone, expressing a desire for more open communication with and support from parents/mothers. Framed within the social cognitive theory, these findings can help to guide efforts to address barriers around parent–adolescent sexuality communication, inform interventions aimed at targeting SRH issues amongst AGYW, such as unintended pregnancy and HIV, and support meaningful engagement of parents in supporting AGYW in navigating pathways to achieving their SRH goals.
    • “I don't use a condom (with my regular partner) because I know that I'm faithful, but with everyone else I do”: The cultural and socioeconomic determinants of sexual partner concurrency in young South Africans

      Chris Kenyon; Andrew Boulle; Motasim Badri; Valerie Asselman (Taylor & Francis Group, 2010-10-01)
      Finding ways to reduce the high rates of sexual partner concurrency is increasingly believed to be vital to controlling HIV spread in southern Africa. We describe the frequency and correlates of sexual partner concurrency in a representative sample of 3 324 young South Africans aged 14–25. Of the 2 468 individuals who were sexually active 21% had engaged in concurrent sexual partnerships. Multivariate analysis revealed that concurrency was more common with males, Africans, those who knew their partner had another partner, early age of sexual debut, four or more lifetime sexual partners, alcohol consumption, and self-perception of being at high risk for acquisition of HIV. If the respondent's partner knew his or her friends (termed high structural embeddedness) this was associated with a 52% reduction in concurrency rates. There are significant differences in both the rates of concurrency and the risk factors underpinning these in the different racial/ethnic groups. Analysis of these underlying determinants suggests that cultural rather than socioeconomic factors predominate, which has important implications for the design and targeting of prevention efforts.
    • “I don’t use a condom (with my regular partner) because I know that I’m faithful, but with everyone else I do”: The cultural and socioeconomic determinants of sexual partner concurrency in young South Africans

      Kenyon, C; Boulle, A; Badri, M; Asselman, V (Taylor & Francis, 2011-07-08)
      Finding ways to reduce the high rates of sexual partner concurrency is increasingly believed to be vital to controlling HIV spread in southern Africa. We describe the frequency and correlates of sexual partner concurrency in a representative sample of 3 324 young South Africans aged 14-25. Of the 2 468 individuals who were sexually active 21% had engaged in concurrent sexual partnerships. Multivariate analysis revealed that concurrency was more common with males, Africans, those who knew their partner had anotherpartner, early age of sexual debut, four or more lifetime sexual partners, alcohol consumption, and self-perception of being at high risk for acquisition of HIV. If the respondent’s partner knew his or her friends (termed high structural embeddedness) this was associated with a 52% reduction in concurrency rates. There are significant differences in both the rates of concurrency and the risk factors underpinning these in the different racial/ethnic groups. Analysis of these underlying determinants suggests that cultural rather than socioeconomic factors predominate, which has important implications for the design and targeting of prevention efforts.
    • ‘I just ended up here, no job and no health...' – men's outlook on life in the context of economic hardship and HIV/AIDS in Namibia

      Britt Pinkowsky Tersbøl; Public Health from the University of Copenhagen, Denmark (SAHARA J (Journal of Social Aspects of HIV/AIDS Research Alliance), 2007-02-08)
      Based on ethnographic material from northern and central Namibia, this article provides insight into the views and experiences of primarily unemployed and poor men, and the dilemmas with which they are confronted due to lack of life opportunities. For these men, poverty and lack of agency may lead to loss of meaning and identity. The article brings men's experiences into context by exploring the socio-economic and historical transitions which in powerful ways contribute to shaping men's lives. It argues that HIV/AIDS is but one of many pressing concerns, and therefore information campaigns to promote safe sexual practices have limited meaning and impact. It further argues that men, like women, but in different ways than women, are vulnerable to HIV/AIDS.To counter this situation, it is crucial that HIV/AIDS prevention efforts work with men specifically. If prevention programmes are to have any relevance and impact, they should take their starting point in men's experiences of social exclusion and existential doubt. Keywords: men, masculinity, economic hardship, HIV/AIDS, Namibia Résumé Basé sur le matériel ethnographique du nord et du centre de la Namibie, cette communication donne un aperçu des opinions et des expériences des hommes pauvres et essentiellement chômeurs et les dilemmes auxquels ils font face à cause du manque des occasions dans la vie. Pour ces hommes, la pauvreté et le manque d'urgence pourraient les conduire vers la perte d'identité et la raison de vivre. Cette communication met les expériences de ces hommes dans un contexte en examinant les transitions socio-économiques et historiques qui contribuent largement à façonner leurs vies. Cette présente avance un argument en disant que le VIH/SIDA n'est qu'un des soucis pressants. De ce fait, les campagnes qui favorisent des rapports sexuels protégés ont un sens et un impact assez limités. La présente avance aussi le fait que les hommes, comme pour les femmes, mais de maniére différente à celle de femmes, sont également vulnérables au VIH/SIDA. Pour aller à l'encontre de cette situation, il est essentiel que les efforts de prévention contre le VIH/SIDA visent les hommes en particulier. Pour que les programmes de prévention puissent avoir une pertinence et un impact, ils doivent commencer avec les expériences d'exclusion et de doute existentiel des hommes. Mots clés : hommes, masculinité, détresse économique,VIH/SIDA, Namibie.
    • ‘I just ended up here, no job and no health…’ — men's outlook on life in the context of economic hardship and HIV/AIDS in Namibia

      Britt Pinkowsky Tersbøl (Taylor & Francis Group, 2006-05-01)
      Based on ethnographic material from northern and central Namibia, this article provides insight into the views and experiences of primarily unemployed and poor men, and the dilemmas with which they are confronted due to lack of life opportunities. For these men, poverty and lack of agency may lead to loss of meaning and identity. The article brings men's experiences into context by exploring the socio-economic and historical transitions which in powerful ways contribute to shaping men's lives. It argues that HIV/AIDS is but one of many pressing concerns, and therefore information campaigns to promote safe sexual practices have limited meaning and impact. It further argues that men, like women, but in different ways than women, are vulnerable to HIV/AIDS. To counter this situation, it is crucial that HIV/AIDS prevention efforts work with men specifically. If prevention programmes are to have any relevance and impact, they should take their starting point in men's experiences of social exclusion and existential doubt.
    • ‘If you are found taking medicine, you will be called names and considered less of a man’: young men’s engagement with HIV treatment and care during ulwaluko (traditional initiation and circumcision) in the Eastern Cape Province of South Africa

      L. Gittings; R. Hodes; C. Colvin; S. Mbula; P. Kom (Taylor & Francis Group, 2021-01-01)
      This paper explores how HIV-positive abakhwetha (young male initiates) undergoing ulwaluko (traditional Xhosa initiation and circumcision) engage with HIV-related biomedical care and treatment. Health-focused life history narratives (n = 36), semi-structured interviews (n = 32) and analysis of health facility files (n = 41) with adolescent boys and young men (ages 13–24) living with HIV, and semi-structured interviews with traditional and biomedical health practitioners (n = 14) were conducted in 2017 and 2018. This research was part of the Mzantsi Wakho study, a longitudinal, mixed methods study of adolescents living with HIV (n = 1060). Findings demonstrate that ulwaluko rules of not engaging with biomedical care and treatment pose a challenge for initiates who are taking chronic medicine. Fears of inadvertent disclosure of their HIV-positive status collide with the pressure to successfully complete ulwaluko in order to be legitimised as men. In response to this dilemma, they engage a variety of strategies – including taking medicine in secret by hiding them, having a trusted person deliver them discretely, and stopping medicine-taking altogether. The three months following ulwaluko also pose a challenge in accessing biomedical treatment and care. In this time of high surveillance, amakrwala (new men) do not present at health facilities for fear of being thought to have had a botched circumcision or to have contravened ‘manhood rules’ and left ulwaluko before having healed properly. To get around this, those who continued taking medicine engaged caregiver pick-ups. Beyond suggesting that ulwaluko is a high-risk time for disengagement from biomedical treatment and care, this paper builds on a robust scholarship on the importance of locality and context in gender and health research. It documents the creativity, agency and resilience of initiates and their families as they subvert and re-signify health-related masculine norms.
    • Impact of AIDS on rural livelihoods in Benue State, Nigeria

      Royal Tropical Institute, PO Box 95001, 1090 HA Amsterdam,The Netherlands; Thea Hilhorst; Royal Tropical Institute, PO Box 95001, 1090 HA Amsterdam,The Netherlands; Adiya V Ode; DFID, Nigeria; Korrie de Koning; Department of Development, Policy and Practice at KIT; Marti van Liere; Royal Tropical Institute, PO Box 95001, 1090 HA Amsterdam,The Netherlands (SAHARA J (Journal of Social Aspects of HIV/AIDS Research Alliance), 2007-02-08)
      This study addresses the socio-economic impact of AIDS on rural livelihoods in Benue State, Nigeria, where HIV prevalence is 9.3% but the number of AIDS cases is still relatively low. About 6% of the study households had experienced illness and death classified as AIDS, and reported high costs in terms of expenditures and time spent on care, funerals and mourning.These demands on time affected income and productivity, while the diversion of resources had implications for investments and savings. Coping strategies varied between households, mainly as a reflection of asset levels, which were often related to the gender of the household head. Reported coping strategies also differed between ethnic groups. First-line relatives were the most important source of support for households under pressure. Erosive coping strategies that undermined the sustainability of livelihoods were used by more vulnerable households following multiple cases of illness and death. Mourning practices, rules of inheritance and stigma tended to increase a household's vulnerability. Currently, Benue State is facing growing adult morbidity and mortality because of HIV infections. A context-specific study of its possible impact in a setting with a still relatively low number of AIDS cases is therefore important for informing local policy development and for building advocacy. Keywords: HIV/AIDS, impact assessment, livelihoods, Nigeria. Résumé Cette étude aborde l'impact socio-économique du SIDA sur les moyens d'existence ruraux à Benue State, au Nigéria où la prédominance du VIH est de 9.3% alors que le nombre de cas du SIDA sont relativement bas. Presque 6% de foyers d'étude ont fait face à la maladie et la mort liées au SIDA. Ces mêmes foyers ont signalé que le coût est très élevé en matière de dépenses et de temps perdu sur le soin, les obsèques et le deuil. Ces exigences ont eu un effet sur le revenu et la productivité en matière de temps pendant que le détournement de ressources a eu des implications sur les investissements et les épargnes. Les stratégies de faire face ont été variées d'un foyer à l'autre surtout comme un reflet du niveau des atouts. Ces derniers sont souvent liés au sexe de la tête de famille. Les stratégies de faire face signalées étaient différentes entre les groupes ethniques. La famille plus proche était la source de soutien la plus importante aux foyers sous pression. Les stratégies érosives de faire face qui ont ébranlé l'existence bien soutenue de moyens de vivre ont été utilisées par les foyers les plus vulnérables après avoir fait face aux cas multiples de maladies et de morts. Les coutumes de deuil, les règlements de l'héritage et la stigmatisation ont tendance à augmenter la vulnérabilité du foyer. Actuellement, Benue State subit la croissance de morbidité et de mortalité des adultes à cause des infections du VIH. Une étude spécifique au contexte de son impact possible dans un milieu qui compte un nombre relativement bas des cas du SIDA est importante pour guider le développement d'une politique locale et pour bâtir le plaidoyer. Mots clés:VIH/SIDA, évaluation de l'impact, socio-économique, mode de vie, le Nigéria.
    • Impact of AIDS on rural livelihoods in Benue State, Nigeria

      Thea Hilhorst; Marti van Liere; Adiya V Ode; Korrie de Koning (Taylor & Francis Group, 2006-05-01)
      This study addresses the socio-economic impact of AIDS on rural livelihoods in Benue State, Nigeria, where HIV prevalence is 9.3% but the number of AIDS cases is still relatively low. About 6% of the study households had experienced illness and death classified as AIDS, and reported high costs in terms of expenditures and time spent on care, funerals and mourning. These demands on time affected income and productivity, while the diversion of resources had implications for investments and savings. Coping strategies varied between households, mainly as a reflection of asset levels, which were often related to the gender of the household head. Reported coping strategies also differed between ethnic groups. First-line relatives were the most important source of support for households under pressure. Erosive coping strategies that undermined the sustainability of livelihoods were used by more vulnerable households following multiple cases of illness and death. Mourning practices, rules of inheritance and stigma tended to increase a household's vulnerability. Currently, Benue State is facing growing adult morbidity and mortality because of HIV infections. A context-specific study of its possible impact in a setting with a still relatively low number of AIDS cases is therefore important for informing local policy development and for building advocacy.
    • Impact of long-term civil disorders and wars on the trajectory of HIV epidemics in sub-Saharan Africa

      D Gisselquist; An independent consultant. 29 West Governor Road, Hershey, Pennsylvania 17033, USA.Tel. (1-717) 533-2364; fax (1-717) 835-0192 (SAHARA J (Journal of Social Aspects of HIV/AIDS Research Alliance), 2004-10-01)
      From the mid-1970s, seven countries in sub-Saharan Africa have experienced civil disorders and wars lasting for at least 10 years. In two Sierra Leone during 1991-2002, and Somalia from 1988 and continuing adult HIV prevalence remained below 1%. In the Democratic Republic of the Congo, HIV prevalence appears to have stabilised during post-1991 civil disorder and war. Limited information from Angola (civil war 1975 -2002) and Liberia (civil disorder and war from 1989 and continuing) suggests low HIV prevalence. Mozambique's HIV prevalence was near 1% after its 1975 - 1992 civil war, but increased dramatically in the first post-war decade. Across African countries with long-term wars, HIV seems to have spread more slowly than in most neighbouring countries at peace.This evidence contributes to the ongoing debate about the factors that explain differential epidemic trajectories, a debate which is crucial to the design of HIV prevention programmes. One possible explanation for slow epidemic growth in wartime is that unsterile health care accounts for an important proportion of HIV transmission during peacetime, but much less when wars disrupt health services. However, other explanations are also possible.The roles of sex and blood exposures in HIV epidemics in war and peace await empirical determination. SAHARA-J (2004) 1(2): 87-98 Keywords: HIV, epidemiology, Africa, wars, risk factors. RÉSUMÉ A partir du milieu des années 1970, sept pays de l'Afrique sous-Sahara ont connu des désordres civils et des guerres qui ont duré au moins 10 ans. Dans deux pays la Sierra Léone entre 1991 et 2002 et la Somalie depuis 1988 jusque-là la prédominance du VIH chez des adultes est restée sous 1%. Dans la République Démocratique du Congo, la prédominance du VIH s'est stabilisée après le désordre civil et la guerre de 1991. L'information très limitée de l'Angola (guerre civile 1975 - 2002) et de Libéria (désordre et guerre civils depuis 1989) suggère une prédominance du VIH très basse. Au Mozambique, la prédominance du VIH était d'environ 1% après la guerre civile de 1975 à 1992. Cependant, il y a eu une augmentation importante au cours de la première décennie après la guerre. Dans tous les pays africains qui ont subit des guerres à longue durée, le VIH semble se propager plus doucement que dans des pays voisins qui sont en période de paix. Cette preuve contribue au débat actuel portant sur des facteurs responsables aux trajectoires différentielles de l'épidémie. Ce débat est important à la conception des programmes de prévention. Une explication possible de la dissémination lente de l'épidémie durant la guerre est que les soins non-stériles expliquent la proportion importante de transmission de VIH pendant la période de paix. Ce phénomène est encore plus réduit quand les services de santé sont interrompus par la guerre. Néanmoins, il y a d'autres explications possibles. Les rôles que jouent le sexe et la contamination par le sang sur l'épidémie du VIH pendant la guerre et durant la période de paix attendent une détermination empirique. . SAHARA-J (2004) 1(2): 87-98Mots clés: le VIH, I'épidémiologie, I'Afrique, les guerres, les facteurs de risque.
    • Impact of long-term civil disorders and wars on the trajectory of HIV epidemics in sub-Saharan Africa

      David Gisselquist (Taylor & Francis Group, 2004-08-01)
      From the mid-1970s, seven countries in sub-Saharan Africa have experienced civil disorders and wars lasting for at least 10 years. In two — Sierra Leone during 1991–2002, and Somalia from 1988 and continuing — adult HIV prevalence remained below 1%. In the Democratic Republic of the Congo, HIV prevalence appears to have stabilised during post-1991 civil disorder and war. Limited information from Angola (civil war 1975–2002) and Liberia (civil disorder and war from 1989 and continuing) suggests low HIV prevalence. Mozambique's HIV prevalence was near 1% after its 1975 – 1992 civil war, but increased dramatically in the first post-war decade. Across African countries with long-term wars, HIV seems to have spread more slowly than in most neighbouring countries at peace. This evidence contributes to the ongoing debate about the factors that explain differential epidemic trajectories, a debate which is crucial to the design of HIV prevention programmes. One possible explanation for slow epidemic growth in wartime is that unsterile health care accounts for an important proportion of HIV transmission during peacetime, but much less when wars disrupt health services. However, other explanations are also possible. The roles of sex and blood exposures in HIV epidemics in war and peace await empirical determination.
    • Innovations dans les approches, activités et résultats des conférences internationales sur le VIH/SIDA en Afrique — Le cas de la 3ème conférence africaine sur les aspects sociaux du VIH/SIDA, Dakar, 10 – 14 octobre 2005

      Cheikh Ibrahima Niang; O. Shisana; G. Andrews; D. Kaseje; L. Simbayi; K. Peltzer; Y. Toefy (Taylor & Francis Group, 2006-08-01)
      La situation du VIH/SIDA en Afrique demeure très préoccupante. L'impact du VIH est considérable et menace la survie et le développement des sociétés africaines. Bien qu'il y ait beaucoup d'efforts, les réponses ne sont pas encore à la hauteur des défis. Le SIDA apparaît comme étant une épidémie par rapport à laquelle il est nécessaire d'avoir beaucoup de créativité dans les initiatives. C'est dans ce cadre que la 3ème conférence africaine pour la recherche sur les aspects sociaux du VIH/SIDA a apporté des innovations dans la manière de concevoir les conférences internationales, dans les activités mises en oeuvre et dans les résultats obtenus.Les innovations portent sur la manière de penser les conférences internationales et tiennent compte de la reconceptualisation du VIH/SIDA qui privilégient des approches holistiques et une plus grande visibilité des groupes vulnérables. Les activités de la conférence avaient été organisées de sorte que les PVVIH, les communautés de base et les groupes marginalisés y jouent un rôle central. La conférence a été l'occasion de développer des activités culturelles qui traduisent les concepts culturels africains qui ont été considérés comme importants dans l'analyse de la situation et des réponses concernant le VIH. Les espaces interactifs créés par la conférence ont permis de parvenir à des analyses qui abordent différentes dimensions des déterminants politiques, culturels, économiques.La conférence a suscité une réflexion autour de la construction des réponses en mettant en exergue les thèmes de l'urgence et de l'accélération des réponses, de la construction de synergie, de coordination et de la conception de réponses politiques.
    • Introducing SAHARA J

      Taylor & Francis Group, 2004-05-01
    • Introducing SAHARA J / Introduction au Journal de SAHARA

      SAHARA J (Journal of Social Aspects of HIV/AIDS Research Alliance), 2004-07-14
      Social and behavioural patterns contribute more to the spread (or to the prevention) of an epidemic than the availability of medical treatment. Currently no cure or vaccine for HIV/AIDS is available and access to affordable antiretrovirals is still not available to the wider public. Thus, social and behavioural interventions become a key option to prevent and control the further spread of HIV/AIDS. By understanding the role that various psychosocial, cultural and religious factors play in the transmission of HIV infection in communities, possible strategies and options for prevention programmes can be developed. Social Aspects of HIV/AIDS and Health, Human Sciences Research Council (HSRC), South Africa, has established a Social Aspects of HIV/AIDS Research Alliance in sub-Saharan Africa (SAHARA), a vehicle for facilitating the sharing of research expertise, sharing knowledge, conducting multi-site multicountry research projects that are intervention-based with the explicit aim of generating new social science evidence for prevention, care and impact mitigation of the HIV/AIDS epidemic. We have begun to produce a peer-reviewed medium of communication of social aspects of HIV/AIDS evidence-based information that will be accessible to African scientists. Its output will be generated from the alliance SAHARA and wishes to encourage policy makers, programme planners, researchers in universities and fellow science councils, NGOs, community groups, donors and multilateral agencies. Africa has the highest burden on HIV/AIDS in the world. This must be overcome.The Journal of Social Aspects of HIV/AIDS is being launched precisely to tackle HIV/AIDS care, support, behaviour change, behavioural surveillance, counselling, impact, mitigation, stigma, discrimination, prevention, treatment, adherence, culture, faith-based approaches, evidence-based intervention, health communication, structural and environmental intervention, financing, policy, media, etc. Priority is given to articles which are relevant to Africa and the developing world and which address social issues related to HIV and AIDS. In particular, papers presented at the biannual International Conferences of HIV/AIDS and STI in Africa and biannual Social Aspects of HIV/AIDS Research Alliance (SAHARA) conferences are published.The journal is available in hard copy and online: Website: www.sahara.org.za Happy reading! The Editors Les comportements sociaux contribuent plus amplement à la propagation d'une épidémie (ou à sa prévention) que la disponibilité des traitements médicaux. A l'heure actuelle, il n'existe pas de remède ni de vaccin et l'accès aux rétroviraux n'est toujours pas abordable pour le grand public. Par conséquent, les interventions de type social et comportemental deviennent une option-clé pour la prévention et le contrôle de la propagation du VIH/SIDA. Comprendre le rôle joué par les différents facteurs psychosociaux, culturels et religieux dans la transmission du VIH au sein des communautés permet de penser des solutions, de mettre au point des stratégies dans le but de développer des programmes de prévention. Le Conseil de Recherche en Sciences Humaines (Human Sciences Research Council (HSRC) en Afrique du Sud et sa branche des Aspect Sociaux du VIH/SIDA et de la Santé ont créé l'Alliance pour la Recherche sur les Aspects Sociaux du VIH/SIDA en Afrique sub-saharienne (SAHARA). Il s'agit d'un véhicule voué à faciliter le partage de l'expertise en recherche, des connaissances, voué également à réaliser des projets de recherche multi-sites et multi-pays générateurs d'intervention et capables d'apporter de nouveaux témoignages en sciences sociales. Ces témoignages sont à leur tour utilisables en matière de prévention, de soins et de limitation de l'impact de l'épidémie du VIH/SIDA. Nous avons commencé à produire un moyen de communication sur les aspects sociaux du VIH/SIDA qui est revu par les pairs, fondé sur des témoignages et qui sera accessible aux scientifiques africains. Les informations qu'il contient proviennent de l'alliance SAHARA et ont pour but d'encourager les décideurs de politiques, les planificateurs de programmes, les chercheurs d'universités et leurs collègues des conseils scientifiques, les ONG, les groupes communautaires, les donateurs et les agences multilatérales. L'Afrique détient le plus haut taux de VIH/SIDA au monde. Nous devons vaincre ce fait. Nous sommes justement en train de lancer le Journal des Aspects Sociaux du VIH/SIDA pour s'attaquer aux questions de soins, soutien, changement de comportements, surveillance des comportements, conseil, impact, atténuation, opprobre, discrimination, prévention, traitement, adhésion, culture, approches fondées sur la foi, intervention fondée sur les témoignages, communication en matière de santé, intervention structurelle et d'environnement, financement, politique, média, etc. La priorité est donnée aux articles applicables à l'Afrique et qui traitent de sujets sociaux en rapport avec le VIH et le SIDA. Sont publiés en particulier, les articles présentés aux conférences internationales biannuelles du VIH/SIDA et au STI en Afrique, ainsi qu'aux conférences bi-annuelles de l'Alliance pour la Recherche sur les Aspects Sociaux du VIH/SIDA (SAHARA). Site Internet : www.sahara.org.za Bonne lecture ! Les Éditeurs
    • Investigating client satisfaction with antiretroviral treatment services in South-South Nigeria

      Omosivie Maduka (Taylor & Francis Group, 2019-01-01)
      Client satisfaction is a key method of evaluating the quality of healthcare services. This research investigated client satisfaction with anti-retroviral treatment services in selected outpatient facilities in Rivers State. This study was a qualitative study carried out in four antiretroviral treatment (ART) facilities in Rivers State, Nigeria. Researchers conducted nine Key Informant Interviews (KIIs), 25 In-depth interviews (IDIs) and eight Focus Group Discussion (FGDs) among 73 Persons Living with HIVs (PLHIVS) consisting of 31 males and 42 females, using a topic guide. Interviews were recorded, transcribed and analysed using thematic content analysis. Majority of study participants interviewed reported being very satisfied with confidentiality, health worker attitude, interpersonal communication, counselling, and availability of drugs. The major sources of dissatisfaction included overcrowding, long waiting time and inadequate/expensive laboratory services. Suggestions proffered for improving the quality of care at the centres included increasing staff strength at the treatment centres, improving the quality and cost of laboratory services, and infrastructure upgrade. This study demonstrates the role health workers and facility processes play in satisfaction with services at HIV treatment centres. Health workers, programme officers, and managers in HIV prevention, care and treatment need to pay attention to these issues if they would be successful in improving the quality of care for PLHIVs.
    • Invisible work: Child work in households with a person living with HIV/AIDS in Central Uganda

      Julie Abimanyi-Ochom; Brett Inder; Bruce Hollingsworth; Paula Lorgelly (Taylor & Francis Group, 2017-01-01)
      Background: HIV/AIDS has led to increased mortality and morbidity, negatively impacting adult labour especially in HIV/AIDS burdened Sub-Saharan Africa. There has been some exploration of the effects of HIV/AIDS on paid child labour, but little empirical work on children’s non-paid child work. This paper provides quantitative evidence of how child and household-level factors affect children’s involvement in both domestic and family farm work for households with a person living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) compared to non-PLWHA households using the 2010/2011 Centre for Health Economics Uganda HIV questionnaire Survey. Method: Descriptive analysis and multivariate logistic modelling is used to explore child and household-level factors that affect children’s work participation. Results: This research reveals greater demands on the labour of children in PLWHA households in terms of family farm work especially for boys. Results highlight the expected gendered social responsibilities within the household space, with girls and boys engaged more in domestic and family farm work, respectively. Girls shared a greater proportion of household financial burden by working more hours in paid work outside the household than boys. Lastly, the study revealed that a household head’s occupation increases children’s participation in farm work but had a partial compensatory effect on their involvement in domestic work. Wealth and socio-economic standing is no guarantee to reducing child work. Conclusion: Children from PLWHA households are more vulnerable to child work in family farm work especially boys; and girls are burdened beyond the household space through paid work. Differing perspectives and solutions need to consider the contextual nature of child work.
    • Is HIV/AIDS a consequence or divine judgment? Implications for faith-based social services. A Nigerian faith-based university’s study

      Olaore, IB; Olaore, AY (Taylor & Francis, 2014-10-08)
      A contemporary reading of Romans 1:27 was disguised as a saying by Paul Benjamin, AD 58 and administered to 275 randomly selected members of a private Christian university community in south western Nigeria in West  Africa. Participants were asked to respond to a two-item questionnaire on their perception of the cause of  HIV/AIDS either as a judgment from God or consequence of individual lifestyle choices. The apparent consensus  drifted in the direction of God as the culprit handing down his judgment to perpetrators of evil who engage in the  homosexual lifestyle. The goal of this paper was to examine the implications of a judgmental stance on  addressing the psychosocial needs of Persons Living with HIV/AIDS in religious environments. It also explores  how service providers in faith-based environments can work around the Judgment versus Consequence tussle in providing non-discriminatory services to persons diagnosed with HIV/AIDS.Keywords: HIV/AIDS, Christian, university, consequence, judgmentUne interpre´tation moderne de Romains 1:27 a e´te´ de´guise´e en adage par Paul Benjamin (58 Apr. J.-C.) et administre´e de fac¸on ale´atoire a` 275 membres de la communaute´ d’une universite´ chre´tienne prive´e au  sud-ouest du Nige´ria, en Afrique de l’Ouest. Il e´tait demande´ aux participants de re´pondre a` un questionnaire  a` deux points concernant leur perception sur la cause du VIH/ SIDA, qui est soit un jugement de Dieu, ou une  conse´quence des choix du mode de vie d’un individu. Le consensus s’est clairement penche´ du coˆte´ de Dieu,  accuse´ d’exe´cuter son jugement envers les auteurs du mal qui se livrent a` un style de vie homosexuel. L’objectif  de cet article est d’examiner les implications d’une position critique en re´pondant aux besoins psychologiques des  personnes porteuses du VIH/SIDA en milieux religieux. Il explore aussi comment les prestataires de services dans  des environnements d’organisations religieuses peuvent contourner la dispute entre Jugement et Conse´quence en pourvoyant des services non discriminatoires aux individus diagnostique´s avec le VIH/SIDA.Mots cle´s: VIH/SIDA, Chre´tienne, universite´, conse´quence, jugement
    • Islam and AIDS: Between Scorn, Pity and Justice

      Esack, F; Chiddy, S (Taylor & Francis, 2011-07-07)
      No Abstract.
    • ‘It’s not good to eat a candy in a wrapper’: male students’ perspectives on condom use and concurrent sexual partnerships in the eastern Democratic Republic of Congo

      Mulumeoderhwa, Maroyi (SAHARA-J: Journal of Social Aspects of HIV/AIDS, 2018-09-27)
      This paper reports on fieldwork carried out in 2011 with aim to investigate young men’s perspectives about condoms use, concurrent sexual partnerships and sex in the context of HIV/AIDS. This study employed a qualitative approach to collect data from 28 boys aged 16–20 from two urban and two rural high schools in South Kivu province. Four focus group discussions and 20 individual interviews were conducted among them. The findings showed that most students identified condoms as unsafe and untrustworthy. Reasons given for the mistrust of condoms were related to the belief that condoms do not give enough protection from Sexually Transmitted Infections, HIV and pregnancies. Most participants believe that condoms have a ‘small hole’ or are unreliable and are therefore not effective in prevention. They also mentioned that condoms encourage inappropriate sexual activity. They prefer flesh-to-flesh sex rather than protected sex using a condom. However, a few participants acknowledged the importance of condom use. Despite the risk of HIV transmission, boys believe that it is appropriate for them to have concurrent sexual partnerships. They justified the concurrent sexual partnerships as a way of ensuring that they cannot miss a girl to satisfy their sexual desire. Given the boys’ failure to use condoms and their strong inclination to concurrent sexual partnerships, there is a need for heath groups and stakeholders within the area to increase awareness about condoms’ effectiveness and improve knowledge dissemination on Sexually Transmitted Diseases and how they are prevented.Keywords: Condoms; concurrent sexual partnerships; girlfriend; young men; HIV/AIDS
    • ‘It’s not good to eat a candy in a wrapper’: male students’ perspectives on condom use and concurrent sexual partnerships in the eastern Democratic Republic of Congo

      Maroyi Mulumeoderhwa (Taylor & Francis Group, 2018-01-01)
      This paper reports on fieldwork carried out in 2011 with aim to investigate young men’s perspectives about condoms use, concurrent sexual partnerships and sex in the context of HIV/AIDS. This study employed a qualitative approach to collect data from 28 boys aged 16–20 from two urban and two rural high schools in South Kivu province. Four focus group discussions and 20 individual interviews were conducted among them. The findings showed that most students identified condoms as unsafe and untrustworthy. Reasons given for the mistrust of condoms were related to the belief that condoms do not give enough protection from Sexually Transmitted Infections, HIV and pregnancies. Most participants believe that condoms have a ‘small hole’ or are unreliable and are therefore not effective in prevention. They also mentioned that condoms encourage inappropriate sexual activity. They prefer flesh-to-flesh sex rather than protected sex using a condom. However, a few participants acknowledged the importance of condom use. Despite the risk of HIV transmission, boys believe that it is appropriate for them to have concurrent sexual partnerships. They justified the concurrent sexual partnerships as a way of ensuring that they cannot miss a girl to satisfy their sexual desire. Given the boys’ failure to use condoms and their strong inclination to concurrent sexual partnerships, there is a need for heath groups and stakeholders within the area to increase awareness about condoms’ effectiveness and improve knowledge dissemination on Sexually Transmitted Diseases and how they are prevented.
    • Knowledge about HIV/AIDS and policy knowledge in a South African state hospital

      Allard Dijkstra; Evelyn Kangawaza; Caroline Martens; Henk Boer; Johannes J. Rasker (Taylor & Francis Group, 2007-08-01)