Itens para a visualização no momento 1-20 of 448

    • The Catholic Context in Bonhoeffer's Lifetime

      Dietrich, Donald J. (Center for Christian-Jewish Learning at Boston College, 2011-04-15)
      Delivered during a panel discussion entitled "Bonhoeffer's Context: The Churches' Responses to Nazism" during the conference Dietrich Bonhoeffer for Our Times: Jewish and Christian Perspectives, cosponsored by the Center for Christian-Jewish Learning at Boston College, the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, Hebrew College, and Andover-Newton Theological School, September 17, 2006. The essay discusses the lack of resistance by the Catholic Church in general and, with some exceptions, by Catholic theologians in particular.
    • Joseph Telushkin. A Code of Jewish Ethics. Volume 1: You Shall be Holy

      Keenan, S.J., James F. (Center for Christian-Jewish Learning at Boston College, 2011-04-15)
      No abstract is available.
    • Dietrich Bonhoeffer and the Evangelical Moment in American Public Life

      Gushee, David P. (Center for Christian-Jewish Learning at Boston College, 2011-04-15)
      This essay was delivered during a panel discussion entitled "'Costly Discipleship and Contemporary Culture: Bonhoeffer as a Model for Religious Activism" during the conference Dietrich Bonhoeffer for Our Times: Jewish and Christian Perspectives, cosponsored by the Center for Christian-Jewish Learning at Boston College, the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, Hebrew College, and Andover-Newton Theological School, September 18, 2006. The author argues that conservative American evangelicals "often conflate loyalty to Jesus Christ with loyalty to the United States of America. They weave together loyalty to Jesus Christ with loyalty to the president, the party, the troops, the flag, or the nation." For the author, the witness of Dietrich Bonhoeffer encourages a strong resistance to such a confusion of loyalties.
    • "With Sincere Reverence": A Christological Perspective for the Interreligious Dialogue Envisioned by Nostra Aetate

      Gamberini, SJ, Paolo (Center for Christian-Jewish Learning at Boston College, 2011-04-15)
      Theologians have a particular task to provide discernment when expressing in interreligious dialogue the Christological proclamation that Jesus Christ is "'the way, the truth, and the life,' (Jn 14:6), in whom people may find the fullness of religious life, in whom God has reconciled all things to Himself" (Nostra Aetate, §3). Therefore, there is a need to renew the spirit of the Conciliar Declaration Nostra Aetate,, which reminds us that the Catholic Church rejects nothing that is true and holy in the other religions. The Church acknowledges with sincere reverence ("sincera cum observantia") that the other often religions reflect a ray of that Truth which enlightens all people. In this article, I highlight three different moments in which this sincere reverence towards other religions may be realized. The first moment may be called methodological and refers to the Ignatian tradition of the Spiritual Exercises. I develop first of all the praesupponendum (presupposition) as an attitude of being able to listen to the religious experience of the other; then the contemplatio ad amorem (contemplation in attaining love), as awareness and recognition of the action of the Spirit: being able to distinguish the religious experience of God from its theoretical and practical interpretations; finally the magis, the continuing transcending of the religious conscience in reaching out God: Deus semper maior (God is always greater). The second moment of my paper is more theoretical. I deal with the question of Truth within the interreligious dialogue and how God’s ineffable transcendence and otherness have been revealed in this Jesus of Nazareth; "No one has seen God at any time; the only begotten God who is in the bosom of the Father, He has explained Him" (Jn 1:18). The humanity of God, Jesus’ particularity, is not a limitation for interreligious dialogue, but constitutes an adequate perspective for determining the universality of Jesus Christ. The third moment considers the practical dimension of the dialogue. I relate the inner otherness of God (Trinity) with God’s becoming other than himself (Incarnation), showing how the evangelical praxis of the believer, who makes himself everything for everybody, is able in the praxis, more than in theory, to sustain the eschatological tension between the already and not yet that is characteric of interreligious dialogue.
    • Do We Share a Book? The Sunday Lectionary and Jewish-Christian Relations

      Peppard, Michael (Center for Christian-Jewish Learning at Boston College, 2011-04-15)
      This paper analyzes the role that the Sunday Lectionary, revised after Vatican II, plays in the Catholic Church’s presentation of Jews and Judaism. The presentation of Jews and Judaism in the current Lectionary is clearly a vast improvement over what preceded it. However, there is still much work to be done in order to bring the Lectionary in line with official Catholic teachings on the Old Testament and the Jews. The recent document of the Pontifical Biblical Commission, The Jewish People and Their Sacred Scriptures in the Christian Bible (2001), provides a new and authoritative impetus to reconsider the selection of Old Testament texts and their relationship to Gospel texts in the Lectionary. The article argues that continued Lectionary reform â specifically with regard to the Old Testament lections â would improve Jewish-Christian relations in the long term.
    • What Can a Catholic Learn from the History of Jewish Biblical Exegesis?

      Anderson, Gary A (Center for Christian-Jewish Learning at Boston College, 2011-04-15)
      This article considers the claim of the 2001 Pontifical Biblical Commission Study, The Jewish People and Their Sacred Scriptures in the Christian Bible that the Christian reader can be instructed by post-biblical Jewish reflections on the Bible. It explores Jewish understandings that the role of the biblical prophets was not only to communicate God's messages to Israel but also to represent Israel before God. The essay demonstrates the correctness of the PBC's assertion by applying this Jewish tradition about the prpohets to Christian reflection on the meaning of Jesus' death.
    • Can Catholicism Validate Jewish Biblical Interpretation?

      Levenson, Jon D. (Center for Christian-Jewish Learning at Boston College, 2011-04-15)
      This article analyses the Pontifical Biblical Commission's 2001 study, The Jewish People and Their Sacred Scriptures in the Christian Bible and its significance for Christian-Jewish relations. While praising the study for addressing a large and complex issue, the essay raises some questions about particularity and relativism, elements of supersessionism, and inter-textuality.
    • The Church Struggle and the Confessing Church: An Introduction to Bonhoeffer's Context

      Hockenos, Matthew D. (Center for Christian-Jewish Learning at Boston College, 2011-04-15)
      This article traces the German church struggle form 1933 to 1945 with particular emphasis on Dietrich Bonhoeffer’s role. Although Bonhoeffer’s status in the world today is that of a great theologian and courageous opponent of the Nazi regime, he did not have much of an impact on the direction of the Confessing Church during the church struggle. Bonhoeffer’s striking albeit marginal role in the German church struggle and his inability to affect significantly the direction of the Confessing Church was due to many factors, including his young age, his liberal-democratic politics, his absence from Germany from October 1933 to April 1935, his vacillating and at times contradictory positions on central issues, his radical theological critique of the Nazi state, his friendship with and family ties to Christians of Jewish descent, and ultimately his willingness to risk his life to destroy Hitler’s regime.
    • Moral Formation as Transformation: The Contribution of Dietrich Bonhoeffer

      Pope, Stephen J. (Center for Christian-Jewish Learning at Boston College, 2011-04-15)
      This essay was delivered during a panel discussion entitled "The Formation of the Religious Conscience after the Shoah: Bonhoeffer’s Spirituality for Today " during the conference Dietrich Bonhoeffer for Our Times: Jewish and Christian Perspectives, cosponsored by the Center for Christian-Jewish Learning at Boston College, the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, Hebrew College, and Andover-Newton Theological School, September 17, 2006. The author argues that Bonhoeffer can help us understand moral formation as personal and social transformation.
    • Pluralism Out Of The Sources Of Judaism: Religious Pluralism Without Relativism

      Jospe, Raphael (Center for Christian-Jewish Learning at Boston College, 2011-04-15)
      Jewish theology is compatible with religious pluralism, based on the paradigm of the Jewish obligation to live in accordance with the commandments of the Torah while accepting the legitimacy of other ways of life in accordance with the paradigm of the universal “seven commandments of the children of Noah.” Jospe here answers two challenges to this thesis, one, voiced by Christian theologians, that pluralism equals relativism, and a second, voiced by the Jewish scholar, Menachem Kellner, that there are no sources for pluralism in Jewish tradition and that pluralism itself makes no sense. In presenting his arguments, Jospe invokes a wide range of ancient, medieval and modern thinkers, probing the theological possibilities for pluralism within Jewish tradition and its boundaries with relativism. In doing so, he argues that one should differentiate between moral relativism, a non-negotiable category, and epistemological relativism, where there is room for compromise.
    • Dietrich Bonhoeffer’s Relevance for Post-Holocaust Christian Theology

      Barnett, Victoria J. (Center for Christian-Jewish Learning at Boston College, 2011-04-15)
      The Protestant theologian and resistance figure Dietrich Bonhoeffer is often portrayed as a hero of the Holocaust, particularly in popular films and literature. Much of the academic literature also assumes a clear relationship between his concern for the Jewish victims of Nazism, his theology, and his participation in the German resistance. A counter-narrative exists, however, which focuses on the anti-Judaism in his writings and contends that a heroic portrait of Bonhoeffer is simplistic and that Bonhoeffer’s significance for post-Holocaust thought is tenuous at best. A key problem here is the volume and complexity of the relevant historical and theological material. The thesis of this essay is that only an in-depth understanding of his theology as a dialogue with the historical complexities of his times can offer insights into his potential contribution to post-Holocaust thought. This essay will review the most salient theological and historical points, focusing on two often overlooked topics: 1) his actual role not only in the German resistance but in the larger ecumenical resistance network that helped Jews across Europe and 2) his own very concrete reflections on guilt, leading to his conviction of the necessity for a different self-understanding among Christians â and a different kind of Christianity â in a post-Nazi world. His experience under Nazism and in the resistance led to a radical reformulation of Christian identity that may be relevant for post-Holocaust theology.
    • Bonhoeffer, the Jewish People and Post-Holocaust Theology: Eight Perspectives; Eight Theses

      Haynes, Stephen R. (Center for Christian-Jewish Learning at Boston College, 2011-04-15)
      Over the years since his death, dozens of interpreters - scholars, novelists, dramatists, filmmakers and devotional writers- have offered a variety of perspectives on Bonhoeffer’s relationship to the Jewish people. This article describes eight distinct, though overlapping and largely compatible, perspectives on this question. It then identifies the author’s own view of this important relationship by presenting and developing eight theses. The author concludes that the desire to portray Bonhoeffer as a guide for post-Holocaust theological reflection is based less in Bonhoeffer’s theological achievements than in the compelling nature of his witness and the dire need for Christian heroes from the Nazi era.
    • Repositioning The “Holy Remnant” of Israel: German Jewish Negotiations with Christian Culture on the Eve of the Holocaust

      Krell, Marc A. (Center for Christian-Jewish Learning at Boston College, 2011-04-15)
      By maintaining the spiritual centrality of Israel as God’s “holy remnant,” Dietrich Bonhoeffer, unwittingly perhaps, entered into negotiations with Jewish thinkers over their continued theological and cultural relevance to German society. This paper focuses on the Jewish side of these negotiations by examining the work of three Jewish thinkers who helped shape them, Franz Rosenzweig, Hans Joachim Schoeps and Martin Buber. Despite their divergence from one another, the theological approaches of Rosenzweig, Schoeps and Buber represent a common attempt to map out the course of twentieth-century Jewish identity construction based on a shared, but at times unacknowledged engagement with Christian thought and culture. Their writings constitute a mutual opposition to the perceived failure of their forbearers in the Wissenschaft des Judentums to balance Jewish particularity and universalism, while at the same time reflecting a desire for varying degrees of mutual coexistence with their Christian contemporaries. Ultimately the work of Rosenzweig, Schoeps and Buber confirmed Bonhoeffer’s portrayal of the continuing validity of Jewish existence in relation to God during the Holocaust, while at the same time providing models for a later, dialogical mapping of Jewish identities vis à vis Christianity in an increasingly multicultural, post-Holocaust world.
    • Emancipation from the Whirlwind: Piety and Rebellion among Jewish-American Post-Holocaust and Christian Liberation Readings of Job

      Tollerton, David C (Center for Christian-Jewish Learning at Boston College, 2011-04-15)
      This article focuses upon the manner in which the Book of Job’s dissonant messages of theological radicalism and conservatism have been utilised within discussion of two specific episodes of innocent suffering in the modern world – the murder of six million Jews during the Holocaust and the suffering of the oppressed in the developing world. Overlaying the discussion, the following model is proposed: that, firstly, Christian liberation theologians emphasise the more theologically conservative messages that can be drawn from Job while asserting radical political opposition to those who possess power. Conversely, Jewish Holocaust theologians empathise with Job’s more theologically radical elements, yet do so within outlooks committed to conservatively maintaining the security and power of the state of Israel after two thousand years of Jewish powerlessness. This model is tested by focusing upon seven treatments of Job associated with liberation or Holocaust theologies. It is concluded that, although there are significant complications, in broad terms the model largely holds ” offering a comparative insight into contextual Christian and Jewish interpretations of the Bible in which political radicalism and theological radicalism are found to be at odds with one another.
    • After 40 Years, Nostra Aetate's Christological Implications

      Henrix, Hans Hermann (Center for Christian-Jewish Learning at Boston College, 2011-04-15)
      In reflecting on the Christological statements in Nostra Aetate, §4 and on their implications, both the strongest link between Christians and Jews and their deepest difference have become apparent to Christian theology. The essential Christian conviction that the crucified and risen Jesus Christ is the Messiah and beyond that the Incarnate Son of God is not only denied by Jews, but is incomprehensible for them. Jewish objections have caused Christian theology to ask whether it is possible for it to say something positive as regards Jewish hope in the Messiah, a hope which also says “no” to Christians’ faith in Christ. The Pontifical Biblical Commission picked up on this question in a positive way in its text of the year 2001, The Jewish People and Their Sacred Scriptures in the Christian Bible. In addition, Jewish criticism of the Christian idea of the Incarnation, not least in discussions of shituf ("association"), has brought a new awareness of the importance for Christian-Jewish dialogue of the teaching of the Council of Chalcedon on the preservation of the character of each nature unified in Christ.
    • Anti-Judaism in Marcion and his Opponents

      Tyson, Joseph B. (Center for Christian-Jewish Learning at Boston College, 2011-04-15)
      Although Marcion is usually thought of as the arch-antisemite of the early church, this paper argues that his opponents were no less anti-Jewish than he. The proto-orthodox victory over Marcionite Christianity meant that the Hebrew Scriptures would continue to be a major part of the Christian canon and that Christians and might be encouraged to view the story of Jesus and their own faith as part of the history of ancient Israel. Marcion, by contrast, did not regard the Hebrew Scriptures as part of the Christian canon but nevertheless judged them to be accurate historical records that should be interpreted literally. In their rejection of Marcion, the proto-orthodox leaders also rejected a literal interpretation of the Hebrew Scriptures and sought to find an underlying unity between them and the Christian story. Despite the high status attributed to these Scriptures, Marcion’s opponents employed a variety of non-literal methods of interpretation, which generally carried with them a high degree of anti-Judaism. These tendencies may be observed both in the Acts of the Apostles, which is to be dated about 120 C.E., and Justin’s Dialogue with Trypho (c. 160 C.E.).
    • Branches of that Good Olive Tree: 21st Century Liturgical Challenges and Possibilities

      Doetzel, Audrey (Center for Christian-Jewish Learning at Boston College, 2011-04-15)
      As indicated in the title, the article’s starting point is the dual affirmation in Nostra Aetate, §4 that the Church “draws its sustenance from the root of that good olive tree,” and that its mystery involves “the spiritual bond” linking it “with Abraham’s stock.” Noting the Church’s commendable liturgical efforts of the past post-Nostra Aetate decades, it observes that the “density” of the present time calls for a more comprehensive approach in the Church’s 21st century liturgical renewal efforts. Due to the rapid and complex confluence of religious, political, intellectual and cultural movements marking the present time, courageous and creative efforts are necessary for the Church’s liturgical response to retain its efficacy and authenticity. The goal of this two-part article is to encourage liturgical conversations that will help foster creative developments in a responsible manner over the next post-Nostra Aetate decade. To enable a more comprehensive overview of recent developments in liturgical theology and liturgical history, Part One briefly explores today’s richly pluriform action of liturgy, and shows the effects, at significant historical moments, of ensuring or neglecting both continuity and change in the Church’s liturgical expressions. After identifying four events or movements contributing to the density of the present historical moment, it proceeds, in Part Two, to outline a three-point focus for 21st century liturgical transformation. This then serves as the lens directing an exploration of new liturgical possibilities relating to the Liturgical Year and the Advent-Christmas cycle.
    • Abraham Heschel and the Catholic Heart

      O'Hare, Padraic (Center for Christian-Jewish Learning at Boston College, 2011-04-15)
      This essay associates the deep abiding influence of Rabbi Heschel on Christians with his unique expression of an incarnational religious imagination, appealing to all Christians with a “Catholic heart.” In this view, the opposing worldview to dualism, life is experienced sacramentally, God is experienced immanently and religious symbols are experienced as deeply efficacious. The essay focuses especially on the incarnational trait of associating mystical experience and contemplative prayer with prophetic action and reveals how this link is nurtured and cultivated by Heschel and by his friend, Thomas Merton.
    • Christian Prayer and Song in a Post-Holocaust Church

      Anderson, E. Byron (Center for Christian-Jewish Learning at Boston College, 2011-04-15)
      Because liturgy also is ritual and rite through which patterns of linguistic, homiletic, musical, and embodied practices are repeated over time and by which Christian persons are formed, we must pay close attention to the subtle ways in which the “liturgy of supersessionism” persists in our churches. To this end, this article explores questions about the Christian use of the Tetragrammaton in prayer and song; the distinction, or lack thereof, between Sabbath and Sunday; the relationship between the dating of Easter and Passover; and the ways in which Christian prayer and song portray the relationship between Israel and the Church.
    • Kenneth Stow. Jewish Dogs: An Image and Its Interpreters: Continuity in the Catholic-Jewish Encounter

      Joslyn-Siemiatkoski, Daniel (Center for Christian-Jewish Learning at Boston College, 2011-04-15)
      No abstract is available.