• Implications of Paul's Hopes for the End of Days for Jews and Christians Today: A Critical Re-evaluation of the Evidence

      Cunningham, Philip A.; Nanos, Mark D. (Center for Christian-Jewish Learning at Boston College, 2014-11-05)
      In the past decade or so, Paul’s ideas about the eschaton as expressed in Romans 11 have been invoked in a lively discussion about why the Catholic Church today does not organize campaigns to convert Jews to Christianity. Particularly important have been his words about “the full number of the Gentiles.” This essay asks if Paul’s letters require, or support as most appropriate today, a triumphal Christian expectation that at the end of days Jews will inevitably admit that they had been wrong all along in saying “no” to the Christian proclamation of the Gospel. It suggests that a crucial factor is whether Christian readings of Romans 11 today—as well as typical translations of Romans 11—are predicated on a view of Paul as an apostate who departed from Judaism. It argues that current actualizations of Pauline eschatology are quite different if Paul is instead understood as an apostle to the nations from within Judaism. It concludes that present-day eschatological scenarios need to have greater complexity than simplistic zero-sum phrases like “a Jewish turn to Christ” or “Christians will see their error,” and that Paul himself—in a very different religious world—tried to resist such binary thinking when it came to Jews and non-Jews.
    • In Our Time: Civil Rights, Women’s Liberation, and Jewish-Christian Dialogue Fifty Years After Nostra Aetate

      Von Kellenbach, Katharina (Center for Christian-Jewish Learning at Boston College, 2016-03-16)
      No abstract is available.
    • In Search of an Explanation for the Suffering of the Jews: Johann Reuchlin's Open Letter of 1505

      Posset, Franz (Center for Christian-Jewish Learning at Boston College, 2011-04-21)
      In 1505, the humanist Johann Reuchlin (1455-1522) published a booklet titled Doctor iohanns Reuchlins tütsch missiue, warumb die Juden so lang im ellend sind (Johann Reuchlin’s German-language open letter [discussing] why the Jews have been in “exile” so long). One may debate whether or not Reuchlin’s “German open letter” is to be understood as merely repeating the “conventional view that they [the Jews] were suffering for the sins of their forefathers who had mur-dered Jesus.” However, such an interpretation is a far too simplified summary of this rather unusual, “somewhat mysteri-ous tract.” Reuchlin felt sincere concern over the continued suffering of the Jews and sought to understand it for many years.
    • Inclusive Quarantine: The Pathology and Performance of Jewish Existence in the Erlangen Opinion on the Aryan Paragraph

      Tafilowski, Ryan (Center for Christian-Jewish Learning at Boston College, 2016-01-13)
      The Erlangen Opinion on the Aryan Paragraph, co-authored by Lutheran theologians Paul Althaus and Werner Elert, has proven controversial. Scholars have typically interpreted the document’s recommendation regarding the place of Jewish Christians in the church according to an inclusion/exclusion binary model. However, the Erlangen Opinion actually reflects a dialectical theology of Jewish existence that Althaus had developed during the Weimar years. Following this dialectic of pathology and performance, Althaus envisions neither the total inclusion nor total inclusion of Jews in the German state church. Rather, he proposes an inclusive quarantine of Jewish persons, who represent both a mortal danger to and indispensable factor for all communities—both societal and ecclesial. By probing the logic of this important artifact of Protestant theology’s complicated relationship to National Socialist ideology, the article sheds light on the ambivalent nature of Christian anti-Judaism and antisemitism.
    • Interfaith Dialogue and the Golden Age of Christian-Jewish Relations

      Ariel, Yaakov (Center for Christian-Jewish Learning at Boston College, 2011-04-28)
      Since the 1960s, remarkable changes have taken place in the relationship between the Christian and Jewish communities in the West. A movement of interfaith dialogue stood at the center of the developments, serving as a catalyst that helped to bring about reconciliation and improvement in the attitudes of Christians towards Jews. Beginning in the English-speaking world at the turn of the twentieth century, the dialogue between Jews and non-Jews gained more ground in the decades between the two world wars. The movement of interfaith reconciliation advanced considerably in the years after World War II and reached a "golden age" in the late 1960s and 1970s, when an unprecedented momentum for reconciliation and dialogue between the faiths flourished in Europe, America, Israel, and other countries. Despite occasional set-backs and while involving mostly members of liberal or mainstream groups, this movement helped to improve the relationship between Christians and Jews in an unprecedented manner and on a worldwide scale.
    • Introduction of A Time for Recommitment: Building the New Relationship between Christians and Jews

      Cunningham, Philip A. (Center for Christian-Jewish Learning at Boston College, 2011-04-21)
      A founding officer and secretary-treasurer of The Council of Centers on Christian-Jewish Relations, Dr. Philip A. Cunningham, addressed the assembly at the July 2009 Berlin ICCJ conference before the ceremony at which representatives from twenty-three countries signed the 'A Time for Recommitment' document.
    • Introduction to Golden Age Conference Proceedings

      Ray, Jonathan; Elukin, Jonathan (Center for Christian-Jewish Learning at Boston College, 2011-04-28)
      No abstract is available.
    • Introduction: What Happened in 1965?

      Suomala, Karla (Center for Christian-Jewish Learning at Boston College, 2016-03-16)
      No abstract is available.
    • Irven M. Resnick. Marks of Distinction: Christian Perceptions of Jews in the High Middle Ages

      Kanarfogel, Ephraim (Center for Christian-Jewish Learning at Boston College, 2013-09-04)
      No abstract is available.
    • Irving Greenberg. For the Sake of Heaven and Earth: The New Encounter between Judaism and Christianity

      Sandmel, David Fox (Center for Christian-Jewish Learning at Boston College, 2011-04-15)
      No abstract is available.
    • Isaac C. Rottenberg. Christian-Jewish Dialogue: Exploring Our Commonalities and Our Differences

      Eckardt, Alice L. (Center for Christian-Jewish Learning at Boston College, 2011-04-15)
      No abstract is available.
    • Isabella Sandwell. Religious Identity in Late Antiquity: Greeks, Jews, and Christians in Antioch

      Tonias, Demetrios (Center for Christian-Jewish Learning at Boston College, 2011-04-21)
      No abstract is available.
    • Jackie Feldman. A Jewish Guide in the Holy Land: How Christian Pilgrims Made Me Israeli

      Weissman, Deborah (Center for Christian-Jewish Learning at Boston College, 2016-11-22)
      No abstract is available.
    • Jacques Kornberg. The Pope’s Dilemma: Pius XII Faces Atrocities and Genocide in the Second World War

      Kertzer, David I. (Center for Christian-Jewish Learning at Boston College, 2016-08-01)
      No abstract is available.
    • Jacques Maritain and the Jewish Question: Theology, Identity and Politics

      Ventresca, Robert A. (Center for Christian-Jewish Learning at Boston College, 2011-04-15)
      This article calls for a reconsideration of Jacques Maritain’s philosophical and theological reflections on the ‘Jewish Question’, on anti-Semitism and, more broadly, on Jewish-Christian relations in modern history. The article follows two broad lines of enquiry. First, it sketches a general outline of Maritain’s arguments against Catholic-Christian anti-Semitism, and his proposals for workable solutions to what he identified as the ‘Jewish problem’ in European life. Second, the article considers the practical value of Maritain’s visions of a ‘new Christendom’, that is, of a new political regime based on Gospel-values and thus recognizing the complete civic equality, political and religious freedoms of European Jews. The article concludes that all of Maritain’s thought on the Jewish question must be read through the lens of his Christian eschatological view.
    • James Bernauer and Robert A. Maryks, Eds. “The Tragic Couple”: Encounters between Jews and Jesuits

      Ruff, Mark Edward (Center for Christian-Jewish Learning at Boston College, 2016-11-21)
      No abstract is available.
    • James Bernauer. Jesuit Kaddish: Jesuits, Jews, and Holocaust Remembrance

      Cucchiara, Martina (Center for Christian-Jewish Learning at Boston College, 2021-04-05)
      No abstract is available.
    • James H. Charlesworth, Ed. Jesus and Temple: Textual and Archaeological Explorations

      Calaway, Jared C. (Center for Christian-Jewish Learning at Boston College, 2016-05-04)
      No abstract is available.
    • James K, Aitken and Edward Kessler, eds. Challenges in Jewish-Christian Relations

      Tonias, Demetrios (Center for Christian-Jewish Learning at Boston College, 2011-04-15)
      No abstract is available.
    • James Rudin. Christians & Jews, Faith to Faith: Tragic History, Promising Present, Fragile Future

      Fisher, Eugene J. (Center for Christian-Jewish Learning at Boston College, 2011-11-02)
      No abstract is available.