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dc.contributor.authorChai Chang, Peter Thiam
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-25T10:30:32Z
dc.date.available2019-09-25T10:30:32Z
dc.date.created2016-01-19 21:57
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12424/233102
dc.description.abstract"This comparative philosophy-religious studies based article begins by examining a related phenomenon, the Chinese relatively liberal stance on suicide. I plan to expound the cultural forces that shaped traditional China's interpretation of life, death, and particularly motifs validating self-sacrifice. To elucidate the Chinese perspectives my study will incorporate extensive comparison with the Christian viewpoints. The paper then addresses the “self-regarding” euthanasia cases where death is advanced as measures to relieve personal affliction. The Confucians, I explain, may approve of assisted suicide to halt terminal suffering. They would nevertheless object to its use as a way out from the broadly construed “loss of dignity” brought on by infirmity. Following this are explications of the “other-regarding” category, where euthanasia is invoked as an altruistic act to benefit the collective. At the outset, the Confucians would reprove the termination of life as means to allay the burden of care, especially if it impinges upon the poor. I then argue that given China’s beleaguered public-health system there may be moral justification for some to waive their entitlement to life-prolonging treatment as measures to curb excesses. This essay ends by contending that accelerating death, even when constricted to these exceptional instances, is not the favored recourse. This is because the root causes of the current predicaments stem from Beijing's failure to administer equitable care. Instead of pursuing the legitimization of euthanasia, the stronger ethical response is to reform China's healthcare system with enhanced resources"
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherCenter for Biomedical Ethics (CBmE) National University of Singapore
dc.rightsCreative Commons Copyright (CC 2.5)
dc.subjectother regarding
dc.subjectself-regarding
dc.subjecthealthcare systems
dc.subjectConfucian model
dc.subjectEuthanasia
dc.subjectChina
dc.subjectBioethics
dc.subject.otherCultural ethics
dc.subject.otherMethods of ethics
dc.subject.otherBioethics
dc.subject.otherCommunity ethics
dc.titleThe Euthanasia Debate in China
dc.typeArticle
dc.source.journaltitleAsian Bioethics Review
dc.source.volume7
dc.source.issue1
dc.source.beginpage43–61
dcterms.accessRightsopen access
refterms.dateFOA2019-09-25T10:30:32Z
ge.collectioncodeAA
ge.dataimportlabelGlobethics object
ge.identifier.legacyglobethics:6240776
ge.identifier.permalinkhttps://www.globethics.net/gel/6240776
ge.journalyear2015
ge.lastmodificationdate2019-02-11 15:55
ge.lastmodificationuseradmin@novalogix.ch
ge.submissions1
ge.peerreviewedyes
ge.setnameGlobeEthicsLib
ge.setnameGlobeTheoLib
ge.setspecglobeethicslib
ge.setspecglobetheolib
ge.submitter.emailjsmartinezg2@gmail.com
ge.submitter.nameMartinez, Jhon
ge.submitter.userid13344334
ge.subtitleArguments from the Traditional Chinese Moral Perspective
ge.linkhttps://www.asianbioethicsreview.com/journal/index.php?journal=abr_sbc1&page=article&op=view&path%5B%5D=353


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