Zwingliana : Beiträge zur Geschichte Zwinglis, der Reformation und des Protestantismus in der Schweiz publishes articles on the history of Protestantism in Switzerland and its influence. Zwingliana: Beiträge zur Geschichte des Protestantismus in der Schweiz und seiner Ausstrahlung was founded in 1897 as a academic journal and at the same time a journal for the members of the Zwingli Society (Zwingliverein). The journal is sponsored by the Zwingliverein in conjunction with the Swiss Reformation Studies Institute at the University of Zurich. Zwingliana provides free electronic access to its issues with a three year delay.

News

The Globethics.net library contains articles of Zwingliana as of vol. 1(1897) to current (3 years embargo).

Recent Submissions

  • Samuel Lutz, Ulrich Zwinglis Spiritualität, 2018

    Kunz, Ralph (Theologischer Verlag Zürich, 2020-11-23)
    No abstract available.
  • Daniël Timmerman, Heinrich Bullinger on Prophecy and the Prophetic Office (1523–1538), 2015

    Csukás, Gergely (Theologischer Verlag Zürich, 2020-11-23)
    No abstract available.
  • 123. Jahresbericht des Zwinglivereins über das Jahr 2019

    N., N. (Theologischer Verlag Zürich, 2020-11-23)
    No abstract available.
  • Heinrich Bullinger: Briefe von Oktober bis Dezember 1546, 2017

    Burnett, Amy Nelson (Theologischer Verlag Zürich, 2020-11-23)
    No abstract available.
  • Heinrich Bullinger als Kartäuser? Bullinger als Schüler und Lehrer

    Micus, Rosa (Theologischer Verlag Zürich, 2020-11-23)
    The Presider ("Antistes") of the Church of Zurich, Heinrich Bullinger (1531–1575) is considered as accomplished early. Having returned from his formation on the Lower Rhine at the age of 18, he had already turned to the Reformation, after having considered during his studies at Cologne to enter the eremitic order of the Charterhouse. This order was represented with notable houses in Cologne and Bâˆle, and thus notes about the last carthusian at Baˆ le, Thomas Kreß (Kreszi) are transmitted to Bullinger as late as 1545. In Emmerich, Bullinger enjoyed a humanistic education in Latin, which he passed on at a school of Latin instituted specifically for him in the monastery of Kappel in 1523. He held classes in continuous reading of the Bible, as should be the practice at the "Prophezey" instituted 1525 in Zurich, and read the Church Fathers. – Notable in this context is also the abolition of organs in the churches of Zurich from 1524 on for about 80 years; the Carthusians do not know organs in their churches to this day.
  • Heinrich Bullinger: Briefe von Januar bis März 1547, 2019

    Burnett, Amy Nelson (Theologischer Verlag Zürich, 2020-11-23)
    No abstract available.
  • 122. Jahresbericht des Zwinglivereins über das Jahr 2018

    N., N. (Theologischer Verlag Zürich, 2020-11-23)
    No abstract available.
  • Titelblatt, Impressum, Inhalt

    N., N. (Theologischer Verlag Zürich, 2020-11-23)
    No abstract available.
  • "Imprime´e de diffe´rentes manie`res": The Gallican Confession and its First Printed Editions (1559?–1561)

    Braghi, Gianmarco (Theologischer Verlag Zürich, 2020-11-23)
    This paper analyses the first printed editions of the Gallican Confession (agreed upon at the synod of Paris in May 1559) and formulates a hypothesis on the context in which they were published and disseminated. Analysis is based on abridged editions of the Confession in Latin and in French, printed in Geneva and Strasbourg, and featuring a preface authored by pastor Antoine de Chandieu. Although the ministers assembled in Paris in 1559 promulgated a confession in 40 articles, only 35 articles were included in these editions (which are dated 1559, but were ostensibly printed in the first half of 1560). These editions in 35 articles were abridged versions of the ‘full’ Gallican Confession, and this abridgment responded to polemical purposes and political expediency connected to the failure of the conspiracy of Amboise. This paper also offers some remarks upon the decision to abandon these 35-articles editions in 1561, probably with a view to the calling of the e´tats de Pontoise and the colloquy of Poissy.
  • 121. Jahresbericht des Zwinglivereins über das Jahr 2017

    N., N. (Theologischer Verlag Zürich, 2020-11-23)
    No abstract available.
  • Personenregister

    N., N. (Theologischer Verlag Zürich, 2020-11-23)
    No abstract available.
  • Ökumenisches Tauwetter zwischen Zürich und Einsiedeln: Freundschaftliche Beziehungen zwischen Einsiedler Mönchen und Zürcher Theologen im ausgehenden 18. Jahrhundert

    Fässler, Thomas (Theologischer Verlag Zürich, 2020-11-23)
    In the second half of the 18th century, a close friendship developed between some Catholic Benedictine monks of Einsiedeln Abbey and Protestant Zurich theologians, which resulted in a fruitful exchange of their views on questions of faith. The Enlightenment’s emphasis on tolerance not only made them lay aside any denominational quarrels and prejudices but also made them wish to reunite the two churches as their ultimate goal. Other reasons for these contacts, reflected in a lively correspondence, were as follows: curiosity, an intellectual interest in the theological positions of the opposing views as well as a desire to use the opportunity to express their own convictions without any polemics. Likewise, they saw the need to counteract anti-revelation and anti-ecclesiastical movements generated by the tenets of the Enlightenment. They realized that as a united body they would be much more powerful, and this may have led both sides to this rapprochement. In all of this, however, the monks were firmly convinced that they were on the side of the truth. Therefore, they were careful not to deviate from the Roman path of salvation while building friendships with some Protestants. For the monks, a reunion of the churches was only conceivable if and when the Reformed theologians returned to the bosom of the Catholic Church under the primacy of the Pope. In the course of history, as from 1789, the monks cancelled their recently formed ties with the Protestants, mainly because of the monks’ rejection of the anti-ecclesiastical forces of the Enlightenment and the French Revolution, which again was directed against everything non-Catholic. With the rise of Ultramontanism in the 19th century, they deliberately set out to forget these relationships. After a few decades, the remarkable ecumenical relaxation was replaced by cooler mutual relations.
  • Prädestination und Providenz: Eine Spurensuche im frühen Zürcher Pietismus

    Kaspar, Bütikofer (Theologischer Verlag Zürich, 2020-11-23)
    Double predestination, the dazzling concept of Calvinism, had tightened over time to become an orthodox dogma, stipulated by the Reformed Church of Zurich. The early Zurich pietists inevitably came into conflict with predestination as it proved to be incompatible with new, influential ideas from mysticism and spiritualism. They replaced it by "special providence". This rejection of strong theological determinism brought about a change in the history of mind and was a building block of Enlightenment. From the middle of the 18th century, double predestination was left to oblivion.
  • Matthias Neugebauer, Ulrich Zwinglis Ethik. Stationen – Grundlagen – Konkretionen, 2017

    Engeler, Judith (Theologischer Verlag Zürich, 2020-11-23)
    No abstract available.
  • Dem Schwarzen Tod singend die Stirn bieten: Die bislang übersehene poetische Ader des Berner Dekans Johann Haller (1523–1575). Mit einem editorischen Anhang

    Schiendorfer, Max (Theologischer Verlag Zürich, 2020-11-23)
    In the historical reconstruction of early modern conditions, different kinds of sources such as chronicles, diaries, letters or various archival documents have always been considered to be standard fare. But more inconspicuous testimonies such as keyword-like calendar notes recorded for personal use or literary documents such as song texts, on the other hand, have usually received less attention. This article shows that the evaluation of such supposedly less relevant source material can lead to interesting new insights as well. With the example of three songs from the years 1563 to 1568, signed with the initials J. H. and kept as unique specimens in three different libraries, it is shown that they can be attributed to the well-known Bernese dean Johann Haller (1523–1575). As the publication dates already suggest, these songs are to be set against the historical background of the Black Death which struck all of Europe between 1563 and 1566. Obviously, the Bernese dean, who also had fallen ill with the plague and had been struggling with death for weeks, tried to poetically overcome his personal calamity with these songs. In the world of research, his traumatic near-death experience has not yet received the attention it deserves. For the first time now, Haller’s remarkable literary talent can be appreciated.
  • Portrait of Bullinger's Theology

    Joe, Mock (Theologischer Verlag Zürich, 2020-11-23)
    The Bible verses in Hans Asper’s portrait of Heinrich Bullinger reveal a summary of his understanding of redemptive history and the message of the Bible as a whole. In particular, there is focus on Bullinger’s christology, viz. the deity and humanity of Christ in the context of the three persons of the economic Trinity working in unison. The elect are in Christ and, thereby, receive all the covenant promises and blessings of God.

View more