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dc.contributor.authorPielecka-Fortuna, Justyna
dc.contributor.authorKalogeraki, Evgenia
dc.contributor.authorGreifzu, Franziska
dc.contributor.authorLöwel, Siegrid
dc.date.accessioned2019-10-28T16:24:57Z
dc.date.available2019-10-28T16:24:57Z
dc.date.created2018-09-05 00:40
dc.date.issued2015-09-14
dc.identifieroai:pubmedcentral.nih.gov:4569386
dc.identifier/pmc/articles/PMC4569386/
dc.identifier/pubmed/26368569
dc.identifierhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0137961
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12424/2473790
dc.description.abstractIt was previously shown that a small lesion in the primary somatosensory cortex (S1) prevented both cortical plasticity and sensory learning in the adult mouse visual system: While 3-month-old control mice continued to show ocular dominance (OD) plasticity in their primary visual cortex (V1) after monocular deprivation (MD), age-matched mice with a small photothrombotically induced (PT) stroke lesion in S1, positioned at least 1 mm anterior to the anterior border of V1, no longer expressed OD-plasticity. In addition, in the S1-lesioned mice, neither the experience-dependent increase of the spatial frequency threshold (“visual acuity”) nor of the contrast threshold (“contrast sensitivity”) of the optomotor reflex through the open eye was present. To assess whether these plasticity impairments can also occur if a lesion is placed more distant from V1, we tested the effect of a PT-lesion in the secondary motor cortex (M2). We observed that mice with a small M2-lesion restricted to the superficial cortical layers no longer expressed an OD-shift towards the open eye after 7 days of MD in V1 of the lesioned hemisphere. Consistent with previous findings about the consequences of an S1-lesion, OD-plasticity in V1 of the nonlesioned hemisphere of the M2-lesioned mice was still present. In addition, the experience-dependent improvements of both visual acuity and contrast sensitivity of the open eye were severely reduced. In contrast, sham-lesioned mice displayed both an OD-shift and improvements of visual capabilities of their open eye. To summarize, our data indicate that even a very small lesion restricted to the superficial cortical layers and more than 3mm anterior to the anterior border of V1 compromised V1-plasticity and impaired learning-induced visual improvements in adult mice. Thus both plasticity phenomena cannot only depend on modality-specific and local nerve cell networks but are clearly influenced by long-range interactions even from distant brain regions.
dc.languageen
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherPublic Library of Science
dc.rightshttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectResearch Article
dc.titleA Small Motor Cortex Lesion Abolished Ocular Dominance Plasticity in the Adult Mouse Primary Visual Cortex and Impaired Experience-Dependent Visual Improvements
dc.typeText
ge.collectioncodeOAIDATA
ge.dataimportlabelOAI metadata object
ge.identifier.legacyglobethics:15121817
ge.identifier.permalinkhttps://www.globethics.net/gel/15121817
ge.lastmodificationdate2018-09-05 00:40
ge.lastmodificationuseradmin@pointsoftware.ch (import)
ge.submissions0
ge.oai.exportid149801
ge.oai.repositoryid1570
ge.oai.setnamePLoS ONE
ge.oai.setnamePMC full-text journals
ge.oai.setspecplosone
ge.oai.setspecpmc-open
ge.oai.streamid2
ge.setnameGlobeEthicsLib
ge.setspecglobeethicslib
ge.linkhttps://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0137961


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