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dc.contributor.authorTanasha Taylor
dc.contributor.authorShana Smith
dc.date.accessioned2019-10-29T00:47:37Z
dc.date.available2019-10-29T00:47:37Z
dc.date.created2018-09-05 01:04
dc.date.issued2010-01-01
dc.identifieroai:intechopen.com:6759
dc.identifierhttp://www.intechopen.com/articles/show/title/a-virtual-harp-for-therapy-in-an-augmented-reality-environment
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12424/2542383
dc.description.abstractThe use of the virtual harp therapy system had an impact on the participants in the program, most were very excited when they first arrived. While almost all of the participants have received some form of traditional therapy training, most have never experienced virtual or augmented reality before and were therefore, able to look at the therapy training that they have seen before in a different way. Part of the problem with traditional therapy training exercises is that patients get bored or fatigued with the repetitive activity and lose motivation to continue with the training exercises. This augmented reality based therapy system allows participants not only to experience a new type of technology with a hands-on therapy exercise, but also to be motivated to continue exercising through playing the virtual harp. During the observational testing, users playing performance did increase as they continued plucking the harp strings. They would start the test searching for the strings with long periods of pauses between notes gradually being able to shorten the period of pauses or strumming the harp. Participants were able to follow the virtual therapist feature with little error from selecting the wrong string. There were social interactions from the users such as asking questions, emotional expressions, and non-verbal communication while playing the harp. Most of the participants stated that they enjoyed the experience; however, there were a few complaints that seemed to come up often. The primary two of these were the haptic device cursor sinking through the harp and the flashing background making it hard to see our harp. The model we used was very detailed and producing realistic vibrations with the haptics in the augmented scene is a memory intensive operation so at times the program can be slow. Haptics was used over optical finger tracking to reduce the challenge of trying to find the correct string in the air; since haptics provides force feedback and could have the benefit of muscle resistance exercises. Other glove haptic devices could be used to provide a more realistic plucking action but this device was used to minimize cost and system complexity in order to be used at various therapy facilities. Another common complaint was the headset was too heavy and big, making it hard to keep in place. Based on the results for the level of difficulty in using the virtual harp, the users felt it was difficult using the system. Some of the users’ comments mentioned that this will take awhile to get used to, but there could be good skills learned and that it was more interesting than traditional therapy because playing the harp gives an immediate reward for trying. One reason may have been the equipment was new to them and since the users had to hold up the head mounted display on their head the accuracy of tracking the marker did have an affect on the playing difficulty. Another comment mentioned with improvement the system would be versatile for use in therapy like hand/eye coordination. Measuring improvement and learned skills is one of the greatest challenges of a training program. In the survey the participants were asked to rate how much they improved and learned during the experience. Even though the study lasted about thirty minutes for one session, users expressed they experienced some improvement in their range of motion but really noticed improvement in their skills. While this is not a concrete measure of skills and improvement acquired since repetitive sessions are needed, it suggests that participants at least felt that they had gained a great deal of information utilizing our program. Despite these issues, most participants indicated that the VR training as their favorite method of therapy training. Most participants thought the system was entertaining and desired to continue playing the harp after the testing session. In addition, users would recommend this
dc.languageen
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherInTech
dc.relation.ispartofISBN:978-953-7619-69-5
dc.subjectAugmented Reality
dc.titleA Virtual Harp for Therapy in an Augmented Reality Environment
dc.type04
ge.collectioncodeOAIDATA
ge.dataimportlabelOAI metadata object
ge.identifier.legacyglobethics:15194196
ge.identifier.permalinkhttps://www.globethics.net/gel/15194196
ge.lastmodificationdate2018-09-05 01:04
ge.lastmodificationuseradmin@pointsoftware.ch (import)
ge.submissions0
ge.oai.exportid149801
ge.oai.repositoryid5767
ge.oai.streamid2
ge.setnameGlobeEthicsLib
ge.setspecglobeethicslib
ge.linkhttp://www.intechopen.com/articles/show/title/a-virtual-harp-for-therapy-in-an-augmented-reality-environment
ge.linkhttp://www.intechopen.com/download/pdf/pdfs_id/6759


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