Now showing items 1378-1397 of 12181

    • Código de Deontología Médica

      Colegio de Médicos del Estado Lara (COLEGIO DE MÉDICOS DEL ESTADO LARA, 1996)
    • Código de Deontología Médica y Ley de ejercicio de la medicina

      Colegio de Médicos del Estado Lara (COLEGIO DE MÉDICOS DEL ESTADO LARA, 13-07-2005)
    • C.M.A. Code of Ethics

      Harrison, C P (2016-01-06)
    • C.M.A. Code of Ethics

      Harrison, Colin P.
    • California Dental Association: Code of Ethics

      California Dental Association, 2016-01-08
    • Cameroon 1999/2002 : code of conduct for NGOs and churches

      Stückelberger, Christoph, 1951- (Globethics.net, 2010)
      Corruption is a universal phenomenon that knows no boundary, no race and no religion. Corruption, which developed in Cameroon over the past two decades, has become the cancer of the Cameroonian society, and is eating into the fabric of every society stratum. Conscious of the hope the population has placed in them, and of their roles and responsibilities in society, NGOs and the churches of Cameroon intend to fight against corruption and to promote transparency. NGOs, churches, and church projects sincerely hope that other sectors of society (state and private sector) would join in their efforts and take concrete measures with regard to this fight.
    • Campus Code of conduct

      Cornell University (Cornell university, 2012-06-08)
      "Conduct of the members of the Cornell community is an appropriate area of concern for the University. This statement sets forth several basic principles and important policies regarding the scope, manner, and standards of regulating that conduct. This Title is necessarily general. Its purpose is to inform the Cornell community of the general principles and policies upon which the Cornell judicial system operates, and to give general guidance to the judicial system as it handles specific cases arising under regulations authorized by the Board of Trustees, including legislation adopted by the University Assembly (or its successor) and approved by the President as representative of the Board."
    • Can a Code of Ethics Improve Manager Behavior and Investor Confidence? An Experimental Study

      Davidson, Bruce I.; Stevens, Douglas E. (ScholarWorks @ Georgia State University, 2013-01-01)
      Policy makers and corporations have recently emphasized a code of ethics as an effective aspect of corporate governance. The corporate governance literature in accounting, however, provides little empirical or theoretical support for this emphasis. We address this gap between public policy and the literature by studying the effectiveness of a code of ethics in an experimental setting. Using Bicchieri's (2006) model of social norm activation, we predict that a code of ethics will improve manager return behavior and investor confidence to the extent that it activates social norms that control opportunistic behavior. Further, we predict that adding a certification choice whereby the manager can publicly certify that he will adhere to the code will enhance the potential for the code of ethics to activate such norms. We find that a code of ethics only improves manager return behavior and investor confidence when the code incorporates a public certification choice by the manager. When the code is present but there is no certification choice, manager return behavior does not improve and investor confidence erodes over time because of increased expectations that are not met by managers. An analysis of individual return decisions and exit questionnaire responses supports the activation of social norms as the underlying mechanism behind our results.
    • Can a Code of Ethics Reduce Sabotage and Increase Productivity under Tournament-Based Compensation? An Experimental Study

      Smith, Stuart (ScholarWorks @ Georgia State University, 2016-12-15)
      Managers have often used tournament incentive programs because of their ability to attract top talent and motivate employees to give their best effort (Grote 2005; McGregor 2006; Ng and Lublin 2010). However, because a tournament incentive structure explicitly evokes competition, prior economic literature has shown that the harmful effects of sabotage observed during a tournament can completely negate any benefits they have (Carpenter et al. 2010). The remedies suggested to reduce sabotage involve reducing the economic incentives that contribute to both beneficial and harmful behavior (Chen 2003). In the accounting literature to date, no remedy for the harmful effects of a tournament incentive has been investigated because the ability to sabotage has been restricted by way of tight experimental control. I utilize an experiment in which participants perform a real effort task which allows them to sabotage each other and receive relative performance feedback in real-time. I first predict that sabotage during a tournament will be higher than fixed pay because of the higher incentive to sabotage during a tournament. I then predict that by employing a code of ethics, I can activate the social norm of promise keeping which discourages those in a tournament from engaging in sabotage, while still giving their best effort. In the majority of cases, this allows the company to reap the previously observed benefits of a tournament incentive, while minimizing the previously observed costs that normally accompany a tournament incentive. However, I unexpectedly discover that a code of ethics can be able double-edge sword; In so much that, if violations persist despite certifications to follow the code, participants may become more discouraged and their behavior more detrimentally effects productivity than if those same violations occurred without a code. The implications of employing a code of ethics under these two incentive systems on overall productivity is explored.
    • Can be the Code of Ethics an Important Piece of the Big Picture Companies’ Puzzle?

      Valentin Calinovici; Antonio Sandu; Tomita CIULEI
      The aim of this paper is to analyze the relevance of a Ethical Code for the efficiency and healthy developement of a business company. I know that a lot of work is required for this code to be fulfilled and a lot of studies reveal that companies need the percept and the values stated by ethics codes in order to have a healthy development. But if it does not comply with the code of ethics, what happens? These are not such laws in order to be able to suffer the consequences immediately, but are just recommendations for better development. Can a company grow in the absence of an ethical code? A company's activity is a compendium of factors that work to fulfill its purpose or in a related way. A component factor in this compendium is also ethics, transposed by the company's code of ethics. It is true that a company is a very complex compendium of factors that interact in order to generate the purpose of its being. But a theoretical point of view, like those stated in a ethical code,can be really helpful? In 1985 – 2001, Enron Company was one of the most innovative and appreciated company in the USA. However, this company has developed all these years only with few influences by its ethical code. Enron began to violate ethical values much more 5 years before bankruptcy. For five years, the company did not feel that breaking these values, the company's overall status is on a negative trend. Certain management mistakes have led the firm to bankruptcy, but if it can be considered a cause of bankruptcy failure to observe the code of ethics, why has it been so many years that these consequences take effect?
    • Can codes of conduct help rebuild trust in the UK Financial Services Industry?

      Riley, Neil (2012)
      This MBA project is a company hosted management project. This work has been commissioned by the Question of Trust Campaign. This recently-launched campaign aims to improve the levels of trust within the UK financial services industry. The campaign approach involves concern over ‘soft controls’ within the industry, related to ethics and values. The position of the campaign is that too much emphasis has been placed upon ‘hard controls’ such as regulation; ‘compliance’ is not necessarily the same as ‘doing the right thing’. The remit of this project is to investigate and assess codes of conduct, and to discuss the potential role that codes of conduct may play in increasing levels of trust within the UK financial services industry. Recent banking scandals affecting the industry have highlighted the salience and importance of this topic. A picture has emerged whereby lack of trust has led to a lack of engagement of consumers with the industry. This in turn creates a societal problem given that many consumers do not adequately invest in pension plans or other forms of financial life-stage planning. The Question of Trust campaign board commissioned this report in order to investigate whether academic theory could assist the campaign in achieving its objective to rebuild trust in the industry. A significant element of this project has involved creating an in-depth academic literature review on the subject of codes of conduct. Findings from this literature review were summarised though creation of a campaign ‘policy report’ on the subject of whether codes of conduct can help rebuild trust in the UK financial services industry. Furthermore, specific recommendations have been provided for the Question of Trust campaign based on research findings. In terms of methodology, this project can be seen as a form of ‘action research’. Whilst the project aims to deliver a practical client solution, client reaction and feedback is also recorded as results of the project activity. In this way, reaction of a small number of business leaders is recorded as a means of evaluating practitioner views on academic theory. This project document argues that codes of conduct can help rebuild trust in the UK financial services industry. Academic theory on the topic does however illustrate inherent difficulties and challenges. Codes of conduct are seen as the most important element within a wider programme of business ethics management. The project policy report offers practical recommendations as a means of summarising and applying academic theory on the topic. This project document recommends the Question of Trust campaign create infrastructure to assist companies in developing their own codes of conduct, and further recommends that the campaign play a role in developing ethical training programmes to further support the UK financial services industry.
    • Can codes of conduct help rebuild trust in the UK Financial Services Industry?

      Riley, Neil (2012)
      This MBA project is a company hosted management project. This work has been commissioned by the Question of Trust Campaign. This recently-launched campaign aims to improve the levels of trust within the UK financial services industry. The campaign approach involves concern over ‘soft controls’ within the industry, related to ethics and values. The position of the campaign is that too much emphasis has been placed upon ‘hard controls’ such as regulation; ‘compliance’ is not necessarily the same as ‘doing the right thing’. The remit of this project is to investigate and assess codes of conduct, and to discuss the potential role that codes of conduct may play in increasing levels of trust within the UK financial services industry. Recent banking scandals affecting the industry have highlighted the salience and importance of this topic. A picture has emerged whereby lack of trust has led to a lack of engagement of consumers with the industry. This in turn creates a societal problem given that many consumers do not adequately invest in pension plans or other forms of financial life-stage planning. The Question of Trust campaign board commissioned this report in order to investigate whether academic theory could assist the campaign in achieving its objective to rebuild trust in the industry. A significant element of this project has involved creating an in-depth academic literature review on the subject of codes of conduct. Findings from this literature review were summarised though creation of a campaign ‘policy report’ on the subject of whether codes of conduct can help rebuild trust in the UK financial services industry. Furthermore, specific recommendations have been provided for the Question of Trust campaign based on research findings. In terms of methodology, this project can be seen as a form of ‘action research’. Whilst the project aims to deliver a practical client solution, client reaction and feedback is also recorded as results of the project activity. In this way, reaction of a small number of business leaders is recorded as a means of evaluating practitioner views on academic theory. This project document argues that codes of conduct can help rebuild trust in the UK financial services industry. Academic theory on the topic does however illustrate inherent difficulties and challenges. Codes of conduct are seen as the most important element within a wider programme of business ethics management. The project policy report offers practical recommendations as a means of summarising and applying academic theory on the topic. This project document recommends the Question of Trust campaign create infrastructure to assist companies in developing their own codes of conduct, and further recommends that the campaign play a role in developing ethical training programmes to further support the UK financial services industry.
    • Can codes of ethics really produce consistent behaviour?

      Farrell, BJ; Cobbin, DM; Farrell, HM (MCB UP, 2009-12-21)
    • Can Corporate Codes of Ethics Influence Behavior?

      Cleek, Margaret Anne; Leonard, Sherry Lynn (2016-01-08)
    • Can deontological principles be unified? Reflections on the mere means principle

      Bruers, StijnUGent00010108450880200146756497706847244831C151BC-F0EE-11E1-A9DE-61C894A0A6B4 (2016)
      The mere means principle says it is impermissible to treat someone as merely a means to someone else’s ends. I specify this principle with two conditions: a victim is used as merely a means if the victim does not want the treatment by the agent and the agent wants the presence of the victim’s body. This principle is a specification of the doctrine of double effect which is compatible with moral intuitions and with a restricted kind of libertarianism. An extension of this mere means principle, where not only using but also considering someone as merely a means is immoral, can explain and unify other deontological principles: doing versus allowing, partiality in imperfect duties of beneficence, and the asymmetry of procreational duties. A loop trolley dilemma is often presented as a counterexample of the mere means principle, but I argue that this dilemma generates a moral illusion, comparable to perceptual illusions.
    • Can Deontologists Be Moderate?

      Smilansky, Saul
      There is a widespread view according to which deontology can be construed as a flexible, reasonable view, able to incorporate consequentialist considerations when it seems compelling to do so. According to this view, deontologists can be moderate, and their presentation as die-hard fanatics, even if true to some historical figures, is basically a slanderous and misleading philosophical straw man. I argue that deontologists, properly understood, are not moderate. In the way deontology is typically understood, a deontology, as such, conceptually needs to be overriding. The error I point out has pernicious implications, which are noted.