Now showing items 8389-8408 of 12047

    • Pactos emocionais: reflexões em torno da moral, da ética e da deontologia

      Douglas Borges Candido (Universidade Federal do Recôncavo da Bahia, 2019-06-01)
    • Padrões de Desempenho sobre Sustentabilidade Socioambiental [Performance Standards on Environmental and Social Sustainability]

      International Finance Corporation (IFC) (2012-01-01)
      "A Estrutura de Sustentabilidade da IFC articula o compromisso estratégico da Corporação com o desenvolvimento sustentável e é parte integrante da abordagem da IFC à gestão de risco." ["IFC’s Sustainability Framework articulates the Corporation’s strategic commitment to sustainable development, and is an integral part of IFC’s approach to risk management."]
    • Padrões de Excelência para a Formação e o Treinamento em Administração Pública

      United Nations
      " A intenção desse esforço conjunto é desenvolver padrões objetivos relacionados à natureza da excelência em administração pública e treinamento nesta área. Espera-se que tais padrões permitam que as instituições se auto-avaliem, e, assim, determinem os recursos necessários à obtenção da excelência. Este último ponto deve ser aqui enfatizado: a intenção é que os padrões aqui propostos sejam utilizados para a auto-avaliação num processo de aprendizado, e não como um medidor para o “julgamento” de programas ou instituições. Na mesma publicação, Blue Wooldridge propôs um conjunto de características das escolas e instituições de administração mais eficazes, utilizando essas características como uma base para desenvolver critérios pelos quais seria possível avaliar a excelência da formação e do treinamento em administração pública."
    • Paläographische Grundlagen der Datierung des Kölner Mani-Kodex

      Poljakov, Fedor Borisovič (1959-); Fonkič, Boris Lʹvovič (1938-) (1990)
    • Panelist: Faith & Professional Ethics

      McMorrow, Judith A. (SelectedWorks, 2014-03-03)
    • Paper ethics : in-house codes of ethics and conduct for Australian newspapers

      Varley, Carolyn (Queensland University of Technology, 1995)
    • Paper ethics : in-house codes of ethics and conduct for Australian newspapers

      Varley, Carolyn (Queensland University of Technology, 1995)
    • Paper: : What do European veterinary codes of conduct actually say and mean? A case study approach

      Magalhães-Sant'Ana, M.; More, S. J.; Morton, D.B.; Osborne, M.; Hanlon, A. J. (DIALNET OAI Articles, 2015)
      Codes of Professional Conduct (CPCs) are pivotal instruments of self-regulation, providing the standards to which veterinarians should, and sometimes must, comply. Despite their importance to the training and guidance of veterinary professionals, research is lacking on the scope and emphasis of the requirements set out in veterinary CPCs. This paper provides the first systematic investigation of veterinary CPCs. It relies on a case study approach, combining content and thematic analyses of five purposively selected European CPCs: Federation of Veterinarians of Europe (FVE), Denmark, Ireland, Portugal and the UK. Eight overarching themes were identified, including ‘definitions and framing concepts’, ‘duties to animals’, ‘duties to clients’, ‘duties to other professionals’, ‘duties to competent authorities’, ‘duties to society’, ‘professionalism’ and ‘practice-related issues’. Some differences were observed, which may be indicative of different approaches to the regulation of the veterinary profession in Europe (which is reflected in having a ‘code of ethics’ or a ‘code of conduct’), cultural differences on the status of animals in society, and regulatory bodies’ proactivity in adapting to professional needs and to societal changes regarding the status of animals. These findings will contribute to an improved understanding of the roles of CPCs in regulating the veterinary profession in Europe.
    • Paper: : What do European veterinary codes of conduct actually say and mean? A case study approach

      Magalhães-Sant'Ana, M.; More, S. J.; Morton, D.B.; Osborne, M.; Hanlon, A. J. (2015)
      Codes of Professional Conduct (CPCs) are pivotal instruments of self-regulation, providing the standards to which veterinarians should, and sometimes must, comply. Despite their importance to the training and guidance of veterinary professionals, research is lacking on the scope and emphasis of the requirements set out in veterinary CPCs. This paper provides the first systematic investigation of veterinary CPCs. It relies on a case study approach, combining content and thematic analyses of five purposively selected European CPCs: Federation of Veterinarians of Europe (FVE), Denmark, Ireland, Portugal and the UK. Eight overarching themes were identified, including ‘definitions and framing concepts’, ‘duties to animals’, ‘duties to clients’, ‘duties to other professionals’, ‘duties to competent authorities’, ‘duties to society’, ‘professionalism’ and ‘practice-related issues’. Some differences were observed, which may be indicative of different approaches to the regulation of the veterinary profession in Europe (which is reflected in having a ‘code of ethics’ or a ‘code of conduct’), cultural differences on the status of animals in society, and regulatory bodies’ proactivity in adapting to professional needs and to societal changes regarding the status of animals. These findings will contribute to an improved understanding of the roles of CPCs in regulating the veterinary profession in Europe.
    • Parliamentarians and the New Code of Ethics

      Franks, C.E.S. (Commonwealth Parliamentary Association, Canadian Region, 2005)
    • Parliamentary codes of conduct do not end political corruption, but they can help build a democratic political culture

      Dávid-Barrett, Elizabeth (London School of Economics and Political Science, 2015-08-05)
      Since Lord Nolan drafted his principles of public life, codes of conduct have become a key tool for parliaments around Europe seeking to build or repair their reputations. New research by Elizabeth Dávid-Barrett suggests that, although codes do not necessarily prevent corruption, the process of writing them helps to build a democratic culture and attract high-calibre individuals into public life.
    • Partage des données d'enquêtes en recherche qualitative : approche juridique, éthique, déontologique et épistémologique

      Cités, Territoires, Environnement et Sociétés ( CITERES ) ; Université de Tours-Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique ( CNRS ); CITERES; Huyghe , Marie; Cailly , Laurent; Oppenchaim , Nicolas (HAL CCSD, 2018-05)
    • “Partecipazione agli utili” - Commento all’art. 2432 del Codice Civile

      N. Abriani; Onesti, Tiziano; Romano, Mauro; Taliento, Marco (UTET, 2016)
    • Partisipasi Kaum Muda dalam Pembangunan

      Desky, Harjoni (Pascasarjana UIN Sunan Kalijaga, 2016)
      8. This study aims firstly to know the participation of youth in the village of Banda Sakti subdistrict Hagu Teungoh Lhokseumawe, secondly, to determine the factors supporting and hindering the participation of the youth in the village. This research uses a descriptive qualitative approach. While the sources of the data in this study are informants selected through purposive sampling and snowball sampling. The main informants in this study are: village chief, kasi development, the head of the aisle, community leaders, and youth. Data were collected through interviews, observation and documentation. The results showed that the optimal participation of youth not yet occurred. In addition, the factors that support the youth actually are at their behavior. Meanwhile, the participation is confronted with obstacles and constraints, namely: internal and external. The internal constraints such as the dependence of young people on the government side, they are still limited knowledge about the role in the development and availability of time, while the external constraints faced were the lack of dissemination of relevant parties regarding the development activities to be carried out in the neighborhood.
    • Partners in Time?

      Murphy, David F.; Bendell, Jem (UNRISD, 1999-08)
      "Historically, most relationships between the private sector and civil society have been founded upon conflict. In different sectors and geographical contexts, this pattern of business-NGO relations has recently started to change with the emergence of formal sustainable development partnerships between these long-standing adversaries. Part 1 of this paper offers a global overview of the changing nature of business-NGO relations on sustainable development. It examines why and how such relations are changing in the 1990s, the current spectrum of business-NGO relations and how the strategic responses of business and NGOs to sustainable development have evolved. In order to illustrate how business-NGO relations in both the North and South are developing in practice, three case studies are presented on protest and partnership initiatives in the forest products, oil and sporting goods industries respectively. The case study of the tropical timber trade highlights the myriad relations between civil society and business and the very different corporate responses to civil society and consumer pressures. It is suggested that these varied responses are partly explained by the fact that certain companies and individuals within senior management have taken a leadership role and have recognized both the ethical, commercial or competitive value of corporate environmental responsibility. The analysis of Shell s experience in Nigeria reveals the impact which co-ordinated global protest can have on corporate activities. This case suggests that enhanced dialogue and partnership may not be enough to improve the global image of the oil industry. The big oil companies confront serious limits in their ability to change fundamentally the environmentally damaging nature of their business and, in general, have failed to recognize the need for energy alternatives. The case study of the attempt to eliminate the use of child labour in the manufacture of soccer balls in Pakistan outlines the politics and processes of complex multi-stakeholder North-South partnerships to promote corporate social responsibility. An important lesson from this case is the fundamental importance of corporate transparency and a willingness to accept independent monitoring. The study reveals the tensions inherent in such projects. Serious questions remain concerning the future of children whose employment is affected, the effects of such projects on exports, and the sustainability and replicability of complex multi-stakeholder projects. The case studies are followed by a review of various typologies of business-NGO relations in the literature on conflict and partnership. None, it is argued, explains adequately the diversity of such relations and their implications for governance and global social change. Part 1 concludes with preliminary thoughts on the preconditions, interactive processes and outcomes of more collaborative relations between business and NGOs."(pg v)