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dc.contributor.authorAfari-Gyan, K
dc.date.accessioned2019-11-04T12:07:49Z
dc.date.available2019-11-04T12:07:49Z
dc.date.created2018-12-15 00:34
dc.date.issued2018-11-27
dc.identifieroai:ojs.ajol.info:article/180118
dc.identifierhttps://www.ajol.info/index.php/contjas/article/view/180118
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12424/3223261
dc.description.abstractFrom 1945 Kwame Nkrumah (1909-1972) developed close relations first with George Padmore (1902-1959), a Trinidadian, and then with Dr. W.E.B. Du Bois (1868- 1963), an African-American who became a Ghanaian citizen soon before he died. As men of thought and action, they exerted great influence on the affairs of their day; and, through their writings, they continue to exert considerable influence on contemporary thinking in the black world. They all lie buried in Ghana. This essay seeks to explore the basis of their relationship.* Originally published in Research Review, Vol 7, Nos. 1 & 2, 1991
dc.languageen
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherInstitute of African Studies, University of Ghana
dc.rights© Institute of African Studies, University of Ghana, 2013
dc.sourceContemporary Journal of African Studies; Vol 5, No 2 (2018); 87-97
dc.subjectKwame Nkrumah, George Padmore, W. E. B. DuBois, Pan-Africanism
dc.titleKwame Nkrumah, George Padmore and W.E.B. Du Bois
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/article
ge.collectioncodeOAIDATA
ge.dataimportlabelOAI metadata object
ge.identifier.legacyglobethics:16023120
ge.identifier.permalinkhttps://www.globethics.net/gel/16023120
ge.lastmodificationdate2018-12-15 00:34
ge.lastmodificationuseradmin@pointsoftware.ch (import)
ge.submissions0
ge.oai.exportid149250
ge.oai.repositoryid224
ge.oai.setnameArticles
ge.oai.setspeccontjas:ART
ge.oai.streamid2
ge.setnameGlobeEthicsLib
ge.setspecglobeethicslib
ge.linkhttps://www.ajol.info/index.php/contjas/article/view/180118


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