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dc.contributor.authorRedmond, Jennifer
dc.date.accessioned2019-11-05T05:20:28Z
dc.date.available2019-11-05T05:20:28Z
dc.date.created2016-02-13 21:39
dc.date.issued2008
dc.identifieroai:eprints.maynoothuniversity.ie:4804
dc.identifierhttp://eprints.maynoothuniversity.ie/4804/1/JR_sinful.pdf
dc.identifierRedmond, Jennifer (2008) ‘Sinful Singleness’? Exploring the Discourses on Irish Single Women’s Emigration to England, 1922–1948. Women's History Review, 17 (3). pp. 455-476. ISSN 0961-2025
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12424/3642221
dc.description.abstractIn the interwar and immediate post-war years, the persistently high rates of emigration by
 young, single Irish women gave rise to worries over their moral and spiritual welfare. This
 was partly because of their assumed extreme vulnerability as women coming from rural loca-
 tions to the metropolises of England. It seems that the combination of their singleness and
 their gender was the prime reason for the concern evinced predominantly by the Roman
 Catholic Church, but also by lay organisations and the Irish governments. Multiple sources
 of danger for girls were perceived from their journey ‘across the water’ to their places of
 employment, from which they were in need of help and protection, if not prohibition. The
 majority of pronouncements on the topic were negative towards women, but no equivalent
 amount of concern was given to male migrants often of similar age and background and who
 also migrated as single persons. Thus, singleness was a gendered ‘problem’. Whilst studies
 of Irish female emigrants have focused on their experiences of being immigrants and their
 identity as white women who are in Bronwen Walter’s words ‘outsiders inside’, less attention
 has been paid to ways in which their single status became a marker of concern over morals
 and behaviour. Indeed, it is argued here that this was the particular reason why such moral-
 istic discourses existed. This article seeks to explore some of the complexities of the public and
 private voices engaged in the debates over whether single female emigration could be equated
 with sinful behaviour and the gendered implications of migrants’ marital status.
dc.format.mediumtext
dc.languageen
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherTaylor & Francis (Routledge)
dc.relation.ispartofhttp://eprints.maynoothuniversity.ie/4804/
dc.relation.ispartof10.1080/09612020801924597
dc.subjectHistory
dc.title‘Sinful Singleness’? Exploring the
 Discourses on Irish Single Women’s
 Emigration to England, 1922–1948
dc.typeArticle
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ge.identifier.legacyglobethics:6338398
ge.identifier.permalinkhttps://www.globethics.net/gel/6338398
ge.lastmodificationdate2016-03-21 11:49
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ge.oai.exportid148650
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ge.oai.setnameStatus = Published
ge.oai.setnameAcademic Unit = Faculty of Arts,Celtic Studies and Philosophy: History
ge.oai.setnameType = Article
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ge.linkhttp://eprints.maynoothuniversity.ie/4804/1/JR_sinful.pdf


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