• 'Necessity knows no law': the resurrection of Kriegsraison through the US targeted killing programme

      Connolly, Catherine (Oxford University Press, 2017-12-17)
      The doctrine of Kriegsraison, and its argument that ‘necessity knows no law’, is generally considered to have been laid to rest with the creation of the 1949 Geneva Conventions. However, this article asserts that Kriegsraison is resurrected and wholly alive in the USAs’ targeted killing programme. The targeted killing programme, now in existence for more than 15 years, remains one of the most problematic aspects of US anti-terror policy and continues to raise numerous legal questions. The article argues that treatment of the various legal frameworks relevant to targeted killing by the USA is suffused with Kriegsraison to such an extent that necessity, in its varying iterations, has become the primary guiding principle for US uses of force, and assessments as to their legality. This argument is predicated on an examination of the USAs’ expansive interpretation of jus ad bellum principles, its a-la-carte approach in recognising the applicability of jus in bello rules, and the designation of regions in which it uses force as lying ‘outside the area of active hostilities’. Throughout this assessment, parallels are drawn between the conduct of the USA today and between that of WWI-era Germany, which was characterised by Kriegsraison’s pervasive influence. Finally, the article contends that the use of armed drones as the primary tool for carrying out the targeted killing programme must be scrutinised, as this is vital to understanding the practical implementation of the Kriegsraison doctrine.
    • 10 años de "Observatori de Bioètica i Dret"

      Montserrat Escartín Gual (Universidad de Barcelona, 2009-06-01)
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    • 2004 Special Masters Conference: Transcript of Proceedings

      Special Masters, Various (Mitchell Hamline Open Access, 2005-01-01)
      A historic gathering of special masters occurred on October 15th and 16th, 2004 in Saint Paul, Minnesota. Federal and state court-appointed masters from around the country met for the first time to share their experiences as special masters and to form a national association of court appointed masters. This issue of the William Mitchell Law Review contains articles presented at the conference and the transcript of faculty presentations. Throughout the transcript of faculty presentations, the word “speaker” denotes a conference attendee.
    • 2004 Special Masters Conference: Transcript of Proceedings

      Special Masters, Various (Mitchell Open Access, 2005-01-01)
      A historic gathering of special masters occurred on October 15th and 16th, 2004 in Saint Paul, Minnesota. Federal and state court-appointed masters from around the country met for the first time to share their experiences as special masters and to form a national association of court appointed masters. This issue of the William Mitchell Law Review contains articles presented at the conference and the transcript of faculty presentations. Throughout the transcript of faculty presentations, the word “speaker” denotes a conference attendee.
    • 2013 MLK Keynote Address: Harry Belafonte

      + Inclusion, Center for Social Equity; Belafonte, Harry; Maeda, John; Cicilline, David; Cavicchi, Dan (DigitalCommons@RISD, 2013-01-30)
      2013 MLK Keynote, award-winning artist and social activist Harry Belafonte discusses the role of "Artist as Activist".
    • 2013: Intemperie Moral

      Observatori de Bioètica i Dret Observatori de Bioètica i Dret (Universidad de Barcelona, 2013-01-01)
      -
    • 2014 MLK Keynote Address: Marian Wright Edelman

      + Inclusion, Center for Social Equity; Edelman, Marian Wright; Sproll, Paul; Somerson, Rosanne; Spalter, Michael (DigitalCommons@RISD, 2014-01-30)
      2014 MLK Keynote, Marian Wright Edelman shares her thoughts on creative endeavor, social change and the urgency of advancing democracy.
    • 2015 MLK Keynote Address: Danny Glover

      + Inclusion, Center for Social Equity; Glover, Danny; Fessler, Anne; Somerson, Rosanne (DigitalCommons@RISD, 2015-01-31)
      2015 MLK Series Keynote, actor, producer and humanitarian Danny Glover speaks on “Creativity and Democracy: Social Change Through the Arts".
    • 2015 MLK Lecture: Tim Wise

      + Inclusion, Center for Social Equity; Wise, Tim; Eddy, Jean; Crelli, Lucille (DigitalCommons@RISD, 2015-10-20)
      2015 MLK Series Lecturer, anti-racism author and activist Tim Wise speaks on privilege and the harms of inequity.
    • 2015 Survey of Rhode Island Law: Cases and Public Laws of Note

      Roger Williams University Law Review Staff (DOCS@RWU, 2016-01-01)
    • 2015|16 MLK Keynote Address: Andrew Young

      + Inclusion, Center for Social Equity; Young, Andrew; Cavicchi, Dan; Somerson, Rosanne (DigitalCommons@RISD, 2016-01-23)
      2015|16 MLK Series Keynote, civil rights activist and U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Andrew Young speaks on facilitating change through the eradication of poverty, racism and war.
    • 2015|16 MLK Lecture: Faith Ringgold: More than 60 Years

      + Inclusion, Center for Social Equity; Ringgold, Faith; Sharma, Pradeep (DigitalCommons@RISD, 2016-04-14)
      2015|16 MLK Series Keynote, artist, activist, author and teacher Faith Ringgold shares inspiring, humorous and very human stories illustrating her life’s work. Through political imagery and first-hand accounts of the civil rights movement of the 1960s, she contextualizes her immense body of work and reflects on how artists and designers use creativity and making to advance the values of democracy, equity and access for all.
    • 2017 MLK Keynote Address: Emory Douglas

      + Inclusion, Center for Social Equity; Douglas, Emory; Baker, Barbara; Werowinski, Emma; Somerson, Rosanne; Skolos, Nancy (DigitalCommons@RISD, 2017-01-20)
      An artist, educator and human rights activist, Emory Douglas served as the Minister of Culture for the Black Panther Party from 1967-80. Best known for his political drawings and cartoons in the Black Panther Newspaper, he articulated the injustices experienced by African Americans living in the inner city, the growing militancy and organization among urban black youth in the face of police violence and the need for community-based social programs. 2017 MLK Keynote, Emory Douglas discusses the process, meaning and impact of his artwork then and now.
    • 2017 MLK Keynote Emory Douglas Educational Foldout

      + Inclusion, Center for Social Equity; Douglas, Emory (DigitalCommons@RISD, 2017-01-20)
      Educational foldout for the 2017 MLK Keynote Address: Emory Douglas. An artist, educator and human rights activist, Emory Douglas served as the Minister of Culture for the Black Panther Party from 1967-80. Best known for his political drawings and cartoons in the Black Panther Newspaper, he articulated the injustices experienced by African Americans living in the inner city, the growing militancy and organization among urban black youth in the face of police violence and the need for community-based social programs. 2017 MLK Keynote, Emory Douglas discusses the process, meaning and impact of his artwork then and now.
    • 2017 MLK Keynote Emory Douglas Educational Foldout

      + Inclusion, Center for Social Equity; Douglas, Emory (DigitalCommons@RISD, 2017-01-21)
      Educational foldout for the 2017 MLK Keynote Address: Emory Douglas. An artist, educator and human rights activist, Emory Douglas served as the Minister of Culture for the Black Panther Party from 1967-80. Best known for his political drawings and cartoons in the Black Panther Newspaper, he articulated the injustices experienced by African Americans living in the inner city, the growing militancy and organization among urban black youth in the face of police violence and the need for community-based social programs. 2017 MLK Keynote, Emory Douglas discusses the process, meaning and impact of his artwork then and now.
    • 2017 MLK Keynote Emory Douglas Program

      + Inclusion, Center for Social Equity; Douglas, Emory (DigitalCommons@RISD, 2017-01-20)
      Program for the 2017 MLK Keynote Address: Emory Douglas. An artist, educator and human rights activist, Emory Douglas served as the Minister of Culture for the Black Panther Party from 1967-80. Best known for his political drawings and cartoons in the Black Panther Newspaper, he articulated the injustices experienced by African Americans living in the inner city, the growing militancy and organization among urban black youth in the face of police violence and the need for community-based social programs. 2017 MLK Keynote, Emory Douglas discusses the process, meaning and impact of his artwork then and now.
    • 2017 MLK Keynote Emory Douglas Program

      + Inclusion, Center for Social Equity; Douglas, Emory (DigitalCommons@RISD, 2017-01-21)
      Program for the 2017 MLK Keynote Address: Emory Douglas. An artist, educator and human rights activist, Emory Douglas served as the Minister of Culture for the Black Panther Party from 1967-80. Best known for his political drawings and cartoons in the Black Panther Newspaper, he articulated the injustices experienced by African Americans living in the inner city, the growing militancy and organization among urban black youth in the face of police violence and the need for community-based social programs. 2017 MLK Keynote, Emory Douglas discusses the process, meaning and impact of his artwork then and now.
    • 2018 MLK Keynote Address: Roxane Gay

      Center for Social Equity & Inclusion,; Gay, Roxane; Johnson, Anthony; Somerson, Rosanne (DigitalCommons@RISD, 2018-03-03)
      2017|18 MLK Series Keynote and Honoree, author and cultural critic Roxane Gay hosts the lecture "An Evening with Roxane Gay" in the RISD Auditorium,17 Canal Walk, Providence RI Friday, March 2, 2018 at 7pm. Roxane's writing is unmatched and widely revered. Her work garners international acclaim for its reflective, no-holds-barred exploration of feminism and social criticism. With a deft eye on modern culture, she brilliantly critiques its ebb and flow with both wit and ferocity. Words like “courage,” “humor,” and “smart” are frequently deployed when describing Roxane. Her collection of essays, Bad Feminist, is universally considered the quintessential exploration of modern feminism. Roxane is a contributing op-ed writer for The New York Times, w co-editor of PANK, and formerly w non-fiction editor at The Rumpus. Her writing also appeared in McSweeney’s, The Nation and many other publications. She recently became the first black woman to ever write for Marvel, writing a comic series in the Black Panther universe called World of Wakanda. Roxane fronts a small army of avid fans on social media and when she finds the time, she dominates the occasional Scrabble tournament. www.roxanegay.com
    • 2019 MLK Keynote Address: Cornel West

      Center for Social Equity & Inclusion,; West, Cornel (DigitalCommons@RISD, 2019-01-23)
      2019 MLK Series Keynote Cornel West lecture Wednesday, January 23, 2019 at 7:00pm, RISD Auditorium,17 Canal Walk, Providence RI. The Center for Social Equity and Inclusion (SEI) welcomes 2019 MLK Series Keynote speaker Cornel West, a professor, philosopher, author and activist. West is professor of the practice of public philosophy at Harvard University and a professor emeritus at Princeton University. He has also taught at Union Theological Seminary, Yale, and the University of Paris and has written and edited many books about race and democracy, including Race Matters, Democracy Matters and the memoir Brother West: Living and Loving Out Loud. His most recent book, Black Prophetic Fire, offers an unflinching look at visionary 19th- and 20th-century African American leaders and their legacies. West is a frequent guest on the Bill Maher Show, CNN, C-Span and Democracy Now. He made his film debut in the Matrix and was the commentator (with Ken Wilbur) on the official trilogy released in 2004. He also has appeared in more than 25 documentaries and films, including Examined Life, Call & Response, Sidewalk and Stand. In communicating with a vast variety of publics, West is committed to keeping alive Martin Luther King, Jr.'s legacy of truth-telling and bearing witness to love and justice.
    • 2020 MLK Keynote Address: Michelle Alexander Powerpoint Presentation

      Center for Social Equity & Inclusion,; Alexander, Michelle; Somerson, Rosanne; Shenoda, Matthew (DigitalCommons@RISD, 2020-01-23)
      2020 MLK Series Keynote Michelle Alexander brings audiences profoundly necessary and meaningful insights on the practice of mass incarceration that plagues the US justice system, as well as eye-opening conversation on how we can end racial caste in America. Lecture Wednesday, January 22, 2020 at 5:30pm, RISD Auditorium, 17 Canal Walk, Providence, RI. In her acclaimed bestseller The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness, Alexander peels back the curtain on systemic racism in the US prison system in a work that the New York Review of Books describes as "striking in the intelligence of her ideas, her powers of summary and the force of her writing." With equal force and candor on stage, she breaks the silence about racial injustice in the modern legal system to reveal how mass incarceration has come to replace segregation. A legal scholar, social justice advocate, columnist at The New York Times and visiting professor at Union Theological Seminary, Alexander explores the myths surrounding our criminal justice system from a racial and ethical standpoint and offers solutions for combating this epidemic. Delivering an emphatic wakeup call from the "colorblind slumber" that our country has fallen under, she leaves audiences with a new perspective on the challenges facing the civil rights community and a call to action for a multiracial, multi-ethnic human rights movement for justice in America.