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dc.contributorUnite de recherche migrations et sociétés (URMIS)
dc.contributorUniversité Nice Sophia Antipolis (UNS) - Université Paris Diderot - Paris 7 (UP7) - Institut de recherche pour le développement [IRD] : UR205 - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS)
dc.contributor.authorVidal, Denis
dc.date.accessioned2019-11-05T12:41:50Z
dc.date.available2019-11-05T12:41:50Z
dc.date.created2016-04-14 23:13
dc.date.issued2016-04-07
dc.identifieroai:HAL:hal-01299365v1
dc.identifierhal-01299365
dc.identifierhttps://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-01299365
dc.identifierhttps://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-01299365/document
dc.identifierhttps://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-01299365/file/Moral%20Controversies%20and%20%E2%80%98empirical%E2%80%99%20validations%20in%20the%20Himalayas%20%28Aout%202013%29.pdf
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12424/3858201
dc.description.abstractIs it possible to imagine that one may feel morally right to kill and decapitate an old man in the middle of the night who is completely defenceless andwho had been particularly kind to you when you were a child?According to cultural relativism, this a distinct possibilityif you belong to a culture where such behaviour is effectively acceptable and you have been socialised in it and interiorised its values.But if you strongly believe in the universality of moral values, you will no doubt consider that any one who is not perverse would spontaneously find such behaviour completely abhorrent, whatever his or her culture, his or her educationand the sort of legitimacy which may be claimed for such an act.Finally, if you are following some of the recent researches taking place in the anthropology of morality, you will probably judge that both perspectives are not necessarily contradictory; you may consider that much depends, from a methodological point of view, on the level of analysis taken into consideration.One may then consider simultaneously that:-All human beings share spontaneously, perhaps even genetically, an equal repulsion to killing an other human being, especially so if one knows him personally and he is defenceless, as it is often the case in the revenge killings which take place in the sort of Himalayan feuds that I have been studying .-But in spite of such a spontaneous repulsion whose existence may evenhave been proved if you agree with the findings of some experiments by developmental psychologists, it is nonetheless the case that in certain cultures such practices have been not only regularly practiced but have also considered perfectly moral and legitimate, and also accepted as such, in particular by people who practice such feuds. The relevance of the analytical distinction-eventually also the compatibility – between, on the one hand, innate moral dispositions which may well have an universal character and, on the other hand, other moral characteristics which are much more culture-specific – has been highlighted in thepioneering works of Elliot Turiel in the eighties (Turiel 1983). But new research has also developed more recently around this same distinction, both in cognitive anthropology and in cognitive psychology.
dc.languageen
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherHAL CCSD
dc.subjectthe 'two periods' theory
dc.subjectfeuds
dc.subjectmurders
dc.subjectsacrifices
dc.subjectHimalaya
dc.subjectHimachal pradesh
dc.subjectmoral dilemmas
dc.subjectRichard Schweder
dc.subjectrevenge
dc.subjectuniversal moral values
dc.subjectHinduism
dc.subjectBhagavad Gita
dc.subjectcultural relativism
dc.subject[SHS.ANTHRO-SE] Humanities and Social Sciences/Social Anthropology and ethnology
dc.title‘ O brother, do not behave like this’
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/preprint
ge.collectioncodeOAIDATA
ge.dataimportlabelOAI metadata object
ge.identifier.legacyglobethics:8909019
ge.identifier.permalinkhttps://www.globethics.net/gel/8909019
ge.lastmodificationdate2016-04-14 23:13
ge.submissions0
ge.oai.exportid148650
ge.oai.repositoryid702
ge.oai.setnamePreprints, Working Papers, ...
ge.oai.setnameHumanities and Social Sciences
ge.oai.setnameCNRS - Centre national de la recherche scientifique
ge.oai.setnameUniversité Nice Sophia Antipolis
ge.oai.setnameUniversité Denis Diderot - Paris VII
ge.oai.setnameArchives ouvertes de l'Ethnologie
ge.oai.setnameProductions de l'ethnologie
ge.oai.setnameIRD - Institut de recherche pour le développement
ge.oai.setnameUnite de Recherche Migrations et Sociétés
ge.oai.setnameSciences de l'Homme et de la Société
ge.oai.setnameUnite de Recherche Migrations et Sociétés - Nice
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ge.oai.setspecsubject:shs
ge.oai.setspeccollection:CNRS
ge.oai.setspeccollection:UNICE
ge.oai.setspeccollection:UNIV-PARIS7
ge.oai.setspeccollection:AO-ETHNO
ge.oai.setspeccollection:ETHNO
ge.oai.setspeccollection:IRD
ge.oai.setspeccollection:URMIS
ge.oai.setspeccollection:SHS
ge.oai.setspeccollection:URMIS-NICE
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ge.setnameGlobeEthicsLib
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ge.linkhttps://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-01299365
ge.linkhttps://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-01299365/document
ge.linkhttps://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-01299365/file/Moral%20Controversies%20and%20%E2%80%98empirical%E2%80%99%20validations%20in%20the%20Himalayas%20%28Aout%202013%29.pdf


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