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dc.contributor.authorGwin, Lauren
dc.contributor.authorOwley, Jessica
dc.contributor.authorFairfax, Sally K.
dc.date.accessioned2020-03-04T21:35:29Z
dc.date.available2020-03-04T21:35:29Z
dc.date.created2020-01-29 00:33
dc.date.issued2019-01-21
dc.identifieroai:scholarship.law.duke.edu:delpf-1367
dc.identifierhttps://scholarship.law.duke.edu/delpf/vol30/iss1/2
dc.identifierhttps://scholarship.law.duke.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1367&context=delpf
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12424/3864292
dc.description.abstractThe National Trust in England, Wales, and Northern Ireland is one of the oldest and most revered private land conservation organizations in the world. While the private land conservation movements in the United States and the United Kingdom began at a similar time and with similar tools, conservation attitudes and methods in the two countries diverged. Today, the National Trust dominates land conservation in the U.K. while the strength of the U.S. movement is the energy of over 1,500 smaller organizations operating at different scales across the country. Despite the differences, this project looks to the National Trust in England and concludes that three elements of the National Trust’s experience provide important insights for U.S. land trusts rethinking their programs as political and environmental change engulfs the planet. First, the National Trust has gone through several iterations in its understanding of general public benefit and public access to protected properties in a way that most U.S. land trusts have yet to do. Second, National Trust experience suggests that U.S. land trusts could become more engaged in land-use regulations rather than presenting themselves primarily as an alternative (private, compensated, voluntary) thereto. Finally, the National Trust’s approaches to balancing agricultural productivity with sustainability provide useful models to study and emulate in the management of working landscapes. Many of the lessons learned by the National Trust could enrich private land conservation in the United States in an era of government withdrawal from environmental protection and growing impacts of climate change.
dc.format.mediumapplication/pdf
dc.publisherDuke University School of Law
dc.sourceDuke Environmental Law & Policy Forum
dc.subjectLaw
dc.titleWhat can the Apple Teach the Orange? Lessons U.S. Land Trusts can Learn from the National Trust in the U.K.
dc.typetext
ge.collectioncode1064-3958
ge.dataimportlabelOAI metadata object
ge.identifier.legacyglobethics:16569080
ge.lastmodificationdate2020-01-29 00:33
ge.lastmodificationuseradmin@pointsoftware.ch (import)
ge.submissions0
ge.oai.exportid147753
ge.oai.repositoryid2033
ge.oai.setnameJournals
ge.oai.setnamePolicy Forum
ge.oai.setspecpublication:journals
ge.oai.setspecpublication:delpf
ge.oai.streamid2
ge.setnameGlobeEthicsLib
ge.setspecglobeethicslib
ge.linkhttps://scholarship.law.duke.edu/delpf/vol30/iss1/2
ge.linkhttps://scholarship.law.duke.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1367&context=delpf


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