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dc.contributor.authorYun, Heoncheol
dc.contributor.authorPark, Sanghoon
dc.contributor.authorKim, Dongho
dc.contributor.authorJung, Eulho
dc.contributor.authorYoon, Meehyun
dc.date.accessioned2020-07-16T18:43:00Z
dc.date.available2020-07-16T18:43:00Z
dc.date.created2020-07-14 23:33
dc.date.issued2020-06-26
dc.identifieroai:ojs.ascilite.org.au:article/5879
dc.identifierhttps://ajet.org.au/index.php/AJET/article/view/5879
dc.identifier10.14742/ajet.5879
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12424/3954840
dc.description.abstractMotivational regulation strategies have been used as active forms of promoting motivation in online and classroom learning. Based on the motivational regulation model combining both contextual and individual factors, this study examined how students’ academic levels (undergraduate vs. graduate) and the type of course delivery mode (online vs. traditional face-to-face) influence their uses of eight motivational regulation strategies and three types of engagement. A total of 190 students consisting of 95 undergraduate students and 95 graduate students participated in this study. The results of two-way multivariate analysis of variance show that students use different sets of motivational regulation strategies depending upon their academic levels and course delivery modes. Also, graduate students showed significantly higher engagement in all three types than undergraduate students did. The findings provide practical implications for designing a customised motivational support system with specific sets of motivational regulation strategies for students in different academic levels and course delivery modes.
dc.format.mediumapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherASCILITE
dc.relation.ispartofhttps://ajet.org.au/index.php/AJET/article/view/5879/1656
dc.rightsCopyright (c) 2020 Heoncheol Yun, Sanghoon Park, Dongho Kim, Eulho Jung, Meehyun Yoon
dc.sourceAustralasian Journal of Educational Technology; Vol. 36 No. 3 (2020): AJET; 89-103
dc.subjectlearning motivation
dc.subjectmotivational regulation
dc.subjectlearning engagement
dc.subjectquantitative
dc.subjectmotivation
dc.titleThe influence of academic level and course delivery mode on the use of motivational regulation strategies and learning engagement
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/article
ge.collectioncode1449-5554
ge.dataimportlabelOAI metadata object
ge.identifier.legacyglobethics:16782246
ge.lastmodificationdate2020-07-14 23:33
ge.lastmodificationuseradmin@pointsoftware.ch (import)
ge.submissions0
ge.oai.exportid150303
ge.oai.repositoryid102036
ge.oai.setnameArticles
ge.oai.setspecAJET:ART
ge.oai.streamid2
ge.setnameGlobeEthicsLib
ge.setspecglobeethicslib
ge.linkhttps://ajet.org.au/index.php/AJET/article/view/5879


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