• e-Learning in the Arab Gulf: Responding to the Changing World of Education

      Ramady, M.A.; Sultan, N.; van de Bunt, S.G.M.; Davidson, C.; Senteni, A.; Weir, D. (Springer Verlag, 2012)
    • E-learning to improve suicide prevention practice skills among undergraduate psychology students:Randomized controlled trial

      Kullberg, Marie Louise J.; Mouthaan, Joanne; Schoorl, Maartje; De Beurs, Derek; Kenter, Robin Maria Francisca; Kerkhof, Ad J.F.M. (2020-01)
      <
    • E-learning to improve suicide prevention practice skills among undergraduate psychology students:Randomized controlled trial

      Kullberg, Marie Louise J.; Mouthaan, Joanne; Schoorl, Maartje; De Beurs, Derek; Kenter, Robin Maria Francisca; Kerkhof, Ad J.F.M. (2020-01)
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    • E-læring og sammenhængende skole og dagtilbudsudvikling

      Hansen, Line Skov; Hansen, Ole; Guttorm Andersen, Pia (2012-08)
      The content of this article includes experiences
    • Early Findings of Preventive Child Healthcare Professionals Predict Psychosocial Problems in Preadolescence: The TRAILS Study

      Jaspers, M; de Winter, AF; de Meer, G; Stewart, RE; Verhulst, Frank; Ormel, J; Reijneveld, SA (2010)
      Objective To develop and validate a prediction model for psychosocial problems in preadolescence using data on early developmental factors from routine Preventive Child Healthcare (PCH). Study design The data come from the 1692 participants who take part in the TRacking Adolescents' Individual Lives Survey, a longitudinal study. Information on early developmental factors (ages 0 to 4 years) was collected from the PCH file. Parents complete the Child Behavior Checklist when their child is age 11. To examine the predictive value of PCH-registered developmental factors on preadolescent problems, several multiple logistic regression analysis were performed, in a derivation sample (n = 1058). The predictive performance of the models was then assessed with area under the curve (AUC) in a validation sample (n = 643) to evaluate the validity of these models. Results PCH-registered behavioral problems, attention/hyperactivity problems, enuresis, education level of the father, and being male were found to significantly predict externalizing problems (odds ratios [OR] between 1.4 and 3.7). Internalizing problems were predicted by maternal smoking during pregnancy, sleep problems, and being male (ORs between 1.7 and 3.0). The model for externalizing problems had a modest discriminatory power (AUC 0.66, 95% confidence interval 0.59-0.72). However, for internalizing problems the AUC was 0.54 (95% confidence interval 0.47-0.60), indicating poor discriminatory power. Conclusions Findings on early development as registered by PCH are modestly predictive for externalizing problems in preadolescents, but only slightly for internalizing problems. (J Pediatr 2010;157:316-21).
    • Early Language Learning in Pre-primary Education in Portugal

      Centro de Estudos Ingleses de Tradução e Anglo-portugueses (CETAPS); Mourão, Sandie; Ferreirinha, Sónia (Associação Portuguesa de Professores de Inglês, 2021-09-16)
      UID/ELT/04097/2013
    • Early warning systems for more effective student counselling in higher education:Evidence from a Dutch field experiment

      Plak, Simone; Cornelisz, Ilja; Meeter, Martijn; van Klaveren, Chris (2022-01-01)
      Early Warning Systems (EWS) in higher education accommodate student counsellors by identifying at-risk students and allow them to intervene in a timely manner to prevent student dropout. This study evaluates an EWS that shares student-specific risk information with student counsellors, which was implemented at a large Dutch university. A randomised field experiment was conducted to estimate the effect of EWS-assisted counselling on first-year student dropout and academic performance. The results show that the EWS accurately predicts at-risk students. Yet, EWS-assisted counselling did not reduce dropout, nor improved academic performance. Solving the underlying problem of poor academic performance might require additional actionable feedback and recommended counselling practices.
    • Early warning systems for more effective student counselling in higher education:Evidence from a Dutch field experiment

      Plak, Simone; Cornelisz, Ilja; Meeter, Martijn; van Klaveren, Chris (2022-01-01)
      Early Warning Systems (EWS) in higher education accommodate student counsellors by identifying at-risk students and allow them to intervene in a timely manner to prevent student dropout. This study evaluates an EWS that shares student-specific risk information with student counsellors, which was implemented at a large Dutch university. A randomised field experiment was conducted to estimate the effect of EWS-assisted counselling on first-year student dropout and academic performance. The results show that the EWS accurately predicts at-risk students. Yet, EWS-assisted counselling did not reduce dropout, nor improved academic performance. Solving the underlying problem of poor academic performance might require additional actionable feedback and recommended counselling practices.
    • Ecological violence and the quest for justice

      Eze, Chielozona (Taylor & Francis Group, 2021)
      This chapter argues that the awareness of the fragility of our environment and that of human life are the two sides of the same coin of the human condition. The argument is structured in three steps: (a) discussion of the environment as an integral part of the common good and a moral responsibility for all; (b) analysis of the sociocultural philosophy of Wangari Maathai, Africa’s preeminent environmentalist and Nobel Peace Prize winner; and (c) examination of the colonial mindset that guides the relationship between developed and developing nations concerning ecological violence. It concludes with the discussion of the works of African writers who position ecological violence as a quest for justice. They include Gabriel Okara, Tanure Ojaide, Ogaga Ifowodo, Nnimmo Bassey, and Helon Habila.
    • EDITORIAL Open Access Global mental health and Minas International Journal of Mental Health Systems 2014, 8:27

      The Pennsylvania State University CiteSeerX Archives; Harry Minas (2016-08-25)
      mental disorders and psychosocial disabilities (and peo-ple with physical, sensory, or intellectual disabilities), have been largely excluded from the benefits of these broad done to improve the mental health of populations but, in most parts of the world we are still a long way from implementing what we know. The reasons for implemen-tation failure are not hard to find. At the centre of most of these reasons is a failure to accord sufficient political pri-ority to population mental health [10] and to investment
    • Editorial: Exploring the Near Future or Next Practice of Problem-Based Learning

      Bertel, Lykke Brogaard; Kolmos, Anette; Ryberg, Thomas (2021-12-20)
    • Educating 'surplus population': uses and abuses of aspiration in the rural peripheries of a globalising world

      Ansell, N; Froerer, P; Huijsmans, Roy; Dungey, CE; Dost, AC; Piti, (2020-12-04)
      Increasing school enrolment has been a focus of investment, even in remote rural areas whose populations are surplus to the requirements of the global economy. Drawing on ethnographic research conducted in primary schools and their neighbouring communities in rural areas of Lesotho, India and Laos, we explore how young people, their parents and teachers experience schooling in places where the prospects of incorporation into professional employment (or any well rewarded economic activity) are slim. We show how schooling uses aspiration, holding out a promise of a 'better future' remote from the lives of rural children. However, children’s attachment to such promises is tenuous, boosted yet troubled by the small minority who defy the odds and succeed. We question why education systems continue to promote occupational aspirations that are unattainable by most, and why donors and governments invest so heavily in increasing human capital that cannot be absorbed.
    • Educating fot the future; the position of school geography

      Pauw, I. (2015)
      Documents about "skills for the twenty-first century" envisage an increasingly competitive, globalized and technologically advanced world that schools should prepare for by focusing on a range of "skills". Policy documents and position papers about geographical education mainly assume that the world of the near future will be highly problematic, with many pressing issues, which is presented as legitimation for the importance of geographical knowledge and skills. Both types of future images are taken for fact and lack reflection in the documents. Futures education takes a very different approach to the future. Futures-plural since many different futures are imaginable-should be the object of teaching and learning, using powerful knowledge as well as envisioning and reflective practice. It will be argued in this article that geographical education would be enriched-and could move beyond unreflective rhetoric about "the future"-by taking the suggestions from futures education seriously. Futures-oriented school geography requires the use of powerful knowledge and an awareness of the situatedness of all knowledge. It is also a natural setting for pedagogical innovation. And finally, future orientation in geography will help in taking a critical position with regard to sense and nonsense of the "twenty-first century skills" movement.
    • Educating fot the future; the position of school geography

      Pauw, I. (2015)
      Documents about "skills for the twenty-first century" envisage an increasingly competitive, globalized and technologically advanced world that schools should prepare for by focusing on a range of "skills". Policy documents and position papers about geographical education mainly assume that the world of the near future will be highly problematic, with many pressing issues, which is presented as legitimation for the importance of geographical knowledge and skills. Both types of future images are taken for fact and lack reflection in the documents. Futures education takes a very different approach to the future. Futures-plural since many different futures are imaginable-should be the object of teaching and learning, using powerful knowledge as well as envisioning and reflective practice. It will be argued in this article that geographical education would be enriched-and could move beyond unreflective rhetoric about "the future"-by taking the suggestions from futures education seriously. Futures-oriented school geography requires the use of powerful knowledge and an awareness of the situatedness of all knowledge. It is also a natural setting for pedagogical innovation. And finally, future orientation in geography will help in taking a critical position with regard to sense and nonsense of the "twenty-first century skills" movement.
    • Education

      Barber, Sian; Caoduro, Elena; Knörr, Kai (2022-08-03)
      The articles included in this issue take into consideration the relationship between television and education in its broadest sense, offering historical studies of television programming, national policies, audience attitudes and evolving socio-political contexts. It includes case studies of different broadcasters, specific educational programming initiatives, government or state education policy delivered through the television medium, the intersections between broadcast programmes and what is retained in television archives. They cover Turkey, Germany, Italy, the UK, and Finland and map the period from the 1960s to the present day. All of this material helps situate educational provision on television within broader histories of both television as a form and education as an overarching idea or objective.
    • Education

      Barber, Sian; Caoduro, Elena; Knörr, Kai (2022-08-03)
      The articles included in this issue take into consideration the relationship between television and education in its broadest sense, offering historical studies of television programming, national policies, audience attitudes and evolving socio-political contexts. It includes case studies of different broadcasters, specific educational programming initiatives, government or state education policy delivered through the television medium, the intersections between broadcast programmes and what is retained in television archives. They cover Turkey, Germany, Italy, the UK, and Finland and map the period from the 1960s to the present day. All of this material helps situate educational provision on television within broader histories of both television as a form and education as an overarching idea or objective.
    • Education : worthwhile education for ethical human development

      Boni, Alejandra; Wilson-Strydom, Merridy (Taylor & Francis Group, 2018)
      This chapter has two main objectives: first, to reflect, from the perspective of development ethics, on how different theories of development (liberal capitalist, Marxist, post-colonial and post-development, liberal egalitarian and radical humanist approaches) have understood education. The second objective is to position ourselves in a particular perspective, the capability approach for human development enriched by elements of other theories of development, and use it to analyze a particular case in South Africa, in the city of Bloemfontein. This case study demonstrates what a human development and capability approach to education might look like and what aspects are considered in research education and development from this perspective. Key values such as equality, diversity and participation are essential to promote a worthwhile education that acts as capability multiplier, not only for the students themselves but also for their families and communities.
    • Education as Proxy for Cognitive Reserve in a Large Elderly Memory Clinic: 'Window of Benefit'

      Staekenborg, Salka S.; Kelly, Naomi; Schuur, Jacqueline; Koster, Pieter; Scherder, Erik; Tielkes, Caroline E.M.; Scheltens, Philip; Claus, Jules J. (2020-07-21)
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