• Taalonderzoek in de praktijk

      van der Wilt, F.M. (2019-05)
      Femke van der Wilt promoveerde aan de VU op de rol van communicatieve taalvaardigheid bij sociale afwijzing. Leidt een lager niveau van taalvaardigheid eerder tot sociale afwijzing dan bij kinderen die dit lagere niveau niet hebben? In de literatuur is vrijwel alleen de woordenschat onderzocht. Daarom onderzocht zij de communicatieve taalvaardigheid. Hieruit bleek dat een lage score daarin inderdaad samenhing met meer afwijzing.
    • Taalonderzoek in de praktijk

      van der Wilt, F.M. (2019-05)
      Femke van der Wilt promoveerde aan de VU op de rol van communicatieve taalvaardigheid bij sociale afwijzing. Leidt een lager niveau van taalvaardigheid eerder tot sociale afwijzing dan bij kinderen die dit lagere niveau niet hebben? In de literatuur is vrijwel alleen de woordenschat onderzocht. Daarom onderzocht zij de communicatieve taalvaardigheid. Hieruit bleek dat een lage score daarin inderdaad samenhing met meer afwijzing.
    • Tackling The Global Challenge: Humanitarian Catastrophes

      Iserson, Kenneth V. (eScholarship, University of California, 2014-01-01)
      “Humanitarian catastrophes,” conflicts and calamities generating both widespread human suffering and destructive events, require a wide range of emergency resources. This paper answers a number of questions that humanitarian catastrophes generate: Why and how do the most-developed countries—those with the resources, capabilities, and willingness to help—intervene in specific types of disasters? What ethical and legal guidelines shape our interventions? How well do we achieve our goals? It then suggests a number of changes to improve humanitarian responses, including better NGO-government cooperation, increased research on the best disaster response methods, clarification of the criteria and roles for humanitarian (military) interventions, and development of post-2015 Millennium Development Goals with more accurate progress measures. [West J Emerg Med. 2014;15(2):231–240.]
    • Tailoring explicit and implicit instruction methods to the verbal working memory capacity of students with special needs can benefit motor learning outcomes in physical education

      Kok, M.; Kal, E.; van Doodewaard, C.; Savelsbergh, G.; van der Kamp, J. (2021-07-01)
      © 2021 The AuthorsThis study examined the effects of explicit versus implicit instructions and feedback methods on motor learning and perceived competence of 9-to 13-year old students with special educational needs practicing a balancing task during physical education. The aim was to test if and how the effects of type of instruction and feedback methods were influenced by students' verbal and visuospatial working memory capacities. The students significantly increased their balancing performance and perceived competence from pre- to posttest, with no differences between groups. The relation between type of instruction and feedback methods and learning outcomes was significantly influenced by verbal working memory capacity, not by visuospatial working memory capacity. Physical education teachers may need to align their instructions with verbal working memory capacity, by providing implicit instructions and feedback methods in students with low verbal working memory capacity and explicit instruction and feedback methods in students with high verbal working memory capacity.
    • Talking Theory of Mind Talk: Young School-Aged Children’s Everyday Conversation and Understanding of Mind and Emotion

      De Rosnay, M.; Fink, E.; Begeer, S.M.; Slaughter, V.; Peterson, C. (2014)
      Links between young children's everyday use of mindful conversational skills and their success on laboratory tests of theory of mind understanding (ToM) were evaluated. Using published scales, teachers rated the conversational behavior and shyness of 129 children aged 60 to 101 months (MÂ =Â 78·8 months) who were in their first years of primary school. The children also took batteries of first- and second-order false-belief tests along with tests of emotion understanding and general language ability. Correlational and regression analyses showed that performance on false-belief tests of ToM significantly predicted children's competence at reading others' minds in their everyday conversational interactions. Furthermore, these links transcended individual differences in language ability, shy personality, emotion understanding, and age. These findings augment and extend a growing body of evidence linking performance on laboratory ToM tests to socially competent real-world behavior. © Cambridge University Press 2013.
    • Talking Theory of Mind Talk: Young School-Aged Children’s Everyday Conversation and Understanding of Mind and Emotion

      De Rosnay, M.; Fink, E.; Begeer, S.M.; Slaughter, V.; Peterson, C. (2014)
      Links between young children's everyday use of mindful conversational skills and their success on laboratory tests of theory of mind understanding (ToM) were evaluated. Using published scales, teachers rated the conversational behavior and shyness of 129 children aged 60 to 101 months (MÂ =Â 78·8 months) who were in their first years of primary school. The children also took batteries of first- and second-order false-belief tests along with tests of emotion understanding and general language ability. Correlational and regression analyses showed that performance on false-belief tests of ToM significantly predicted children's competence at reading others' minds in their everyday conversational interactions. Furthermore, these links transcended individual differences in language ability, shy personality, emotion understanding, and age. These findings augment and extend a growing body of evidence linking performance on laboratory ToM tests to socially competent real-world behavior. © Cambridge University Press 2013.
    • Task-irrelevant visual letters interact with the processing of speech sounds in heteromodal and unimodal cortex

      Blau, Vera C; van Atteveldt, Nienke; Formisano, Elia; Goebel, Rainer; Blomert, Leo (2008-08)
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    • Task-irrelevant visual letters interact with the processing of speech sounds in heteromodal and unimodal cortex

      Blau, Vera C; van Atteveldt, Nienke; Formisano, Elia; Goebel, Rainer; Blomert, Leo (2008-08)
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    • Tasks and skills in youth with problem behaviour. Development of a questionnaire

      van der Knaap, L.; Schulze, H.; Slot, N.W.; Feij, J.A. (2009)
      Although in treating adolescents with problem behaviour emphasis is placed on teaching skills of immediate relevance to everyday prosocial functioning, instruments for assessing these skills have been lacking. This article describes the development and preliminary validation of an instrument that enables group care workers to assess skilful behaviour in adolescents in residential treatment facilities: the Adolescents' Tasks and Skills Questionnaire (TASQ). TASQ was constructed using data on 567 adolescents in Dutch residential treatment facilities. TASQ's 29 scales provide insight into specific skills and comprise six wide-ranging competency dimensions. Internal consistency is satisfactory and the preliminary validation study yielded promising results. © 2009 Taylor
    • Tasks and skills in youth with problem behaviour. Development of a questionnaire

      van der Knaap, L.; Schulze, H.; Slot, N.W.; Feij, J.A. (2009)
      Although in treating adolescents with problem behaviour emphasis is placed on teaching skills of immediate relevance to everyday prosocial functioning, instruments for assessing these skills have been lacking. This article describes the development and preliminary validation of an instrument that enables group care workers to assess skilful behaviour in adolescents in residential treatment facilities: the Adolescents' Tasks and Skills Questionnaire (TASQ). TASQ was constructed using data on 567 adolescents in Dutch residential treatment facilities. TASQ's 29 scales provide insight into specific skills and comprise six wide-ranging competency dimensions. Internal consistency is satisfactory and the preliminary validation study yielded promising results. © 2009 Taylor
    • Teacher characteristics and children’s educational attainment in Ghana: do some teacher characteristics matter more for children attending disadvantaged schools?

      University of Aberdeen.Initial Teacher Education (ITE); University of Aberdeen.Education (Research Theme); Nyatsikor, Maxwell Kwesi; Sosu, Edward; Mtika, Peter; Robson, Dean (2020-09-07)
      Funding Information: The authors are grateful to both the Government of Ghana and their partners for permission to use the data. All results from this research are the responsibility of the authors and do not implicate the custodians of the primary data in any way. Funding. This research relied on data from the Ghana Education Service and RTI International in collaboration with the United States Agency for International Development. This study was partly supported through the Scottish Funding Council GCRF Institutional grant awarded to ES. Publisher Copyright: © Copyright © 2020 Nyatsikor, Sosu, Mtika and Robson. Copyright: Copyright 2020 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.
    • Teacher characteristics, social classroom relationships, and children's social, emotional, and behavioral classroom adjustment in special education

      Breeman, L.D.; Wubbels, T.; van Lier, P.A.C.; Verhulst, F.C.; Van der Ende, J.; Maras, A.; Hopman, J.A.B.; Tick, N.T. (2015)
      The goal of this study was to explore relations between teacher characteristics (i.e., competence and wellbeing); social classroom relationships (i.e., teacher-child and peer interactions); and children's social, emotional, and behavioral classroom adjustment. These relations were explored at both the individual and classroom levels among 414 children with emotional and behavioral disorders placed in special education. Two models were specified. In the first model, children's classroom adjustment was regressed on social relationships and teacher characteristics. In the second model, reversed links were examined by regressing teacher characteristics on social relationships and children's adjustment. Results of model 1 showed that, at the individual level, better social and emotional adjustment of children was predicted by higher levels of teacher-child closeness and better behavioral adjustment was predicted by both positive teacher-child and peer interactions. At the classroom level, positive social relationships were predicted by higher levels of teacher competence, which in turn were associated with lower classroom levels of social problems. Higher levels of teacher wellbeing were directly associated with classroom adaptive and maladaptive child outcomes. Results of model 2 showed that, at the individual and classroom levels, only the emotional and behavioral problems of children predicted social classroom relationships. At the classroom level, teacher competence was best predicted by positive teacher-child relationships and teacher wellbeing was best predicted by classroom levels of prosocial behavior. We discuss the importance of positive teacher-child and peer interactions for children placed in special education and suggest ways of improving classroom processes by targeting teacher competence.
    • Teacher Development through Coteaching Outdoor Science and Environmental Education Across the Elementary-Middle School Transition

      Kerr, Karen (2019-05-22)
      This study considers the benefits of coteaching in the context of the outdoors. It explores the use of coteaching in a professional development programme and investigates all the cited outcome categories for teachers: cognitive, affective, coteaching and professional development. Coteaching pairs co-planned, cotaught and co-evaluated ‘Shared Learning Days’ in the outdoors. Eight teachers took part with 180 students in their last year of elementary school or their first year of (junior) high school. This paper demonstrates how a model of professional development, with coteaching at its core, is beneficial for the development of teachers who are teaching ‘outside’ their comfort zone (outdoors) and expected to focus on skills-based teaching and learning. In particular, the benefits of attitudinal change among the teachers involved is discussed.
    • Teacher perceptions affect boys’ and girls’ reading motivation differently

      Boerma, I.E.; Mol, S.E.; Jolles, J. (2015)
      The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between teacher perceptions and children's reading motivation, with specific attention to gender differences. The reading self-concept, task value, and attitude of 160 fifth and sixth graders were measured. Teachers rated each student's reading comprehension. Results showed that for boys, teacher expectations had no influence on the three constructs of reading motivation measured, whereas for girls, teacher expectations did predict reading self-concept and value of reading. The results provide evidence that the relationship between motivational factors and teacher perceptions is different for boys and girls. The implications for educational practice are addressed.
    • Teacher perceptions affect boys’ and girls’ reading motivation differently

      Boerma, I.E.; Mol, S.E.; Jolles, J. (2015)
      The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between teacher perceptions and children's reading motivation, with specific attention to gender differences. The reading self-concept, task value, and attitude of 160 fifth and sixth graders were measured. Teachers rated each student's reading comprehension. Results showed that for boys, teacher expectations had no influence on the three constructs of reading motivation measured, whereas for girls, teacher expectations did predict reading self-concept and value of reading. The results provide evidence that the relationship between motivational factors and teacher perceptions is different for boys and girls. The implications for educational practice are addressed.
    • Teacher Professional Growth on Assessment Literacy:A Case Study of Prevocational Geography Education in the Netherlands

      Bijsterbosch, Erik; Béneker, Tine; Kuiper, Wilmad; van der Schee, Joop (2019-10-02)
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    • Teacher Professional Growth on Assessment Literacy:A Case Study of Prevocational Geography Education in the Netherlands

      Bijsterbosch, Erik; Béneker, Tine; Kuiper, Wilmad; van der Schee, Joop (2019-10-02)
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    • Teacher Scaffolding in Small-Group Work: An Intervention Study

      van de Pol, J.; Volman, M.; Oort, F.; Beishuizen, J.J. (2014)
      Adapting support contingently to student needs by first diagnosing their current understanding, that is, scaffolding, is considered a key aspect of excellent teaching. The use of classroom scaffolding is rare, however. We therefore investigated the benefits to teachers of a professional development program that was based upon a model of contingent teaching (MCT) with the following 4 steps: diagnostic strategies, checking of diagnoses, giving contingent support, and checking of student learning. In our experimental study, 17 of 30 teachers participated in this program. All of the teachers (prevocational education; teaching social studies) taught the same 5-lesson project on the European Union. The frequency and quality of their use of the 4 steps from the MCT were then compared. The teachers who worked with the MCT increased their teaching quality more than the teachers who did not participate, especially with regard to the steps of contingent teaching. They also showed more complete cycles of contingent teaching at postmeasurement than the other teachers. Less successful teachers showed a tendency to provide less support because they mistakenly thought that prompting was not part of scaffolding. Future scaffolding research and professional development efforts aimed at promoting scaffolding can benefit from the MCT, provided that teachers’ understanding of scaffolding is closely monitored.
    • Teacher ‘quality’ and attainment grouping: The role of within-school teacher deployment in social and educational inequality

      Francis, Becky; Hodgen, Jeremy; Craig, Nicole; Taylor, Becky; Archer, Louise; Mazenod, Anna; Tereschenko, Antonina; Connolly, Paul (2019-01)
      Prior research suggests that where pupils are 'tracked', better qualified, more experienced teachers tend to be deployed to higher attainment groups, at the expense of pupils in lower tracks. This is especially pertinent from a social justice perspective, given consistent findings in the UK that pupils from socially disadvantaged backgrounds are over-represented in low attainment groups. This article draws on data from 380 teachers, drawn from 126 secondary schools in England, and interviews with 118 Year 7 students, to examine whether these findings from prior research in the US and elsewhere extend to the case of England in the present day. Findings show some evidence of these inequitable tendencies: those teachers highly qualified in their taught subject were less likely to be allocated to low sets.We also examine whether an intervention designed to encourage more equitable distribution had any impact on practice, and find tentative evidence that deployment in intervention schools had been impacted in relation to teacher subject qualifications. Pupils believed that teachers of higher sets had higher expectations and standards of behaviour, whereas those for low sets were seen to be unhelpfully indulgent, indicating a need for research attention to pedagogy and tracking. Findings are analysed from a social justice perspective, with interest in the consequences of inequitable distribution of teachers for the reproduction of social inequality.