• Webinar: Sport with a stoma:Sport with a stoma - discussing the challenges faced by ostomates in sport.

      Hamilton, Conor (2022-01-20)
      Provide information on how stoma nurses can help:
    • Well-being : happiness, desires, goods, and needs

      Gutwald, Rebecca (Taylor & Francis Group, 2018)
      This chapter acquaints the reader with the diverse conceptualizations of well-being and human needs theory in development. The first section covers the origins of well-being as a concept in development. The second section presents the central theoretical approaches to well-being, the most central classifications and new trends in conceptualization. The third section examines the human needs discourse and shows why and how an account of human needs can be interpreted as an approach to well-being. The conclusion presents three issues that should be researched further in development ethics: securing well-being over time, the social dimensions of well-being, and the interconnectedness of elements of well-being.
    • What a difference your email makes: Effects of informal e-mail addresses in online résumé screening

      Van Toorenburg, M.; Oostrom, J.K.; Pollet, T.V. (2015)
      Résumés are screened rapidly, with some reports stating that recruiters form their impressions within 10 seconds. Certain résumé characteristics can have a significant impact on the snap judgments these recruiters make. The main goal of the present study was to examine the effect of the e-mail address (formal vs. informal) used in a résumé on the hirability perceptions formed by professional recruiters (N=73). In addition, the effect of the e-mail address on hirability perceptions was compared to the effects of spelling errors and typeface. Participants assessed the cognitive ability, personality, and the hirability of six fictitious applicants for the job of an HR specialist. The hirability ratings for the résumés with informal e-mail addresses were significantly lower than the hirability ratings for résumés that featured a formal e-mail address. The effect of e-mail address was as strong as the effect of spelling errors and stronger than that of typeface. The effect of e-mail address on hirability was mediated by perceptions of conscientiousness and honesty-humility. This study among actual recruiters shows for the first time that the choice of the e-mail address used on a résumé might make a real difference.
    • What and how teacher educators prefer to learn

      Dengerink, J.; Lunenberg, M.L.; Kools, Quinta (2015-02)
      In which areas and domains do individual teacher educators prefer to work on
    • What and how teacher educators prefer to learn

      Dengerink, J.; Lunenberg, M.L.; Kools, Quinta (2015-02)
      In which areas and domains do individual teacher educators prefer to work on
    • What can measures of text comprehension tell us about creative text production?

      Bos, L.T.; de Koning, B.B.; van Wesel, F.; Boonstra, A. M.; van der Schoot, M. (2015)
      Evidence is accumulating that the level of text comprehension is dependent on the situatedness and sensory richness of a child’s mental representation formed during reading. This study investigated whether these factors involved in text comprehension also serve a functional role in writing a narrative. Direct influences of situatedness and sensory richness as well as indirect influences via the number of sensory and situational words on the creativity (i.e., originality/novelty) of a written narrative were examined in 165 primary school children through path analyses. Results showed that sensory richness and situatedness explained 35 % of the variance in creativity scores. Sensory richness influenced the originality/novelty of children’s narrative writing directly, whereas situatedness had an indirect influence, through the number of sensory words, but both pathways influenced the outcomes to a comparable extent. Findings suggest that creative writing requires similar representational processes as reading comprehension, which may contribute to the development of instructional methods to help children in creative writing assignments.
    • What can measures of text comprehension tell us about creative text production?

      Bos, L.T.; de Koning, B.B.; van Wesel, F.; Boonstra, A. M.; van der Schoot, M. (2015)
      Evidence is accumulating that the level of text comprehension is dependent on the situatedness and sensory richness of a child’s mental representation formed during reading. This study investigated whether these factors involved in text comprehension also serve a functional role in writing a narrative. Direct influences of situatedness and sensory richness as well as indirect influences via the number of sensory and situational words on the creativity (i.e., originality/novelty) of a written narrative were examined in 165 primary school children through path analyses. Results showed that sensory richness and situatedness explained 35 % of the variance in creativity scores. Sensory richness influenced the originality/novelty of children’s narrative writing directly, whereas situatedness had an indirect influence, through the number of sensory words, but both pathways influenced the outcomes to a comparable extent. Findings suggest that creative writing requires similar representational processes as reading comprehension, which may contribute to the development of instructional methods to help children in creative writing assignments.
    • What Do Secondary Schools Need to Create Healthier Canteens? The Development of an Implementation Plan

      Evenhuis, I.J.; Vyth, E.L.; Nassau, F.V.; Veldhuis, L.; Westerman, M.J.; Seidell, J.C.; Renders, C.M. (2021-06-23)
      © Copyright © 2021 Evenhuis, Vyth, Nassau, Veldhuis, Westerman, Seidell and Renders.Introduction: The Netherlands Nutrition Centre developed guidelines to improve the availability and accessibility of healthier food products in Dutch canteens. This paper describes the development of an implementation plan to facilitate implementation of Guidelines for Healthier Canteens in Dutch secondary schools. Materials and Methods: In cooperation with stakeholders (i.e., school/caterer managers/employees, school canteen advisors, researchers) and based on theory, we developed an implementation plan in three steps. First, we identified factors that impede/facilitate stakeholders to create a healthier school canteen during 14 interviews. Second, 25 experts discussed and prioritized these identified factors in an expert meeting. Third, we translated these factors into tools to be included in the implementation plan, by making use of behavior change taxonomies and evidence-based implementation strategies. Results: The plan aims to support stakeholders in implementing healthier school canteens and consists of five tools: (1) tailored advice based on an online questionnaire to assess schools' and stakeholders' context and the Canteen Scan (i.e., an online tool to assess the availability and accessibility of food/drink products); (2) communication materials with information and examples; (3) online community for support by sharing experiences/questions; (4) digital newsletter as reminder/support; (5) fact sheet with students' needs/wishes to tailor the canteen. Discussion: This study illustrates how collaboration between science, policy and practice resulted in a tailored implementation plan aimed to support schools to adhere to school canteen policy. This development serves as a good example for researchers, health promotion policymakers, and practitioners how to create an implementation plan that fits the needs of stakeholders.
    • What Do Secondary Schools Need to Create Healthier Canteens? The Development of an Implementation Plan

      Evenhuis, I.J.; Vyth, E.L.; Nassau, F.V.; Veldhuis, L.; Westerman, M.J.; Seidell, J.C.; Renders, C.M. (2021-06-23)
      © Copyright © 2021 Evenhuis, Vyth, Nassau, Veldhuis, Westerman, Seidell and Renders.Introduction: The Netherlands Nutrition Centre developed guidelines to improve the availability and accessibility of healthier food products in Dutch canteens. This paper describes the development of an implementation plan to facilitate implementation of Guidelines for Healthier Canteens in Dutch secondary schools. Materials and Methods: In cooperation with stakeholders (i.e., school/caterer managers/employees, school canteen advisors, researchers) and based on theory, we developed an implementation plan in three steps. First, we identified factors that impede/facilitate stakeholders to create a healthier school canteen during 14 interviews. Second, 25 experts discussed and prioritized these identified factors in an expert meeting. Third, we translated these factors into tools to be included in the implementation plan, by making use of behavior change taxonomies and evidence-based implementation strategies. Results: The plan aims to support stakeholders in implementing healthier school canteens and consists of five tools: (1) tailored advice based on an online questionnaire to assess schools' and stakeholders' context and the Canteen Scan (i.e., an online tool to assess the availability and accessibility of food/drink products); (2) communication materials with information and examples; (3) online community for support by sharing experiences/questions; (4) digital newsletter as reminder/support; (5) fact sheet with students' needs/wishes to tailor the canteen. Discussion: This study illustrates how collaboration between science, policy and practice resulted in a tailored implementation plan aimed to support schools to adhere to school canteen policy. This development serves as a good example for researchers, health promotion policymakers, and practitioners how to create an implementation plan that fits the needs of stakeholders.
    • What does subject-integrated teaching on key global issues in the social studies subjects in Swedish upper primary school look like, and what does it imply for teachers and students?

      University of Aberdeen.Education (Research Theme); University of Aberdeen.Initial Teacher Education (ITE); University of Aberdeen.Education; Olovsson, Tord Göran; Education in the North (2021-05-27)
      Peer reviewed
    • What have we learned?:On students' perceptions of learning and progressing through PBL

      Scholkmann, Antonia; Kjærsdam Telléus, Patrik; Ryberg, Thomas; Hung, Woei; Birch Andreasen, Lars; Busk Kofoed, Lise; Limskov Stærk Christiansen, Nanna; Randrup Nielsen, Stine; Lolle, Elisabeth Lauridsen; Scholkmann, Antonia (Aalborg Universitetsforlag, 2021)
      In 2017 Aalborg University AAU launched a three-year cross-disciplinary project, the PBL Future project, that
    • What is in It for Them? Understanding the Impact of a ‘Support, Appreciate, Listen Team’ (SALT)-Based Suicide Prevention Peer Education Program on Peer Educators

      Zachariah, Bobby; de Wit, Emma E.; Bahirat, Jyotsna Dnyaneshwar; Bunders-Aelen, Joske F.G.; Regeer, Barbara J. (2018-04-06)
      <
    • What is in It for Them? Understanding the Impact of a ‘Support, Appreciate, Listen Team’ (SALT)-Based Suicide Prevention Peer Education Program on Peer Educators

      Zachariah, Bobby; de Wit, Emma E.; Bahirat, Jyotsna Dnyaneshwar; Bunders-Aelen, Joske F.G.; Regeer, Barbara J. (2018-04-06)
      <
    • What Makes Your Dog Itch? Maybe It Is the Kennel Tick!

      Vector borne diseases and pathogens (VBD); Global Health and Tropical Medicine (GHTM); Instituto de Higiene e Medicina Tropical (IHMT); Ferrolho, J; Sanches, Gustavo S; Couto, Joana; Antunes, S; Domingos, A (2018-05-11)
      Once upon a time, in a backyard not very far from you, lived a dog named Rex with long fluffy and shiny hair. Rex really loved to play outside, especially with his best friend and owner Jack, a nine-year-old boy. On a perfect spring day, when it was not too cold or too hot, Jack and Rex went for a walk in a green park close by, and when they returned home Jack noticed that his loyal friend was very itchy and was scratching his ear a lot. His first thought was as follows: “Well, there must be some dirt in his ear! After so much rolling on the grass it is normal.” A few days later Jack saw that Rex was very unhappy and started wondering what was happening. He called his mother quickly and they both rushed to see Rex. “Mommy what’s that on Rex’s ear? It seems like a wart! Is Rex sick?” Then his mother said “Hopefully not! You know Jack, these little things are parasites called ticks and they can make Rex itch and feel uncomfortable. I am sure that if you learn more about such small and incredible creatures, you will be amazed because there is more to them than meets the eye…”
    • What should schools do to promote wonder

      Wolbert, Lynne; Schinkel, Anders (2020)
      Wonder-full education recognises experiences of wonder as lying at
    • What trainee sport psychologists want to learn in supervision

      Hutter, R.I.; Oldenhof-Veldman, T.; Oudejans, R.R.D. (2015)
      Objective: Supervised experience is a crucial element in the education of trainee sport psychologists (TSPs). Insight into the issues that are raised in supervision is relevant for the development of educational programs. The purpose of this study was to gain insight into supervisory issues of TSPs. Design: A mixed methods design was employed. Method: 369 supervision questions from fourteen TSPs were collected from written supervisory reports. The supervision questions were initially rated on the supervisory issues described by Loganbill, Hardy, and Delworth (1982) and Rabinowitz, Heppner, and Roehlke (1986). Inter-rater agreement and occurrence of issues were calculated. An alternative model for supervision questions of TSPs was developed through inductive and deductive analyses. Results: For most of the supervisory issues described by Loganbill et al. (1982) and Rabinowitz et al. (1986) the inter-rater agreement and occurrence was low. An alternative model was developed consisting of two higher-order categories ('Know-how' and 'Professional development'), six lower-order categories ('Intake', 'Treatment plan', 'Execution', 'Reflections', 'Working principles' and 'Coping with dilemmas') and 19 separate themes. Conclusions: The supervisory issues proposed by Loganbill et al. (1982) and Rabinowitz et al. (1986) do not fully capture the learning needs for supervision as formulated by the TSPs studied. Our alternative model provides an overview of supervision questions of TSPs. The developed model may contribute to the quality of trainees' learning in supervision by helping both trainees and supervisors prepare for supervision, and by helping sport psychology educators to offer efficacious curricula and learning experiences. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
    • What we have learned and the way forward

      Rudd, James; Renshaw, Ian; Savelsbergh, Geert; Chow, Jia Yi; Roberts, Will; Newcombe, Daniel; Davids, Keith; Rudd, James; Renshaw, Ian; Newcombe, Daniel; et al. (Routledge, 2021)
      An Ecological Dynamics-based pedagogy demands that the educator or practitioner operates at the behavioural scale of analysis with the capacities and dispositions of the child, such as cognitions, preferred ways of moving, emotions and perceptual skills supporting functional movements. Where the educator or practitioner is able to create an enriched environment which is purposefully designed to provide feel and freedom experienced with unstructured play, but overlayed with careful learning design, it can provide a powerful platform to support children's physical literacy. Physical literacy has been slowly adopted as a worldwide social movement to support long-term health and well-being of our children and young people. A growing number of countries are investing in physical literacy and are integrating this into public policy in education and health to help children become more physically active. Competitive, backyard games promote the conditions to facilitate the development of holistic physical literacy skills and propose that they should become a key feature of talent development programmes.