• XML, RDF, and Relatives

      Klein, Michel (2001)
      Languages for representing data and knowledge are an important aspect of the Semantic Web, and there are a lot of languages around! Most languages are based on XML (eXtensible Markup Language) or use XML as syntax; some have connections to RDF (Resource Description Framework) or RDF schemas. This tutorial briefly introduces XML, XML schemas, RDF and RDF schemas.
    • XML, RDF, and Relatives

      Klein, Michel (2001)
      Languages for representing data and knowledge are an important aspect of the Semantic Web, and there are a lot of languages around! Most languages are based on XML (eXtensible Markup Language) or use XML as syntax; some have connections to RDF (Resource Description Framework) or RDF schemas. This tutorial briefly introduces XML, XML schemas, RDF and RDF schemas.
    • Young children's ability to use a computer mouse

      Donker, A.; Reitsma, P. (2007)
      Because there is little empirical data available on how well young children are able to use a computer mouse, the present study examined their proficiency in clicking on small objects at various positions on the screen and their skill in moving objects over the screen, using drag-and-drop and click-move-click. The participants were 104 children from Kindergarten 2 and Grade 1. The results show that children in Kindergarten 2 clicked and moved slower than children in Grade 1. Nearly all of the children were able to click within 3 mm horizontally and 6 mm vertically from the centre of a 3 mm target. The findings also demonstrate that in educational software drag-and-drop is the most appropriate movement procedure as it was found to be faster than click-move-click and resulted in fewer interaction errors. Interesting differences between horizontal and vertical movements were found. It is concluded that young children are generally well capable of using a mouse to operate educational software, making this a suitable input device for such applications. © 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
    • Young children's ability to use a computer mouse

      Donker, A.; Reitsma, P. (2007)
      Because there is little empirical data available on how well young children are able to use a computer mouse, the present study examined their proficiency in clicking on small objects at various positions on the screen and their skill in moving objects over the screen, using drag-and-drop and click-move-click. The participants were 104 children from Kindergarten 2 and Grade 1. The results show that children in Kindergarten 2 clicked and moved slower than children in Grade 1. Nearly all of the children were able to click within 3 mm horizontally and 6 mm vertically from the centre of a 3 mm target. The findings also demonstrate that in educational software drag-and-drop is the most appropriate movement procedure as it was found to be faster than click-move-click and resulted in fewer interaction errors. Interesting differences between horizontal and vertical movements were found. It is concluded that young children are generally well capable of using a mouse to operate educational software, making this a suitable input device for such applications. © 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
    • Young people, crime and justice in Northern Ireland

      McAlinden, Anne-Marie; Dwyer, Clare; Haydon, Deena; McAlister, Siobhan (Hart Publishing, Oxford, 2015-09)
      Many children and young people in conflict with the law in Northern Ireland have experienced living in poverty, truancy or exclusion from school, limited educational attainment, neglect or abuse within their families, placement in alternative care, drug or alcohol misuse, physical and mental ill-health. However, their lives are also affected by the legacy and particular circumstances of a society in transition from conflict. In addition to historical under-investment in services for children and their families, this includes discriminatory policing alongside informal regulation by ‘paramilitaries’ or members of ‘the community’ and community-based restorative justice schemes as an alternative way of dealing with low-level crime and ‘anti-social’ behaviour.
    • Youth Enfranchisement, Political Responsiveness, and Education Expenditure: Evidence from the U.S.

      Bertocchi , Graziella; Dimico, Arcangelo; Lancia, Francesco; Russo, Alessia (2020-08)
      We examine the link between the political participation of the young and fiscal policies in the U.S. We generate exogenous variation in participation using the passage of preregistration laws, which allow the young to register before being eligible to vote. After documenting that preregistration promotes youth enfranchisement, we show that preregistration shifts state government spending toward higher education, the type of spending for which the young have the strongest preference. A 1% increase in youth voter turnout generates a 0:77% increase in higher education spending. The results collectively suggest political responsiveness to the needs of the newly enfranchised constituency.