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dc.contributor.authorNasr, Sahar
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-25T19:38:33Z
dc.date.available2019-09-25T19:38:33Z
dc.date.created2013-10-24 15:05
dc.date.issued2012-03-19
dc.identifieroai:openknowledge.worldbank.org:10986/2414
dc.identifier978-0-8213-8190-8
dc.identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10986/2414
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12424/453622
dc.description.abstractWomen are a powerful force for sustainable economic growth. A growing body of microeconomic empirical evidence and emerging macroeconomic analysis shows that gender inequality limits economic growth in developing economies. Research also shows that considerable potential for economic growth could be realized if countries support women's full economic participation. Increases in women's income tend to correlate with greater expenditure on family welfare and children, because women often spend a greater share of their income on their children's nutrition, health care, and education. From an economic perspective, removing gender biases and maintaining a level playing field reduces possible market distortions or malfunctioning. Moreover, promoting women's participation in business may bolster women's overall participation in the labor market, because women-owned businesses are more likely to employ other women. This report analyzes the main reasons for this disparity in the Arab Republic of Egypt and proposes solutions to level the playing field and enable women's full economic contributions. The Investment Climate Survey (ICS) of 1,156 enterprises from the manufacturing sector was carried out in October 2008, using the World Bank standard methodology. The recall questionnaire of 566 enterprises was conducted in October 2008. The gender workers module was conducted in August 2005. It sampled about 15 full-time workers from each firm covered by the ICS recall survey. About 70 percent of the ICS sample is made up of small and medium firms, about 85 percent of which are owned by individuals or families. Large firms employing more than 150 workers account for about 30 percent of the sample. In about 35 percent of the sample, a woman is a main shareholder; in 15 percent of these firms, women own the majority of the firm.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherWorld Bank
dc.relation.ispartofDirections in Development ; private sector
dc.rightshttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/
dc.subjectSMALL ENTERPRISES
dc.subjectSAVINGS ACCOUNTS
dc.subjectJUDGE
dc.subjectLABOR LAW
dc.subjectGENDER GAP
dc.subjectNUTRITION
dc.subjectWIFE
dc.subjectPRIVATIZATION
dc.subjectUNION
dc.subjectCOLLATERAL REQUIREMENTS
dc.subjectWOMEN IN SOCIETY
dc.subjectGENDER
dc.subjectFEMALE LABOR FORCE
dc.subjectLIMITED ACCESS
dc.subjectMICROCREDIT
dc.subjectLOAN APPLICATION
dc.subjectPROVISION OF CREDIT
dc.subjectECONOMIC ACTIVITIES
dc.subjectMARKET ECONOMY
dc.subjectDISCRIMINATION
dc.subjectFEMALES
dc.subjectOPPORTUNITIES FOR WOMEN
dc.subjectSEX
dc.subjectGENDER EQUALITY
dc.subjectLABOR FORCE PARTICIPATION
dc.subjectMARRIED WOMEN
dc.subjectHOUSEHOLDS
dc.subjectFEMALE EMPLOYEES
dc.subjectPROVISION OF FINANCE
dc.subjectLEGAL STATUS
dc.subjectWOMEN EMPLOYEES
dc.subjectBREADWINNER
dc.subjectGENDER DIMENSION
dc.subjectCHECKING ACCOUNTS
dc.subjectFORMS OF DISCRIMINATION
dc.subjectGENDER BARRIERS
dc.subjectECONOMIC ACTIVITY
dc.subjectECONOMIC EMPOWERMENT
dc.subjectWOMEN WORKERS
dc.subjectSTART-UP
dc.subjectLOAN-TO-DEPOSIT RATIO
dc.subjectGENDER MAINSTREAMING
dc.subjectGENDER INEQUALITIES
dc.subjectBREADWINNERS
dc.subjectGENDER CHARACTERISTICS
dc.subjectCREDIT PROVISION
dc.subjectINTERNATIONAL BANK
dc.subjectECONOMIC CONTRIBUTION
dc.subjectDIVORCE
dc.subjectCULTURAL NORMS
dc.subjectUNEMPLOYED WOMEN
dc.subjectLABOR FORCE SURVEYS
dc.subjectWILL
dc.subjectGREATER ACCESS
dc.subjectPROFITABILITY
dc.subjectCOLLATERAL
dc.subjectPEACE
dc.subjectFINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS
dc.subjectCOMPENSATION
dc.subjectMATERNITY LEAVE
dc.subjectBANK ACCOUNT
dc.subjectPROFESSIONAL WOMEN
dc.subjectCAPITAL STOCK
dc.subjectFINANCIAL SECTOR REFORM
dc.subjectTRADE UNIONS
dc.subjectDEPOSIT
dc.subjectFINANCIAL DEVELOPMENT
dc.subjectUNITED NATIONS DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMME
dc.subjectCUSTOM
dc.subjectKEY CHALLENGE
dc.subjectEQUAL PAY
dc.subjectWOMAN
dc.subjectCHAMBER OF COMMERCE
dc.subjectLOAN
dc.subjectSINGLE WOMAN
dc.subjectSOCIAL CHANGE
dc.subjectREPRESENTATION OF WOMEN
dc.subjectSAFETY NETS
dc.subjectBUSINESSWOMEN
dc.subjectEMPLOYER
dc.subjectSOCIAL INSURANCE
dc.subjectLABOR MARKET
dc.subjectDOMINANCE
dc.subjectWOMEN MANAGERS
dc.subjectPREJUDICE
dc.subjectEDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT
dc.subjectPRIVATE SECTOR BANKS
dc.subjectDEMOGRAPHIC CHARACTERISTICS
dc.subjectLAWS
dc.subjectNATIONAL COUNCIL FOR WOMEN
dc.subjectPRIVATE CREDIT
dc.subjectPOOR WOMEN
dc.subjectFEMALE ENTREPRENEURS
dc.subjectHOUSEHOLD CHORES
dc.subjectGROUPS OF WOMEN
dc.subjectGIRLS
dc.subjectWOMEN IN BUSINESS
dc.subjectE-LEARNING
dc.subjectEXPENDITURES
dc.subjectFEMALE LABOR
dc.subjectGENDER INEQUALITY
dc.subjectGENDER DIFFERENCES
dc.subjectHUMAN CAPITAL
dc.subjectFEMALE
dc.subjectFEMALE EDUCATION
dc.subjectGENDER EQUITY
dc.subjectGENDER GAPS
dc.subjectECONOMIC OPPORTUNITIES
dc.subjectACCESS TO FINANCE
dc.subjectPROPORTION OF WOMEN
dc.subjectPRODUCTIVITY
dc.subjectABSENCE OF WOMEN
dc.subjectFINANCIAL SERVICES
dc.subjectNEEDS OF WOMEN
dc.subjectWORKING WOMEN
dc.subjectMICRO-ENTERPRISES
dc.subjectECONOMIC CONTRIBUTIONS
dc.subjectCREDIT INFORMATION SYSTEMS
dc.subjectFORMAL ECONOMY
dc.subjectPRIVATE INVESTMENT
dc.subjectINVESTMENT PLANS
dc.subjectMARRIED MALE
dc.subjectCUSTODY
dc.subjectGENDER SPECIALIST
dc.subjectGENDER SEGREGATION
dc.subjectGENDER COMPOSITION
dc.subjectLOAN APPLICATION PROCEDURES
dc.subjectFOREIGN FIRMS
dc.subjectRURAL WOMEN
dc.subjectUNITED NATIONS
dc.subjectMATERNITY BENEFITS
dc.subjectROLE OF WOMEN
dc.subjectHUMAN RIGHTS
dc.subjectBUSINESS EDUCATION
dc.subjectBARRIERS TO WOMEN
dc.subjectREGULATORY ENVIRONMENT FOR WOMEN
dc.subjectCOURTS
dc.subjectUNMARRIED WOMEN
dc.subjectCHILD CARE
dc.subjectEMPOWERMENT OF WOMEN
dc.subjectECONOMIC RESOURCES
dc.subjectEXPENDITURE
dc.subjectFINANCIAL INTERMEDIARIES
dc.subjectGENDER BIASES
dc.subjectUNSKILLED WOMEN
dc.subjectACCESS TO TRAINING
dc.subjectRESERVE REQUIREMENTS
dc.subjectSAVINGS
dc.subjectBANKING SYSTEM
dc.subjectEQUAL OPPORTUNITY
dc.subjectINCOME-GENERATING ACTIVITIES
dc.subjectFAMILY OBLIGATIONS
dc.subjectPERCEPTIONS OF WOMEN
dc.subjectACCESS TO LAND
dc.subjectWAGE GAP
dc.subjectACCESS TO MARKETS
dc.subjectWOMEN ENTREPRENEURS
dc.subjectDISCRIMINATORY PRACTICES
dc.subjectFEMALE ENTERPRISES
dc.subjectECONOMIC GROWTH
dc.subjectBUSINESS ASSOCIATIONS
dc.subjectFEMALE RESPONDENTS
dc.subjectLABOR MARKETS
dc.subjectDISCRIMINATION AGAINST WOMEN
dc.subjectFAMILY INCOME
dc.subjectECONOMIC REFORMS
dc.subjectFAMILY COURT
dc.subjectINFORMAL WORKERS
dc.subjectJOB SECURITY
dc.subjectSEX SEGREGATION
dc.subjectSMALL ENTERPRISE
dc.subjectBUSINESS MANAGEMENT
dc.subjectBUSINESS OWNER
dc.subjectFINANCIAL EXCLUSION
dc.subjectEQUITABLE ACCESS
dc.subjectHOME
dc.subjectPERCEPTIONS OF GENDER
dc.subjectCAPACITY BUILDING
dc.subjectUNEMPLOYMENT
dc.subjectCORRUPTION
dc.subjectPARTICIPATION OF WOMEN
dc.subjectFEMALE ENTREPRENEURSHIP
dc.subjectFAMILY WELFARE
dc.subjectDAYCARE
dc.subjectLACK OF ACCESS
dc.subjectFEMALE LABOR FORCE PARTICIPATION
dc.subjectFEMALE WORKERS
dc.subjectBUSINESS WOMEN
dc.subjectEDUCATED WOMEN
dc.subjectFAMILY RESPONSIBILITIES
dc.subjectBUSINESS SUCCESS
dc.subjectOPEN MARKET
dc.subjectEMPLOYERS
dc.subjectGENDER ACTION
dc.subjectCREDIT INFORMATION
dc.subjectURBAN AREAS
dc.subjectIMMIGRATION
dc.subjectFINANCE ACCESS
dc.subjectUNDP
dc.subjectBANKS
dc.subjectFEMALE EMPLOYMENT
dc.subjectEQUALITY OF OPPORTUNITY
dc.subjectEARNINGS
dc.subjectECONOMIC CRISIS
dc.subjectEMPLOYMENT GROWTH
dc.subjectLEGISLATION
dc.subjectWORKING CAPITAL
dc.subjectURBAN DEVELOPMENT
dc.subjectUNSKILLED WORKERS
dc.subjectWIVES
dc.subjectENTERPRISE DEVELOPMENT
dc.subjectMICROFINANCE
dc.subjectLABOR FORCE
dc.subjectSINGLE WOMEN
dc.subjectENTREPRENEURS
dc.subjectEMPLOYMENT OF WOMEN
dc.subjectMAINSTREAMING GENDER
dc.subjectEQUITY CAPITAL
dc.subjectGENDER DISPARITIES
dc.subjectINFORMAL SECTOR
dc.subjectCAPITAL REQUIREMENT
dc.subjectSOCIAL FUND
dc.subjectFAMILIES
dc.subjectHUSBAND
dc.titleEgyptian Women Workers and Entrepreneurs : Maximizing Opportunities in the Economic Sphere
ge.collectioncodeEC
ge.collectioncodeFE
ge.dataimportlabelOAI metadata object
ge.identifier.legacyglobethics:5457283
ge.identifier.permalinkhttps://www.globethics.net/gel/5457283
ge.lastmodificationdate2014-01-06 14:09
ge.submissions0
ge.oai.exportid53
ge.oai.repositoryid7552
ge.oai.setnameDirections in Development
ge.oai.setspechdl_10986_2146
ge.oai.streamid1
ge.setnameGlobeEthicsLib
ge.setspecglobeethicslib
ge.linkhttp://hdl.handle.net/10986/2414


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