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dc.contributor.authorDohrn, Jennifer Ellen
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-23T13:49:58Z
dc.date.available2019-09-23T13:49:58Z
dc.date.created2019-05-14 23:34
dc.date.issued2005-01-01
dc.identifieroai:aquila.usm.edu:ojhe-1014
dc.identifierhttps://aquila.usm.edu/ojhe/vol2/iss1/2
dc.identifierhttps://aquila.usm.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1014&context=ojhe
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12424/50044
dc.description.abstractAs standards develop to reduce the maternal-to-child transmission of HIV, healthcare professionals need to evaluate recommendations in the context of culturally-accepted values for the populations to be served. Breastfeeding, a central value in South African families, carries the risk of transmission in mothers that are HIV+. A dilemma faced by international workers is the sharing of information that challenges culturally-accepted practices. A nurse-midwife working with HIV positive women during the childbearing cycle in the United States is expected to implement protocols to prevent transmission of the HIV virus to the newborn. These include administration of antiretroviral medications to the women during the pregnancy and labor, as well as the policy of no breastfeeding, since breast milk contains the HIV virus and can be a source of passing the infection to the baby. Ethical dilemmas develop when the nurse-midwife is an international worker in a country which is in the midst of the HIV epidemic such as South Africa. Current South African policy regarding mother-to-child transmission recommends either exclusive breastfeeding with rapid weaning at six months, or exclusive bottle feeding. Cultural practice favors breastfeeding with the addition of cereals, in effect, mixed feeding. These practices lead to a high risk of transmission and infection in the newborn.
dc.format.mediumapplication/pdf
dc.publisherThe Aquila Digital Community
dc.sourceOnline Journal of Health Ethics
dc.subjectNurse Midwives
dc.subjectHIV Virus
dc.subjectSouth Africa
dc.subjectBreastfeeding
dc.subjectAutonomy
dc.titleBreastfeeding in the HIV Epidemic: A Midwife's Dilemma in International Work
dc.typetext
ge.collectioncode1551-4218
ge.dataimportlabelOAI metadata object
ge.identifier.legacyglobethics:16194378
ge.identifier.permalinkhttps://www.globethics.net/gel/16194378
ge.lastmodificationdate2019-05-14 23:34
ge.lastmodificationuseradmin@pointsoftware.ch (import)
ge.submissions0
ge.oai.exportid150119
ge.oai.repositoryid100824
ge.oai.setnameOnline Journal of Health Ethics
ge.oai.setspecpublication:ojhe
ge.oai.streamid2
ge.setnameGlobeEthicsLib
ge.setspecglobeethicslib
ge.linkhttps://aquila.usm.edu/ojhe/vol2/iss1/2
ge.linkhttps://aquila.usm.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1014&context=ojhe


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