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dc.contributor.authorCarroll College, Helena, Montana
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-25T21:07:43Z
dc.date.available2019-09-25T21:07:43Z
dc.date.created2013-11-05 19:43
dc.date.issued2012
dc.identifieroai:cdm15018.contentdm.oclc.org:p15018coll6/9001
dc.identifierhttp://cdm15018.contentdm.oclc.org/u?/p15018coll6,9001
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12424/503038
dc.description.abstractBi-monthly; irregular
dc.description.abstractTo have fall break or not to have fall break? More importantly, a short break, or the traditional a long break? Since 1989, Carroll has been given one week off in the fall for faculty and students to catch their breath from the chaos of the start of a new academic year, especially freshmen. After thorough research, the Carroll College Policy Committee nalized the decision to have a two-year trial period of a four-day (two school day) fall break, starting in the fall of 2012. “This decision is about you, the stu-dents," said Candace Cain, a policy board member. "It is for your academic, physi-cal, and emotional health.” The fact is that very few colleges nationwide have a nine day fall break. It was a combination of the change and feeling a lack of involvement in the deci-sion process that upset the majority of the campus. An Associated Students of Carroll Col-lege, ASCC, board meeting, held February 12th, was opened up to the student body, where the issue was addressed by Policy Board members Candace Cain, Dr. Kyle Strode, and Dr. Mark Parker. Approxi-mately 10 non-board members were pres-ent to question and seek information about the controversial change. “If students are ‘emotionally drained’ it is going to be that much harder when, re-alistically, many students won’t be able to even go home over that four day break,” said Emily Dean, a sophomore history and international relations major from Butte. During the discussion, reasons for this seemingly immediate change arose. Although to the students and many of the faculty the decision seemed to have come from out of nowhere; however, Dr. Parker admitted that the Policy Board has been discussing this change for about six years. Positive responses to the new schedule include a later start of fall semester and longer winter break. This is not only bene cial to students who may save money on travel during fall break, it will also open doors of op-portunity to travel abroad over winter. It will also bene t the registration of ce, allowing them to catch up on grading and registering new students. When questioned about the break in communication, Cain assured, “We do We’ve all noticed the tuition hikes: one, two, three, even four thousand dollars in some years. You may not, however, be aware that your Carroll scholarship is not changing to t the higher bill. Carroll awards merit-based scholar-ships to all incoming freshmen who meet the criteria. These scholarships are the Presidential, the Trustee, the All Saints, and the Founders. Nearly all of us have seen one of these names followed by some nice zeros on our nancial aid letters. Unbeknownst to most students, the dol-lar amount of these scholarships increases each year in accordance with the tuition: but only for incoming freshmen. We come to Carroll at that year’s cost, with that year’s scholarship, only to have to pay more and more in the coming years. Granted, we were all freshmen at one point. We’ve all enjoyed the higher schol-arship. But is it fair that we only bene t from an increased scholarship once in our four years here at Carroll? The average increase in merit scholarships is at least $1,500. If we all got this increase, it could make a big difference when it comes down to having higher loans or picking up that third job just to get by. “My parents help out with my tuition, but I still have two jobs during the school year just to get by,” said Kathleen Law-rence, a sophomore elementary education major from Pleasanton, Calif. In an attempt to interview a member of the nancial aid staff about students’ ques-tions regarding tuition vs. scholarships, I was told they had a stock letter prepared for such questions. When the stock letter email came, it was a bunch of PR mumbo-jumbo that answered only one of the questions I had intended to ask. The letter stated that, “Each entering class’s merit levels are determined based on comparable criteria and each student is locked into his or her merit level.” Locked in. Well, great to know, but why? Apparently, once a student reaches sophomore standing, they are able to increase the amount borrowed on their student loans. We’re allowed $3,500 as a freshman, $4,500 as sophomores and juniors, and $5,500 as a senior. That’s not fooling anyone. We know the difference between free money (scholar-ships) and life-time debt (student loans). If the average merit scholarship increase is $1,500, that’s an approximate $4,500 in loans that we wouldn’t have if the college increased our scholarships annually. Not to mention, as Alexandra Mandala points out, Carroll recently received a rather large monetary endowment. “I don’t get why they can’t increase scholarships, especially after we just got that huge donation,” Mandala said. “Carroll works hard to get students here, but not hard enough to keep them here.” Mandala is a sophomore anthrozoology major from Orange County, Calif. Granted, it does no good to just com-plain: we have to offer solutions. The rst solution might come from the “merit” aspect of Carroll’s scholarships. “It’s one thing for Carroll to raise tuition (once we’ve already fallen in love with the school and won’t leave) but it’s not fair for them to keep our scholarships the same when we work really hard for our grades,” said Kenisha Himsl, a sophomore math for secondary education major from Kalispell. The Prospector Carroll College Student Newspaper Helena, Montana Volume 98 Edition 4 March 1, 2012 Sodexo vs. Pizza Hut The local Pizza Hut deliveryman faces a serious reduction in tips this football season as students across campus are forced to use personal funds to pay for meals. Pizza Hut is not happy about Carroll’s new Flex Policy and neither are the students. As a result of this new policy, Pizza Hut was forced into a “15 to 9” slim down leaving many people without jobs. As a result of a recent decision by Sodexo food of cials, students will no longer be able to use their ex dollars at Helena area restaurants such as Pizza Hut. Many students are upset about the changes and concerned about the lack of exibility the new meal plans offer. “I’m not sure what prompted this decision,” said Pete Markuson, a senior from Miles City, Mont. majoring in business administration. “I know one thing though I really miss having those options.” Students like Pete were not the only ones affected by the decision. Many students depended on the use of ex dollars for an easy meal when Sodexo services were unavailable. However, Carroll students weren’t the only ones affected by this brash decision. Hard working community members have taken a big hit as decreased revenues force merchants to cut back. “On an average night a year ago I would’ve had 15 people working, today I’m lucky if I can afford to staff nine,” said Kelly Simoneau, Pizza Hut general manager. “Losing that revenue has translated to less jobs and less hours for hardworking people.” While Sodexo’s commitment to innovation is admirable, the newly instituted Saints Cash program remains a thinly veiled disguise for a widely controversial decision. After such an unfavorable reaction by the student body I was forced to ask the obvious question. Why the change? Saints Cash was instituted early this fall as part of a series of summer renovations intended to provide more options for students; however, many students feel as though it’s been counterproductive. “My ex dollars are basically worthless,” said Arron Lenk, a senior from Graham, Wash. majoring in sociology. “It’s pretty tough to use up $200 on coffee and sandwiches.” So while Sodexo continues to bene t from added revenue, students and the local economy are suffering. Saints Cash is simply not an adequate replacement. If I wanted to spend my own money I would just use my debit card. Sodexo shouldn’t be in the credit business and students don’t need another debit card. We need variety. We need reliable after-hours options and hardworking Helena residents need their jobs back. We need our ex dollars back. Elevate Documentary fi lm p. 13 A Documentary lm from West Africa Mark Semmens p. 9 Continues on a family legacy at Carroll Fall Break p. 5 Students share their frustration Basketball page 11 PHOTO BY GARY MARSHALL More Scholarships page 3 The real "merit" behind Carroll scholarships Chris Puyear Student Opinion INSIDE More Fall Break page 5 “Unfortunately, we had a break in communication line.” -Candace Cain Marcie McCarvel Lead Writer Student opinion SARAH MALINAK Fall Break An end to the tradition? Editors' Corner: Courtney Jones & Mary Currin 2 The Prospector Thursday, March 1, 2012 Editors in Chief Courtney Jones Mary Currin Faculty Adviser Brent Northup Editorial/Design Wayne Klinkel Lacey Middlestead Layout/Design Emily Madieros Maggie Gordon Advertising Joe King Photographer Gary Marshall Marcie McCarvel Lead Writer Staff Writers Emily Halvorson Erin Johnson Brittany Goltry Nathan Kavanagh Dana Miller Sarah Malinak Brandon A. Saiki Chris Puyear Reed Baker Aimee Ciez Sarah Malinak Kimberly Wiggs Jon Men Carly Garrison Byago Diouf The Prospector Jibber Jabber "Everyone likes summer. Sounds great." - John Ortman, sophomore, nursing, Couer d’ Alene, Idaho “Fall break is very needed to catch your breath after the life-changing experience of college.” -Devan Hromcik freshman, nursing, Clancy, Mont. "I need my fall break to be as long as possible. During fall break, I can sleep in as long as I want. During the summer, I don't get to.”" -Alexandra Mandala sophomore, anthrozoology, Orange County, Calif. "I would prefer a fall break, but I could also live with a late start to school.” --Jake Harbolt, senior, history, Tiger, Ore. “I like the way it is set up now. I enjoy my fall break way too much to see it go.” -Eric Blake, sophomore, nursing, Geneva, Ill. "A longer summer sounds grand, but I look forward to the week break in the fall in which I go home.” -Stephanie Johnson, junior, health science, Beaverton, Ore. “I don’t care. I’m a senior, so take that underclassmen.” -Garrett Barnes senior, engineering, Kennewick, Wash. “Fall break is es-sential to my sanity. It's a time to recover from the stress of starting a new year. A full week is needed.” -Elizabeth Henderson junior, nursing, Billings. Well, the unthinkable became a reality at Carroll a couple of weeks ago—fall break was cancelled. Excuse me, I should rephrase it to t the Policy Committee’s lingo, “It has been shortened.” Well, going from a ve-day break off of school to a two-day break is not really a break. Again, excuse me, it is actually four days, if you count the weekend that we are already guaranteed. I am deeply disappointed by this decision, along with what appears to be the majority of Carroll students. The way that this was decided was unfair and did not take into account the opinions of students and staff. I know this is true because I never received an invitation to a forum or discussion as a student to talk about this and I have heard from faculty in several depart-ments that they were not given a voice in the matter either. At the ASCC meeting, members of the Policy Com-mittee stated that there was room for a student representative on the board this year. ASCC came back with the fact that they never received an invitation to send a student. Clearly a huge breach in communication!!! The response was, “We will look into that.” Actually, that seemed to be a common response throughout the meeting. Students asked, “Will we have to pay more for the dorms next year due to extra time we will be there over our would-be break?” The commit-tee responded that they “Did not think of that, but would look into it.” They followed this comment with the fact that we “Probably won’t notice a price increase anyway since it goes up every year.” The committee wanted to make it clear that they want to help us save on our plane tickets and other travel costs. Well, this brings me to my next point, which is the fact that they did not seem to consider the students from Portland, Seattle, and other areas more than a half-day drive, that now these students probably will have to stay at school un-til Christmas. “Fall Break” is now too short to y home for most, and Thanks-giving is only a couple weeks from our long break, so it seems that most will just stick it out the extra couple weeks before going home. This seems very sad. And, if retention truly was a factor in this decision, then it seems Carroll’s “committee” may have jeopardized that even more by making even more students homesick and not wanting to come back. Not to mention the fact that "The length of fall break is a nice break from the hecticness of school. Due to this, I am okay with losing time from summer in order to take that break from our busy college lifestyle.” --Eric Bond sophomore, history, Portland, Ore. “If that happens I'm not coming back! Oh wait...I'm gradu-ating in May." -Lauren Cacopardo senior, nursing, Boise, Idaho. CARTOON BY AMY DIXON What are your thoughts about the changes with fall break? "I like fi nishing school before my friends." -Chris McGrath sophomore, sports management & business administration, Everett, Wash. Opinions "I'm always ready to go to Carroll at the end of summer and because I know it helps the freshmen to have a fall break." -Paul Stepanek theology, junior, Billings. More Editors' page 2 Thursday, March 1, 2012 The Prospector 3 Fun weekend and still have a lot of homework? Yes. Would coffee help? Too bad, there is none. At the beginning of the school year, Carroll College added a great new service for its students. The on-campus coffee shop, Jazzman’s Cafe & Bakery, opened to provide students an option to get coffee before and between classes. However, this wonderful addition has a minor problem with its hours. Jazzman’s Cafe & Bakery should be open on the weekends for students to enjoy coffee on Sunday mornings or when they stay up late for a night of homework. The hours of operation are insuf cient to accommodate the needs of students. Most students who live on campus want coffee on their weekends, especially on Sundays when faced with a lot of homework after a long weekend of fun. “The hours are bad. They should be open all weekend,” said Blake DeShaw, a sophomore international business major from Plentywood, Mont. A lot of students rely on ex dollars for their food purchases. If the cafe doesn’t stay open on Sundays, there should be other options. “They could at least leave out drip coffee for the students,” said Colleen Behrens, a sophomore nursing major from Corvallis, Ore. This may not seem practical, but it’s an option the school could consider. “I know there are plenty of students that need a work study job and would be willing to be a barista during the weekend,” said Behrens. Weekends could provide more jobs for students who need the money. The students aren’t asking for it to be open 24/7. The weekend hours should be “from 10 a.m. to noon and 4 p.m. to 8 p.m.,” said Haleigh Peterson, a sophomore nursing major from Helena. This way the cafe closes before mass on Sundays, but is still open during crucial hours for coffee. “Maybe I would get that extra studying in if I had that cup of coffee,” said DeShaw. Caffeine on campus What are you doing over Spring Break? "Cow tippin in Valier." - Demi O' Neal, freshman, biol-ogy, Valier, Mont. "Hitting up Portland with friends and seeing the girl." -Connor Albertson, sophomore, pathology, Bozeman. "Maxing and relaxing in Kennewick." -Sarah Miller, junior, health sci-ence, Kennewick,Wash. "Gettin back to Seattle soon, mediocre sports teams and plenty of rain...oh yeah..." -Nicholas Jenkins, sopho-more, computer science, Bellevue,Wash. Student Voices Himsl makes an interesting point: we do work hard for our grades. What if merit scholarships continued to be locked in, in general, but could go up to the higher amount for students who show that they excel academically here at Carroll? After all, as it stands now merit-based aid is calculated from high school GPA, not college. If merit scholarships could increase to the new, higher, amount each year based on if students meet a 3.5 or higher GPA, that might be an acceptable compromise to the nancial aid department. It would certainly show that Carroll appreciates and rewards academic excellence and would probably raise grades at the same time. If that isn’t feasible, Kasey Panther of-fers a different solution: “If they can’t raise merit scholarships for tuition increases, they could at least offer some sort of additional scholar-ship for good grades, like if we make the Dean’s List several semesters in a row,” said Panther, a senior health science major from Liberty Lake, Wash. An interesting alternative. Offer stu-dents the opportunity to receive extra aid (in a different way) by excelling in their classes and maintaining a high GPA. If Carroll offers us the right motivation, we’ll make this school look even better than it already is. Scholarships from front page Opinions if you even are semi-responsible and plan ahead to book your ticket prior to a couple weeks before, you will end up paying about the same. One point reiterated over and over again during the meeting was the fact that the Policy Committee is for “us,” the students. However, nearly everything regarding this issue seems to go against that state-ment. If the committee truly was for “us,” then they should have pursued getting a student to join the committee, there should have been a forum to discuss this, or a poll taken. The bottom line is that they should have allowed for “our” voices to be heard before making the nal decision. Its mind boggling to think that Carroll cares about who we as students want as our next president, yet they didn’t even bother to ask for our input on an issue that, for some students, may be more monumental. All that we ask for as students at this institution is a voice and we have been greatly let down. You don’t pay our tuition and you don’t buy our tickets. Maybe this would have gone through anyway, but at least we would not be able to feel disgust over the fact that we were completely gypped in this matter. There is no better way to demonstrate to your stu-dents that you value us less than by doing what you just did. Editors' from page 2 Student opinion KIMBERLY WIGGS 4 The Prospector Thursday, March 1, 2012 Carroll College’s equestrian club took off Friday, Feb. 10 to compete in Logan, Utah, taking with them six of their nine members. Though small, Carroll’s team won a urry of awards, including at least six rst place ribbons. The team, which is in its third year, consists of nine of Carroll’s most enthusiastic equestrian students, travelling across the country to participate in equestrian competitions, sponsored by the Intercollegiate Horse Show Association. Competitors can compete in a range of events, from trotting to jumping. One interesting thing to note: competitors are not riding horses that they are familiar with: they are provided horses by the school hosting the competition. “It can be a bit nervewracking at times, but you learn how to ride a variety of horses,” said Mikayla Schroeder, junior biology and anthrozology major of Franktown, Colo., and president of Carroll College’s team. “At a western show you are generally competing in western pleasure unless you are at the highest level. At that level, you will compete in reining, a level where you perform individual patterns that include slide stops, spins and lead changes.” The team is coached by Maddie Ross, and the next meet is English Regionals in Logan, Utah March 10-11. For more information or to join the club, contact Mikayla Schroeder at mschroeder@ carroll.edu or by phone at (720)273-5222. You can also check out their website at ccequestrians.webs.com or visit them on facebook at, Carroll Equestrians! Jon Men Staff Writer Equestrian Club competes Charlies heaters have mood swings I wake up in the middle of the night dripping in sweat and gasping for water. I sit up, wander over to the window, and pull it open, letting freezing air spill into the room. When I glance at the thermometer on my wall, it reads 85 degrees. Yet, when I check my thermostat, it is clearly positioned to “off.” This is common in St. Charles’ Hall. Students nd that temperatures in their rooms either soar or plummet, depending upon the apparent mood of the heaters on any given day. “The heat in my room is very annoying, especially when the wind changes directions and I can’t cool it down.” said Kaitlyn Cummings, sophomore communications major. “Occasionally, I’ve had to sleep somewhere else because of the heat.” The question remains amongst these students: “Why can’t we control our heat?” The answer might be surprising to some. Scott Forthofer, the resident director of St. Charles Hall, assures students that these problems may be solved much easier than they think. “It is a steam heating system,” said Forthofer when questioned about these problems. “It takes time for that steam to regulate itself, and sometimes that system can run into issues, such as steam traps, making certain rooms hotter.” However, problems with high temperatures may simply be the result of an old system rather than a broken thermostat. “Temperatures outside change,” explained Forthofer. “Sometimes the system in the building can’t keep up with that change, which makes the temperatures inside seem extreme.” So, I’ll ask the obvious question: “Why not simply x the heat?” “St. Charles is an old building, and the heating system is very old,” said Forthofer. “To change it right now would be an ungodly amount of money.” So once again, a signi cant problem amongst students at Carroll is simply chalked up as “un xable” due to cost. While I understand the predicament of the school, I am not sinking myself into debt paying for my education in order to live in a room that malfunctions on a daily basis. However, it seems that I am doomed to restless nights of opening and closing windows, dehydration, and chills until my time in St. Charles is over. PHOTO COURTESY OF MIKAYLA SCHROEDER Essay Contest Father Butko Awards in Freshman Writing Students and parents alike enjoyed the comedic presence of funnyman Johnny Cardinale on February 24. “He was hilarious,” said sophomore psychology major Rayme McKelvey. “The jokes he made about music were true and funny.” The event, put on by Carroll Student Activities (CSA), was a huge success, according to Scott Forthofer, the club’s adviser. “It went very well,” he said backstage after the show. “A lot of people showed up. We’re estimating over 200. We had to bring out extra chairs to add to our original 200, and there were people sitting on tables and in armchairs in the back.” Cardinale, who has made appearances on both “Jimmy Kimmel Live” and “Chelsea Lately,” has much experience in performing, and his expertise was obvious to the crowd. “He connected well with the audience,” said sophomore business administration major Nikole Drummond. “I’m excited to have had him here. We saw him at NACA West, and decided he was a good t for Carroll. It was decided early that Cardinale would be the entertainment for Parents’ Weekend, with jokes geared towards a diverse audience. Forthofer agreed enthusiastically: “His set was very well gauged to all ages.” Engineering major and St. Charles community adviser, Tyler Wahl, was entertained as well: “It was good and funny,” said the sophomore after the show. “I stroked my beard a couple of times.” Overall, the show was a success for CSA. “It went great,” said club member Devon Bathon, a sophomore computer science major. “Everyone seemed to enjoy it, and they were all laughing their butts off.” Cardinale ended his show with a stroke of his guitar, a prop for many of his jokes, and left the audience with split sides and wet eyes. Comedian Johnny Cardinale Dana Miller Staff Writer Campus This competition encourages and recognizes top-quality writing from the Composition Program. Eligibility The contest is open to all students enrolled in ENWR 101/ENWR 102 during the 2011 - 2012 academic year. Prizes Up to ve scholarships, valued at $250 each, will be awarded to the students submitting winning essays. Application All entries must be submitted, along with a completed submis-sion form, to the Academic Dean’s Of ce in O’Connell Hall by 4 p.m. on Friday, March 23th. Entry due no later than 4 p.m. March 23, 2012 Academic Dean’s Of ce O’Connell Hall Student opinion DANA MILLER Mikayla Schroeder, Jared Engels, and Erin Reynolds The Prospector 5 Campus Thursday, March 1, 2012 PHOTO BY GARY MARSHALL S.T.A.C. hours Carroll dining services cater to those on certain schedules; many students miss meals because of con icts with the dining hours, forcing them to go hungry or nd food elsewhere. “Our schedules aren’t like that every-day,” said Maggie Gordon, a senior com-munications major from Polson, Mont. Breakfast begins at 10:30 a.m. on week-ends. Dinner ends at 7 p.m. on weeknights and even earlier on weekends. Students aren’t happy Aimee Ciez argues, “I get out of class at 7 p.m., and I get no dinner.” Ciez is a sophomore public relations major from Seattle who is dependent on the dining services for her meals. “I don’t eat dinner very often,” Ciez said. When asked how she felt about the situation she joked, “Hungry.” Many students are broke and rely mostly on their meal plans, so to have to wait for breakfast, miss dinner because of a night class, or to delay plans around the cafeteria’s schedule seems ridiculous and should never happen. A group of students and I were planning to meet at the cafeteria one Saturday to go over a project while eating breakfast, but the facility was not open. We were forced to nd food elsewhere. Luckily, one of us had a car, if not we would have been stranded and hungry. “The mornings of the weekends should be open at least by 9,” said Sean Smith, a sophomore health and physical educa-tion major from Alpine, Wyo. “No more brunches.” If the cafeteria does not want to stay open later or open early for meals, there should be other options for students who are hungry. There are alternatives to eating in the cafeteria, but even then, the hours are not student-friendly. “The café is never open,” said Ali Mildenberger, a junior communications major from Hamilton, Mont. “They should be open all day for students. Ev-eryone is on a different schedule.” “We are not going to open an entire meal for 12 students,” said Linda Bahr the dining services general manager. Bahr mentioned that the ASCC has worked with her to experiment with traf- c ow in order to accommodate to the students. When students have concerns, they have a place to direct them. “Be nice about your requests,” said Bahr. "If the concern has validity the cafeteria may consider it." want your voice. It is very important to us. Unfortunately, we had a break in the communication line.” In order to bridge the gap of commu-nication between department chairs and students, the policy committee has room to place a couple of student representa-tives on the board. “ASCC is looking to open up our lines of communication with the administra-tion in the future,” said Vicki Dettman, a senior biology major and ASCC president from Bozeman. As stated by interim Vice President, Dr. Paula McNutt, in an email addressed to the students about the concern over fall break, “the world of the 21st century is an ever-changing, dynamic place, where success requires us to be exible and adaptable. This is a vital point for us to keep in mind, for our students, for faculty and staff, and for Carroll College as an institution.” It goes without saying that much of the campus is upset and disappointed in the change of their desired schedule and lack of communication. The board and members of the staff ask that students remember that these two years will be run on a "trial basis." “We will work hard to take objective measures on what is best for students, regarding the trial period,” Cain said. So the question was never whether or not fall break was taken away, it was the length of time given; only the trial period can determine its permanence. “Even though they knew it wouldn’t make us immediately happy, the change is happening to better Carroll,” Dettman said. With any questions or suggestions about the miscommunication or new schedule, students are asked to contact Vicki Dett-man on behalf of ASCC at Vdettman@ carroll.edu. Every year, about eight weeks into the semester, Carroll students enjoy the welcoming embrace of fall break. On Tuesday, February 7, however, fall break took a hit when Carroll’s policy committee passed that the break had been reduced to only Monday and Tuesday of that week, to take action fall semester of 2012. “The policy committee is looking to alter the academic calendar mainly because of student progress and retention rates,” said Registrar Catherine Day. “Especially freshmen seem to struggle with having a long break so early in the year.” With the shortening of fall break seeming to fall on the freshmen, I think the main question that needs to be asked as to whether the break is causing the slipping of grades early in their rst semester, or if they simply are not used to studying in a college environment. “[Fall break] is important because it gives you a time to recharge,” said Caitlin Rock, a sophomore secondary education major from White Sulphur Springs, Mont. “It’s more important than spring break because after three months of doing nothing academic, trying to go without that break seems overwhelming.” With obvious student skepticism towards the change, the most astounding part regarding this change was that it was done behind closed doors; students and staff were not informed of the shortening of break formally until it had already been approved by Interim Vice President of Academic Affairs Mark Parker, and Interim President Paula McNutt. “Change is dif cult,” said Day. “Students enjoy fall break, and staff enjoy it too, but in a couple of years, it won’t really make a difference because the new students won’t have ever had fall break.” While the ASCC meeting on Sunday, February 12 was dedicated to addressing the change, many students feel undermined by this decision, especially by the sneakiness displayed by those in charge of passing it. “I'm really not a fan of how the administration handled breaking the news to [the students],” said Nicholas Jenkins, a sophomore computer science major from Bellevue, Wash. “They relied on an ineffective trickle down effect which relied on the teachers informing the students, which we all know didn’t work out.” As the dust settles after the decision was approved, students are coming to terms with the fact that they didn’t really have a say in the process, but are still disgruntled about the decision. “I would like the administration to at least admit that this whole thing is a big mess,” said Jenkins. “And they should really consider reversing their changes.” Student outrage erupts “Fall break is important because it gives you a time to recharge.” - Caitlin Rock Loss of fall break Fall Break from front page Student opinion REED BAKER Student opinion CARLY GARRISON Interested in having a unique meal? Tired of eating on campus for lunch or dinner? Craving Chinese food, but inca-pable of making it yourself? Then trying out Helena’s nest Chinese cuisine at Jade Garden is your best bet for a great meal. Jade Garden has been located in Helena for a number of years. Since December 1995, Jade Gar-den has been a go-to restaurant for a delicious lunch or dinner. Jade Garden’s fantastic cuisine has been acknowledged recently, receiving the Top 100 Chinese Restaurants in America award for overall excellence. At Jade Garden, you have the option of ordering for take-out or enjoying a meal inside. And with an extensive menu, Jade Garden is sure to have something to please everyone. The typical dishes are offered at Jade Garden, such as orange and teriyaki chicken, chicken fried rice, and wonton soup. Jade Garden’s impressive menu also offers their signature dishes, such as the Phoenix Nest, which includes chicken breast and shrimp sautéed with garden greens, or the Walnut Shrimp, which of-fers fried shrimp coated in cream sauce and honey roasted walnuts. The prices of these delectable dishes are relatively affordable. More of the fancier, signature dishes are on the expensive end, but the basic dishes are affordable for a college student’s budget. Signature dishes such as the Phoenix Nest, or the Walnut Shrimp, are priced at $16.25, but cheaper options, such as chicken fried rice are listed as $10.25. Jade Garden also has a plethora of dishes that are perfect for sharing amongst friends and family. Their family style menu offers a range of dishes that are best for sharing amongst a group of people. Their selection of combo plates is ideal for the indecisive customer because these dishes give you a taste of everything for a pretty reasonable price. Jade Garden even has a menu for those who want to be healthier, or are on a diet, and for the vegetarian customer. Dishes such as Buddha's Delight, which offers tofu sautéed with a range of vegetables, like mushrooms, celery, cauli ower, car-rots, snow peas, onions, zucchini, and red bell peppers, is sure to please, especially at a great price of $12.00. The atmosphere of Jade Garden is fam-ily friendly, perfect for a date, or great for enjoying a meal with friends. Cozy booths provide an intimate setting for a date, and wide, circular tables give enough space to bring the whole family or a big group of friends. The staff is friendly and ac-commodating, and they help to provide a fantastic dining experience. Jade Garden is located a few minutes’ drive from Carroll. So next time you are in the mood for some outstanding Chinese food, need a dependable restaurant for a date, or are just in the mood for enjoying an appetizing meal with friends, head over to Jade Garden, which will not disappoint! Campus 6 The Prospector Thursday, March 1, 2012 PHOTO BY GARY MARSHALL Student opinion EMILY HALVORSON Brittany's bite of Jade Garden Jade Garden's unique menu Students of all years and majors are encouraged to contribute. Please contact our staff by sending an email to prospector@carroll.edu. We want YOU to write for The Prospector! Where: Jade Garden 3128 N. Montana Ave. Helena, MT 59601 Phone: (406) 443-8899 What: Wonton Soup, Orange Chicken, and Cantonese Pan-Fried Noodles Why: I love eating at Jade Garden, especially when I go with a group of friends or family, and we all order different dishes and share. The platters are so large that sharing is a great way to taste everything and still have leftovers. I personally like to start my Jade Garden experience with hot tea and sugar. Then I move on to the wonton soup and eggrolls. Next, the delicious fried rice comes out. I never noticed this before, but fried rice reminds me of a carnival. That sinfully-delicious fried-food taste makes me want to ride the Zipper and relax on the Ferris wheel. Now I look forward to fried rice even more than be-fore. Not long after the fried rice arrives, the entrees ll the table. The orange chicken has such a fabulous taste and is just spicy enough. This dish is always one of the favorites of the night and usually ends in a ght over the leftovers. The Cantonese Pan-Fried Noodles have a completely different taste that com-pliments the chicken wonderfully. Noodles, carrots, broccoli, mini corns, and your choice of meat are all mixed together to create this incredible dish. I have to admit, my favorite part about eating at Jade Garden is at the very end when the fortune cookies appear. Fortune cookies are one of the most entertaining desserts. Jade Garden 3128 North Montana Avenue (406) 443-8899 Hours Sunday - Thursday 11 a.m. – 9:30 p.m. Friday- Saturday 11 a.m. – 10 p.m. PHOTO BY GARY MARSHALL Ingredients/Tools: 1. Baking stone 2. Crisco 3. 1 package (18 to 19 ounces) of lemon cake mix 4. 1 egg, slightly beaten 5. 1/3 cup of vegetable oil 6. 2 tablespoons of water 7. 1/3 cup of pecans (optional) Glaze (optional): 1. 1 lemon for zest and juice (or 1-2 tablespoons of lemon juice) 2. ½ cup powdered sugar Instructions: 1. Preheat oven to 375 degrees. 2. DO NOT follow the instructions on the bake of the cake mix box. 3. Combine cake mix, egg, oil, and water in a bowl and stir until thoroughly combined (the mixture will be dry.) 4. I prefer these cookies without pecans, but if you would like to include them, chop them up and stir them into the dough at this time. 5. Shape the dough into small balls (about the size of a tangerine.) 6. Drop the balls of dough onto the greased baking stone about 2 inches apart. 7. Bake for 13 minutes or until lightly browned. 8. Let cool for 3 minutes. Glaze: 1. Remove 1 teaspoon of lemon zest from lemon peel. 2. Collect 1-2 tablespoons of lemon juice from either a real lemon or a pre-squeezed juice. 3. Whisk lemon zest, lemon juice, and powdered sugar together in a small bowl and drizzle the glaze on cooled cookies. Ca m pu s Thursday, March 1, 2012 The Prospector 7 Sunshine Kisses Brittany's "bite of the month" Brittany Goltry Staff Writer Total Prep and Cooking Time: 20 minutes Serving Size: 14-36 cookies Recipe I never dreamed that one day I would be asking my parents for cookware as a Christmas present. Yet sure enough, I asked for a Pampered Chef rectangular baker (cranberry colored) and a large round stone with handles for Christmas this year. It turned out to be one of the best and most practical presents I have ever asked for. To break in my new cookware, I thought I would try something simple and classic: baking cookies! Except these are not just any cookies. After the overload of traditional Christmas cookies—sugar cookies in the shape of stockings, with gobs of red and green frosting on top and a layer of sprinkles—I wanted to go with something fresh for spring. My all-time favorite cookies are actually yellow lemon cookies called Sunshine Kisses. When I left home for college, I brought the recipe for these cookies along with me, which can be found in "The Pampered Chef Busy Mom’s Cookbook." I have de nitely gotten some crap for keeping this cookbook on my bookshelf. But almost every time that I tried to make the cookies by memory, I would end up baking a lemon cake instead of Sunshine Kisses because I missed a very crucial step that you will learn about in the instructions. Thankfully, I don’t actually need the cookbook anymore because I make the cookies so often that I have the recipe memorized. But not very many people know how to make these delicious pick-me-ups. After tasting them, you would not believe how easy and fast they are to whip up. While Sunshine Kisses are fantastic summer cookies, they are also the perfect treat to brighten up any cold, snowy day. Simply looking at these bright yellow cookies is an instant mood lifter, and just wait until you taste them. Tip #1: DO NOT follow the instructions on the back of the cake mix box. For some terrible reason, I always get this recipe confused with another dessert recipe, and I mix up the batter just as the box says. Then I realize that something went wrong when the consistency is much too diluted for cookie dough. There are smaller quantities of ingredients for the cookies, so ignore the cake box completely. In fact, just throw the box away as soon as you have poured out the cake mix, so you don’t make the same mistake I have. It is embarrassing how many times I have accidently baked a lemon cake instead of Sunshine Kisses. Although lemon cakes are tasty, Sunshine Kisses are better in my opinion. Carroll is known for offering students the opportunity to be a member of many different service trips. While many of them are to local venues, or various towns and cities across the United States, a particularly amazing volunteer possibility for students is through Habitat for Humanity. The next opportunity led by Jackie Clawson, assistant director of community living and community outreach coordinator, will take place this summer in Nelson, New Zealand. Clawson is a well-experienced traveler, having visited 12 countries and 41 states. She has gone through extensive training through Habitat for Humanity in order to be a team leader. Clawson has also participated in a volunteer trip to Macedonia and will soon be leading a group of volunteers to partake in a Habitat for Humanity trip to Texas over spring break. This Habitat for Humanity trip to New Zealand will undoubtedly be an incredible experience for both Clawson and the volunteers that will be joining her. The trip to New Zealand is a 15-day adventure, sure to be lled with anticipation in experiencing an entirely new culture. There will be 12 volunteers going on this trip. Diving into a completely unknown culture is something Clawson is really looking forward to. “We’ll be working to build a house, but there’s just so much more we will be actually getting out of it,” said Clawson. Volunteers will be working alongside native New Zealanders and will have the opportunity to do home stays with local families, indulge in local cuisine, and take in the new and beautiful culture around them. “The most important value of volunteering abroad is learning about the culture,” stated Clawson. “There are always so many differences but at the same time so many similarities. It kind of brings everything together for me. I’m looking forward to experiencing a huge adventure with a team I won’t meet until we all land in New Zealand. Some of that unknown is scary but so exciting. I’m also looking into extending my trip a few days to explore Australia.” Experiencing the culture is a huge advantage for Clawson and for the volunteers that will be accompanying her. Opportunities like this allow Clawson, amongst the people that will be joining her, to experience a culture from a more native perspective, instead of that of a tourist. Working side by side with the New Zealanders will give the volunteers a unique opportunity to see New Zealand from the viewpoint of those who live there. Volunteers from around the world are able to be involved in this experience. Volunteers must be 18 years old or older. For any Carroll students, staff, and faculty that are interested, Clawson encourages you to discuss the trip with her. Carroll students are given many volunteer opportunities, and this is one of the most exhilarating, fantastic, and enticing ones being offered. For more information about the trip, please contact Jackie Clawson at jclawson@carroll.edu. There is also information available online at http://habitatnewzealand.wordpress. com/2012/01/31/join-me-in-new-zealand/ for those who are interested in being involved in this opportunity. Determined, enthusiastic, and involved describe Sam Clement, a junior biology major from Great Falls. Clement has been a community advisor (CA) in Guadalupe Hall for two years and a member of the ROTC-Army program at Carroll since her rst semester. By mid-March, Clement hopes to add another activity to her agenda. Clement is organizing a women’s empowerment group on campus titled I am That Girl (IATG). The ideas, purpose, and mission surrounding this wonderful organization, as well as Clement’s excitement for IATG, are why all Carroll women should look into this new campus group. “I encourage girls to join this club to get inspired and to build a positive community with each other,” said Clement. According to Clement, IATG is “about living your life based on your passions.” She went on to state, “Everyone has those unique things that make them perfect for something; once they nd them and put them to use, that’s when the magic happens.” The IATG mission statement on its website reads, “I am That Girl is a community inspiring girls to think for themselves, speak their truth and discover their purpose.” IATG gives young women the courage they need to put their talents and passions to use in the real world. Clement was introduced to IATG last January through senior biology major Vicki Dettman of Bozeman. Dettman went to a conference where she listened to and met founder, Alexis Jones, an internationally known speaker and a nalist on CBS’s hit show Survivor. After Dettman explained what IATG was all about, Clement replied by simply saying, “I want in on that!” IATG also concentrates on rede ning beauty to empower women. A concept stressed by IATG is Bellism, which teaches that beauty is not all about looks. “It is about your faith life, inner strengths, and passions that de ne your life,” stated Clement. Serving and inspiring others is another focus of IATG. Clement says she has ideas on service projects the group could participate in, “but it’s really about the group and what the group’s passions are.” IATG has inspired Clement as a CA and as a female in ROTC. Her oor is lined with motivational quotes from strong women who lived their lives based on their passions. As a member of ROTC, Clement was informed about the Wounded Warrior Project and was motivated to organize a freshman-sophomore semi formal as a fundraiser for the project. The Wounded Warrior Project hit close to home for Clement as both her brother and cousin were wounded in combat. “It is such a worthy cause to donate your time and energy to,” said Clement. “That is where my future is; I want to serve as a doctor in the military.” As a member of the ROTC program, Clement is challenged by the educational demands of the biology department, as well as the training requirements of ROTC. Clement is one of eight women in the program of around 20. When asked if her gender has been an issue in her ROTC experience, Clement responded, “It is de nitely a man’s world, but there is a place and a need for women in it.” Clement also said, “The standards for men and women are different, especially physically. Men are held to a higher standard so it’s harder to gain the same respect.” Nevertheless, Clement was still beaming with excitement when talking about her involvement with ROTC. This summer Clement will travel to Fort Lewis, Wash. to take part in the ROTC’s Leadership Assessment Course. She will be integrated with ROTC cadets across the nation and assessed on communication, leadership, physical tness, and Army knowledge. Clement pointed out that how well you do de nitely affects where you get placed after ROTC completion. After earning a degree in biology at Carroll and completing the ROTC program, Clement plans to attend medical school to become a trauma surgeon. Clement said her goal is to be aboard the USS Hope, which is basically a huge oating hospital serving all people in need around the world. It provides day surgeries, so patients can go home right away. Clement would also like to serve people coming right out of combat working at a hospital in the war. Clement is a living example of the ideals she hopes to spread in her new women’s empowerment group I am That Girl. She is clearly living her life according to her passions and will continue to do so around the Carroll campus, and possibly around the world. 8 The Prospector Thursday, March 1, 2012 Nate Kavanagh Staff Writer Clement impacts Carroll PHOTO COURTESY OF SAM CLEMENT “Everyone has those unique things that make them perfect for something; once they fi nd them and put them to use, that’s when the magic happens.” -Sam Clement Habitat for Humanity: New Zealand Emily Halvorson Staff Writer Sam Clement CARROLL Maki My role as Chairman of Carroll’s Board of Trustees began a few months ago, but my personal connection to Carroll College dates back to 1965. In the summer of that year, our family arrived in Helena where my father began his 25-year association with Carroll as a Professor of English. My childhood memories include varied images of Carroll—whether attending Saints football games at Vigilante Stadium, shooting hoops at the P.E. Center, or occasionally dropping by Dad’s of ce in O’Connell Hall. The most endearing memories and lasting in uences were, of course, the people. Dad and his buddies from Carroll enjoyed escaping the halls of academia for periodic Friday night poker gatherings. When Dad’s turn to host rolled around, our expansive dining room table was surrounded by the likes of Al Murray, Guido Bugni, Tom Stuart, Bill Huber, Tom Kelly, and Father Bill Greytak. (Away from the card table, Dad’s friends also included John Downs, Hank Burgess and Jim Manion, among others.) I would fall asleep to the smell of tobacco smoke and the sounds of comfortable conversation accompanied by the percussion of plastic poker chips being thrown into the pot. Inevitably I would awake to raucous laughter and shouts of glee and despair as an unexpected hand was revealed downstairs; Al Murray’s booming voice and unchecked mirth were particularly memorable. I graduated from Carroll in 1982 after having taken classes from several of those legends and a number of other exceptional professors and mentors. Four of my ve brothers and sisters attended or graduated from Carroll. My wife Rosemary (Walsh) graduated from Carroll, as did her mother and two of her siblings. Our son John graduated from Carroll in 2008, our daughter Katie graduated from Carroll in 2010, and we’re reasonably con dent our son Kevin will graduate from Carroll in May. (Kevin, if you’re reading this, please call home to con rm that you will indeed be graduating this spring.) Even our 18 year old daughter Meghan, who has not yet selected a college, has resided on campus for sports camps and Montana Girls State. Clearly, our family didn’t fully comprehend that the term “the Carroll family” was meant to be a gurative one. My multi-generational connection to Carroll provides a unique and valuable perspective. During and after my student years at Carroll, I came to realize that Dad and his friends weren’t just card-playing, shing, and handball court companions. They were Carroll’s old guard; they were the great ones. But here’s the wonderful thing about experiencing Carroll College anew through my children and my role on the Board: Carroll’s great ones continue to this day. The names and faces are different, but Carroll continues to be blessed with faculty and staff members who are incredibly talented, committed and caring. They continue to share their gifts with our amazing students in ways that are shaping young lives in profound and powerful ways. I know this to be true because I see it in my own children. I see the in uence of Carroll’s vibrant Catholic faith in my oldest son’s decision to commit a year of his life to the Jesuit Volunteer Corps, serving the least among us in a homeless shelter in Spokane. I see the depth of Carroll’s academic excellence in my daughter’s ability to secure a prestigious research fellowship with the National Institutes of Health, followed by her acceptance to the highly selective PhD program in Microbiology at the University of Washington. And I see the truth of Carroll’s commitment to service and social justice in my youngest son’s two trips to Guatemala with Engineers Without Borders to work on a water system and structural improvements to Father Hazelton’s school. My perspectives are enhanced and expanded by those of the other members of our accomplished and dedicated Board of Trustees. Together, we are committed to doing all we can to help Carroll realize its full potential. Those of us who are closest to Carroll know of its special spirit and distinctive attributes. We know that Carroll represents the intersection of academic strength, liberal arts and pre-professional programs, Catholic faith, athletic and extracurricular success, student and faculty accomplishment, and a deeply-felt service ethic. We know that these attributes—permeated by a sense of family and placed on a beautiful campus in a stunning outdoor setting—resonate with prospective students, alumni and friends. Our collective challenge and opportunity is to more effectively articulate and build on these strengths to increase enrollment and expand donor giving. Doing so will not only favorably impact the college with the resources to more fully reach our shared objectives; it will enable more students and their families to be touched by a life-altering experience at Carroll. As we strive to make Carroll a better and stronger institution, we will also seek to enhance our sense of community. We will be intentional about nding opportunities for social and constructive engagement among trustees, faculty, staff, alumni and students. One of the most positive byproducts of our President Search Committee is that it provided an opportunity for all of these constituencies to work side-by-side and experience the quality, mutual respect, and values shared by all. We will seek similar opportunities to exchange perspectives and ideas, recognizing that we are all in this together, af rming that the whole is indeed more than the sum of the parts. Finally, we will join the entire Carroll community in welcoming and supporting our new president, Dr. Tom Evans. Tom brings a dynamic leadership style, an engaging personality, and a breadth of knowledge in higher education that will create excitement and opportunities for Carroll in the months and years ahead. He is blessed to begin his work from the strong foundation that has been built under the leadership of Dr. Tom Trebon, and he is fortunate to be joining an outstanding team of professionals. But Dr. Evans will need the prayers and support of all of us to realize the success we know he is capable of achieving as Carroll’s next president. This is certainly a time of change for Carroll College. But from my vantage point and those of my colleagues on the Board, it is a very positive and exciting time. Thanks to the dedication and hard work of so many, the future for Carroll has never been brighter. The Carroll family is strong. Thursday, March 1, 2012 The Prospector 9 Mark Semmens Chairman, Carroll Board of Trustees PHOTO BY GARY MARSHALL The Carroll community has been blessed with the return of the beautiful, meaningful Hoff Chalice to campus Masses. The original owner of this majestic chalice was Monsignor Norbert Casper Hoff, a former president of Carroll College and namesake of the Hoff- Kavanagh room in the Upper Campus Center. Hoff owned and used this ornate chalice from 1914 until his death in 1956; his presidency at Carroll was from 1920- 1932. Hoff willed the chalice to John Redman who continued to use the magni cent chalice throughout his priesthood. The chalice remained on the Carroll campus as Redman was a tenured member of the Carroll mathematics department from 1959-1979. Redman donated the chalice to Carroll College to be admired by the Carroll community and utilized during Mass. The visible beauty of the Hoff Chalice is due to the etchings and inscriptions all around it. The Annunciation, Nativity, Prophecy of Simeion, Flight into Egypt, Jesus Teaching in the Temple, and Angel Ministering to Jesus in the Garden are all elaborately depicted in silver around the gold cup. The letters J-E-S-U-S are etched around the node on the center of the stem of the chalice. Six more scenes are etched round the base of the Hoff Chalice: Jesus is Condemned to Death, the Crowning with Thorns, the Meeting of Jesus and Mary on the Way of the Cross, the Cruci xion, the Burial of Jesus, and the Resurrection of Jesus. Another aspect of the chalice’s beauty is its symbolism of the Church’s stability. At nearly one hundred years old, the Hoff Chalice has been through countless community, state, national, and world crises. The Hoff Chalice has returned to Carroll and is truly a beautiful addition to Mass on campus. Like father like son: A Carroll family legacy Nate Kavanagh Staff Writer PHOTO BY GARY MARSHALL Hoff Chalice returns to Carroll Mark Semmens ing a Difference “This is certainly a time of change for Carroll College. But from my vantage point and those of my colleagues on the Board, it is a very positive and exciting time .” -Mark Semmens Father Marc with the Hoff Chalice The Saint’s women’s basketball team nished off their regular season over the last weekend. They ended their season on a high note with two stirring victories at the Carroll P.E. Center. The women Saints issued a nal stirring performance Saturday, February 25 with a 77-69 victory over Montana Western in overtime. Jordan Bagley, a freshman for-ward, hit a buzzer-beating layup that sent the game into extra minutes. From there, the Carroll team dominated the overtime period 13-5 and celebrated a night to never forget. Led by Torrie Cahill, who poured in 17 points, the Saints held off a furious run by Montana Tech on Thursday, February 23 to win 51-47. Cahill iced the game with two clutch free throws with six seconds left to put the game out of reach. It was a special way to end the regular season, and it allowed the seniors to end their nal game at home the right way. It was a game that the team desperately needed to win, not only in order to honor seniors, Jeni Guertin, Alysha Green, Jill Jagelski, and Amy Allen, but also to provide much needed momentum heading into the Frontier Conference Tournament. “I couldn’t ask for a better senior class. You only get one rst-ever senior class, and I feel honored to have had this one for my rst one,” remarked Coach Sayers when asked about her seniors. “They have changed the culture of what is expected here and what it means to be a member of the Carroll College women’s basketball team.” Bailey Snelling, a freshman and an ob-vious bright spot for the future of the pro-gram, led the way with 30 points. Kalee Junkermier added 13, and Cahill netted 9. The beginning of the game was certainly emotional given that it was Senior Night, but also because of senior Alysha Green. Green’s Carroll career was cut short by an ACL tear, but her remarkable contribu-tions to the team were not overlooked and will not be forgotten. Green took the oor with her other senior teammates at the beginning of the game and Guertin then swiped the open-ing tip out of bounds. This allowed Green to be given her well-deserved credit and moment while not threatening further injury. It was apparently a pre-meditated decision that was planned by Hayley Pettit, a former Carroll player and now all-conference center for the Bulldogs and the Western coaching staff. Green left the oor to a raucous standing ovation that re ected an illustrious Carroll basketball career. Credit is due to the Western bas-ketball team and staff for their class act. Before the two magical nights, the Car-roll team had been struggling to nd ways to win. They had been winless in February thanks in part to a tough schedule that pit-ted them against two highly ranked Fron-tier Conference teams, Lewis-Clark State and Westminster, back-to-back. They lost on Thursday, February 9 to Lewis-Clark State by a score of 50-67 despite 17 points and 3 assists from Cahill. Two days later, they had a rough night losing by a consid-erable margin 47-70 against Westminster. Heading into President’s Day weekend on February 17 and 18, the team battled hard but fell 41-52 and 48-55, respectively. The beauty of the Frontier Conference Tournament, however, is that it can offer struggling teams a fresh start. Yes, the women’s basketball team only boasts a 5- 9 Frontier Conference record, but that no longer matters come playoff time. “I think that when tourney times come around, it is a whole new season,” said Coach Sayers. “You have to put together 3 good games.” In the end, anything can happen. No matter what transpired during the regular season, all it takes is three good games to get an automatic berth to the national championships. Carroll must win the tournament to have any chance of going to Kentucky for the 32nd Annual NAIA Division I Women’s Basketball National Championship on March 14-20. But don’t tell this team that it isn’t possible. “Teams do one of two things, they are tired and want it over, or they begin to peak and realize that they have just as much chance as anyone else,” said Coach Sayers. “I don’t foresee our team not ghting or quitting. It’s just not them.” Sports The Carroll cheer squad is an active, lively group of girls who demonstrate school spirit and help to amp up the crowd during various athletic events. The squad works diligently to prepare routines to impress the crowd and illustrate their hard work as a team. One example of their more complex routines is their halftime show called Going Gaga for Saints. Their entire routine is choreographed strictly to Lady Gaga songs. Leading the cheer squad are seniors Katrina Seipp and Anni Freier. When asked why she loves being a member of Carroll cheer, Katrina Seipp, a senior community health major and international relations minor from Clancy, Mont., stated, “It is so fun to see every-thing that can be accomplished by the team. With such a long season, we be-come a unit that works well together and feeds off each others’ energy to create new ideas for stunts and dances.” Anni Freier, a senior nursing major from Havre, Mont., commented on their upcoming halftime routine, stating, “Our halftime routine is something that we work on months in advance until the nal performance. It is the one and only time that everyone is watching us and acknowl-edging the hard work that we do. It’s a lot of work putting it together because it in-volves two dances, a kick line, two stunts and some jumps and basket tosses, as well. Each year, we have a sort of theme and we wanted to do something that hadn't been done before, so we are doing Going Gaga for the Saints! Hence, all the Lady Gaga music!” When asked about her captains, junior Stephanie Lundquist had nothing but kind words to say. “Annie is a strong leader when it comes to stunting, and she explains things well and always has new ideas,” says Lundquist, an elementary education major and special education mi-nor, from Bellevue, Wash. Lundquist goes on to comment, “Katrina is very creative in her choreography and takes our sugges-tions when we work together on creating dance routines.” Both Freier and Seipp remarked that they will miss being a member of the Car-roll cheer squad. Seipp commented, “After four years on the team, it is going to be really different having my weekends free. I have become really used to seeing these girls almost every day, and I know I'll miss all of our silly antics.” Freier agreed, stating, “What I will miss most is the girls that I've grown so close to. I have made a lot of really good friends through cheer, and it’s going to be hard not seeing them at least three times a week. I am also going to miss the football games which were always so much fun to watch and cheer at.” Both Seipp and Freier are valuable members of the Carroll cheer squad and will de nitely be missed next season! PHOTO BY GARY MARSHALL Cheer Squad 10 The Prospector Thursday, March 1, 2012 Carroll cheer goes Gaga Emily Halvorson Staff Writer PHOTO BY GARY MARSHALL Women's Basketball team Saints tame the Bulldogs Brandon Saiki Staff Writer The Saint’s men’s basketball regular season didn’t end quite as planned. Still, there is a lot to look forward to as the Frontier Conference Tournament looms. Toward the end of February, the team began to show much more consistent play. Even though, they went 4-3 through the nal month of the regular season, they lost three games by only an average of 6.3 points and climbed their way to the fourth seed in the tourna-ment. In the nal two games of the regular season, the men’s basketball team played valiantly. On Senior Night, in front of a packed house at the P.E. Center, the Saints fought hard against the eventual Co-Frontier Conference Champions, Montana Western. Unfortunately, they simply didn’t shoot well enough from the oor to get the opportuni-ties they needed to win. Carroll did keep the game close thanks to an impressive 13 for 13 from the free throw line. Nevertheless, Montana Western was able to close out the game. Chris McGrath, Carroll’s sopho-more guard, led the way for the Saints with 17 points. Both Ben Cutler and Tony Dalton added 12 points with Andy Gar-land sti ed for only 11. The night, in the end, belonged to the Montana Western Bulldogs on the score-board, but for Carroll fans, it was about the seniors. Tony Dalton, Chase Godecke, and Andy Garland were honored for their service and contributions to the team. “The leadership of our seniors this sea-son has been amazing, said Coach Veltri. "They walk the walk on the court as well as in the classroom." He noted that Andy Garland and Tony Dalton earned Academic All-American Honors for the season. Against Montana Tech on Thurs-day, February 23, the Saints held of the Orediggers behind 17 points and 3 assists from Garland. On President’s Day weekend, they headed to the road and beat Great Falls 63-56 with Cutler leading the way with 22 points. The following day, they played Montana State Northern tough, but fell 71- 79 despite Garland scoring 32 points, one shy of his season game high, and Cutler adding another 22. They took on Lewis-Clark State Col-lege and Westminster College at home on Thursday, February 9 and Saturday, Feb-ruary 11, respectively. Lewis-Clark State nipped Carroll by a score of 64-66 despite a strong 28-point effort from Garland. Two nights later, they stood off Westmin-ster by a score of 74-65, thanks again to Garland who scored 26 and Cutler netting 20. They started off the month well with a solid 78-70 victory at home against Rocky Mountain College on Friday, Febru-ary 3. Two players scored more than 20 points with Ben Cutler scoring 24 and Andy Garland adding 21. Tony Dalton ended just short of 20 with 19 points. No matter what happens in the Frontier Conference Tournament, Garland will end his college career as one of the most decorated Carroll men’s basketball student athletes of all time. In compiling 463 points over the course of his senior regular season, he has amassed a career total of 1,954 points ranking him as second all-time, behind only Bill Pilgeram. With 46 points in the tournament, he could join Pilgeram as the only Carroll player to ever score 2,000 points. When Garland was asked about becom-ing Carroll’s 2nd All-Time leading scorer, he acknowledged how meaningful it was to him because of the great former players and tradition of Carroll basketball, but he was quick to add that no player can do it alone. “I owe a lot of the success to my team-mates… they put me in a lot of good situa-tions to succeed and make plays,” said Garland. When Coach Veltri was asked about Garland, he had nothing, but praise for his star forward: “Andy is the hardest working player in our program, he ap-proaches every day with the mindset that he can improve. He is extremely tough both physically as well as mentally, and he never cuts corners. It will be a long time before we see a career as impressive as Andy’s in the Frontier Conference.” Cutler added that he has always looked up to Garland and that he has taught him a lot about basketball and life. The bottom line for Cutler, “Andy is not only a great basketball player, but a great person also.” One of the great elements to Garland is that for as good of player as he is, he remains humble and de ects praise to the rest of his teammates and coaches. “Everyone has been making a lot of nice contributions throughout the year,” said Garland. He especially acknowledged Cutler who he said “has been playing extremely well for us and has been the difference maker in many of our games.” There’s no question that Garland generally gets most of the attention from opponents, but Cutler has proven that he is a force himself. “Ben Cutler has been as impressive dur-ing conference play as any guard that has ever played here at Carroll,” said Coach Veltri. In the end, this team still has a lot to play for. The tournament is coming around and that means a fresh slate. “The way this season has gone thus far I think proves that there are several teams capable of winning the FC tournament, in-cluding the Saints. We are playing our best basketball of the season right now, and that’s right where you want to be heading into the post-season,” said Coach Veltri. Like the women’s basketball team, the men will need to run the table in the Fron-tier Conference Tournament to qualify for an automatic berth to the 75th Annual NAIA Division I Basketball National Championships on March 14-20 in Kansas City, Mo. We wish them the best of luck and hope they’re still playing basketball by the time this story hits the stands. Go Saints! The Carroll College indoor track and eld team is winding down its second full year of competition. For many programs, a second year would be simply a build-ing block for the future, a chance to give athletes an opportunity to garner more col-legiate experience and allow the coaches to nd a niche in the high-stakes recruiting game. But this is not an ordinary team, nor do they have an ordinary coach. So what has been the key to the track team’s success this year? Well, like any team sport, it starts with leadership. Coach Morris has continued to earn the buy-in of his cross-country and track athletes. “He has been a huge in uence on my work ethic and determination to be the best athlete I can be,” said William Roche. William also pointed to the fact that last year’s team was composed primarily of freshman. This year, with the addition of some upperclassmen transfers and the development of some younger athletes, he has seen a greater number of athletes take on leadership roles. Together, they have become accountable for the direction and future of the program. Recruiting has also been important for the development of this team. The recruit-ment of transfers, Easton Padden, Taylor Peliska, Brandan Haggerty, and Kathleen Mulligan, have bolstered a strong return-ing core of track athletes such as Troy Solly, Rhianna Grossman, and William Roche. The result? The competition is greater than ever, and some of these student athletes are performing earlier and better than anticipated. A number of these athletes are perform-ing at such a high level that they will have the opportunity to compete for a national championship. “Thirteen athletes in all are going, six men and seven women,” said Coach Mor-ris. They will represent our college at the NAIA Indoor Track & Field Na-tional Championships in Geneva, Ohio on March 1 through March 3. But the team has no intention of just enjoying the expe-rience. Troy Solly noted that the team has “high expectations for indoor nationals.” Given the success of the team this year, it is not hard to understand why. Easton Padden currently ranks 2nd in the nation in the pole vault, while Rhi-anna Grossman ranks 5th in the 3000m. Rhianna continues to be a strong leader and noted that she’s ready to compete come March. Meanwhile, Kathleen Mul-ligan ranks 6th in the Triple Jump. The women’s distance medley relay, composed of Shanna Burke, Latecia Howell, Brianna Eaton, Rhianna Grossman, and Ariel Murtagh, is ranked 12th in the country and gures to be a dark horse at nationals. Lastly, the men’s 4 x 800m relay gures to be strong. Ranked 3rd in the nation, the relay team is composed of Austin Stuchell, Taylor Peliska, Troy Solly, Ben Vaughan, and William Roche. All in all, this is a team that continues to be on the rise. A number of these athletes have the potential to be All-Americans, and Roche commented that this team has a long-term goal of being “the best track and eld team in the state.” But that kind of distinction isn’t just handed out. Especially with the University of Montana and Montana State continuing to build strong programs. Yet, with the hard work, commitment, and dedication of these student athletes, coupled with the skill and expertise of Coach Morris, this goal may not be all that unrealistic. Be sure to wish good luck to our 13 indoor track athletes heading to nationals in March. Represent us well! Thursday, March 1, 2012 The Prospector 11 Carroll track and field gear up for Nationals Sports Garland nears 2000 points “The leadership of our seniors this season has been amazing. They walk the walk on the court as well as in the classroom.” -Coach Veltri PHOTO BY GARY MARSHALL Brandon Saiki Staff Writer Brandon Saiki Staff Writer Chris McGrath If you missed the 2012 spring theatre production, consider yourself at a loss. Lend Me a Tenor by Ken Ludwig, directed by Carroll Alum, John Rausch was a campus hit, lled with many tears—tears of laughter of course! This show was a farce about a famous tenor who was believed to be dead, and the confusion that erupted when a less quali ed man tried to cover for him. The eight cast members did not leave one second of acting unaccompanied by laughter and attention gripping turns of events. “This is a very bright group of people who worked exceptionally hard,” Rausch said, who is back to direct for the rst time since 1991. Since graduation, he has acted in six Carroll productions and decided it was time to take a directing role this time around. The comedy was brought to life by the cast who all brought their personalities to their roles. “It really stretched a different acting muscle in me”, Sabrina Harding who played Julia said. “Working on a comedy with these people was fun because we are all already so funny anyways.” Hard work and countless hours put in by the cast and crew was obvious by the elaborate set, suiting costumes, and the perfection of the slightest gestures, expressions, and action. “Being in this show was so rewarding, it is great to be back in theatre since high school,” said Eric Noel a sophomore biol-ogy major from Albuquerque, N.M. Noel, playing the lead role of Max, was active on stage throwing, catching, sing-ing, and caught being just a little bit risk-ay along with many of his cast members. With eight shows between February 16th and 26th, the students put in many hours, not to mention the six weeks prior, consisting of almost nightly rehearsal. “I have never done a comedy play,” said Vivian Cole, a freshman Colorado Springs, Colo. native, who played Maggie. “I really like this cast; we’ve got great cast dynamics.” Thoroughly impressed would be an understatement for this upbeat and hi-larious show that was brought to Carroll for the rst time. Reviews 12 The Prospector Thursday, March 1, 2012 "Lend Me a Tenor" leaves tears of laughter People sometimes tell me “Erin, you’re a music freak,” and sometimes I have to agree with them, but playing four instruments isn’t that bad right? Well, as I like to say music is life, and I am a rm believer in that. We all have our moments where we just want nothing better to do than to lay in bed and read a book while listening to our favorite pop artist, or do a little dancing to our favorite country song, or for those of us that really like to let go, let your hair down and head bang to our favorite rock artist. Then again some may nd that only certain genre’s appeal to them, or only a certain artist. Everyone has their favorites. Personally I love listening to Evanescence any time of the day, no matter what the circumstances are. Now, obviously I cannot speak for everyone, however I do know that we all love our music. Music shows passion, whether that passion is in a love song, a breakup song, or simply a “screw this” song, everyone can relate to at least one song in their lives. I’ve heard from a lot of people that they are fans of many different genres, but a common answer is that it depends on the mood. What’s in a mood? Depending on mood some will listen to bands such as Trading Yesterday for their melancholy chords, or Lady Gaga for her fun and upbeat tunes. The link between mood and music, in my opinion, is very strong. As I said earlier music is passion, and there’s nothing like listening to someone who wrote passionately of being herself. Jaci Velásquez just came out with her new album “Diamond” which was also the name of the rst song on the album. For those who like to listen to soft pop and hear someone wonderful lyrics, I recommend her new album. Jacquelyn Davette Velásquez began singing when she was very young, and has recorded several albums in the history of her music career. Her music style has a pop avor with some lovely Latin American are in a few of her songs such as “Con El Viento A Mi Favor” and “Girl,” along with many others. In her song “Diamond” Velásquez sings about a special someone who made her feel good in her own skin. Someone who could “take imperfect away, leave all that’s good in place” and ll her full of love. Its slow and calm beat allows you to focus on the sweet and meaningful lyrics that give the song extra meaning. Velásquez brings very unique musical talent with her strong voice, her zealous lyrics, and her ear for hit melodies. Anyone who enjoys music that has a soft background and strong meaning will love Jaci Velásquez’ new album “Diamond.” Go check it out! Jaci Velásquez offers Latin America fl are Name of Musician: Jaci Velásquez Genre: Latin/Pop Grade: A The Prospector is now available online! Use your student ID to view from the Carroll College Student Life page. Student review ERIN JOHNSON PHOTO BY MARY HOLBROOK Name of Play: Lend Me a Tenor Genre: Comedy Grade: A Student opinion MARCIE MCCARVEL Reviews Thursday, March 1, 2012 The Prospector 13 "Elevate" "Elevate" is a documentary lm from West Africa. "Elevate" comes from the saying, “Jump as high as you can.” "Elevate" follows four young men who make the cut, receive scholarships, and head off to the United States. The lm took over four years to nish. Anne Buford is the director and the producer of the lm. Anne came to Senegal in 2005 to visit the boarding school, Seeds Academy. Seeds is located in a town called Thies, which happens to be my hometown. Anne came to visit us because she heard that it was a good program for young people who want to do a sport and receive an education. Anne decided to make a documentary about four people: Assane Sene, Aziz N’diaye, Dethie Fall, as well as myself. The purpose was to show and spread the word about Seeds Academy and its mission to help young people have the opportunity to play basketball, while continuing their education. This program also gave athletes a chance at full-ride scholarships to the top prep schools in the United States. With a combination of skill and dedication athletes can earn a great education. Anne followed us for over four years. She came to see us almost every two months. Being lmed and recorded was very dif cult for us to get used to. It seemed we rarely had private time to ourselves because Anne wanted to record all our activities, especially with our team. "Elevate" is a movie that reminds me of the good and the bad moments of my life. I was only a 16-year-old guy living in Senegal. The lm shows the times of sadness I experienced where I leaned on the support of my family, especially my mother. It also shows the good memories and the fun that I had with my family and friends. "Elevate" came to the United States in 2011, and began showing in New York, Texas, California, Oklahoma, Alabama, and Illinois. "Elevate" won the award for rst movie of the year at the Dallas Festival in Dallas, Texas. "Elevate" is a lm that shows the transition of the four young Muslim men from their past life to their present achievements. Name of Movie: Elevate Genre: Documentary Grade: A "The Vow" reminds that true love does exist Student review BYAGO DIOUF It is sad, in today’s society, that so little love seems to resist the test of time; there are so few examples of true, strong love in the world, that we sometimes forget its existence. Finally, however, a lm has emerged which can provide us with the evidence we need to believe in true love, dedication, and a promises which stand the tests and tribulations of time. Based entirely on true events, The Vow, starring Rachel McAdams (The Notebook, Sherlock Holmes) and Channing Tatum (Dear John, 21 Jump Street), tells the story of husband and wife Leo and Paige who are madly in love and crazy for one another. One wintry evening, the couple is rear-ended by a dump truck, and Paige is thrown through the windshield, hitting her head and losing her memory, namely, the ve happy years she has spent with Leo. Leo is faced with the challenge of helping his wife fall back in love with him, helping her to remember who she was when they met, and who she has worked so hard to become. But nothing is easy. Paige’s nal memories involve her engagement to another man, and the pursuit of a law degree provided by her wealthy family. A family who desires Leo’s absence from Paige’s life. Leo is ultimately faced with the decision of whether or not staying with Paige, and helping her to remember him, is worth the trials he is forced to put himself through. And the decision may surprise you. While I am not the most critical of movie-goers, I still have to stress that I found this lm very well done. Tatum and McAdams have proven in past movies to be the stars of dramatic romances, and their portrayals of a desperate husband and his now-distant wife are poignant and perfect. I promise that you will nd yourself tearing up at least once in the course of your visit to the theater; I myself spent the better part of the second half wiping my eyes with concession stand napkins. And besides the obvious presence of romantic gooey-ness, this lm is well done because it keeps the viewer guessing at the end until the credits roll. A movie in which the ending is not obvious from the start is always refreshing, and The Vow provides its viewers with that satisfaction. Ultimately, this is simply a good movie. Whether for a romantic evening with a signi cant other, or a night out with the girls, this movie will bring a pleasant touch of love and happiness to anyone’s movie-going experience. Name of Movie: The Vow Genre: Romance Grade: A Student review DANA MILLER Jump as high as you can 14 The Prospector Campus Campus Calendar Thursday, March 1, 2012 Men's Basketball Frontier Conference Tournamnent -7:30 p.m. FASSA - 8a.m. Frontier Conference Tournamnent -7:30 p.m. SPRING BREAK NAIA National Basketball Tournament The Mound Builders at Carroll Theater 7:30 p.m. ( 3p.m. Sunday March 18) Fall Class Selection 17th Annual Career Fair in PE Center 11:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. Carroll Jazz Concert 4p.m. The Mound Builders at Carroll Theater 7:30 p.m. ( 3p.m. Sunday March 24) Search Retreat. Carroll Jazz Spring Concert 7:30p.m Junior Senior Banquet Campus Housing Sign-up Wednesday, March 14 Friday, March 30 Thursday, March 22 - 24 Friday, March 2 -3 Thursday, March 1 Monday, February 5 - 9 Wednesday,March 21 Carroll Chat Angry Birds Ready. Aim. Fire. For the fi rst time, Carroll College held a life size Angry Bird competition, which took place on February 3, in the Guad lounge. Boxes with Angry Bird stuff ed animals were placed, mirroring the levels of the popular smart phone app. A large slingshot was set up, with points awarded for hitting boxes, and more points for knocking pigs off the boxes. The CSA Programming Board provided prizes for the best launchers including; an Angry Bird hat, Angry Bird gadgets, and the grand prize of an Angry Bird speaker set. Scott Forthofer, the assistant director for community living, decided it would be “a cool change to bring Angry Birds to the Carroll campus.” The estimated 40 students who decided to test their app skills in real life, agreed. The high point scorer and winner was freshman, Ryan Edens. The unique and fun campus activity turned out to be a brilliant event. Shindig Friday, February 10 marked another annual Saints Athletic Association Shindig. The event, which started in the 1980s and use to only be for men, had a big turn out, including students, alumni, booster club members, and members of the Helena community. Anyone who wanted to take part gathered in the upper cube for cocktails, dinner, and a raffl e. The cost to attend the dinner was $25. Bingo balls were sold for $100 and placed in an old keno machine. The last ball to be drawn signifi ed the winner. The $1000 prize was split between two parents of former Carroll football players, Tim Gill and Bill Porrini. Numerous cash prizes and certifi cates were also won by many attendees. “We would like to thank the people who participate in our Shindig and all of our other fundraisers,” said Renee Wall, associate athletic director. “We could not do what we do without them.” The money raised goes to the SAA which gives money to athletic scholarships and funds programs. Senior basketball player Andy Garland and sophomore soccer player Macky Dennis along with coaches spoke about the importance of the SAA in their academic careers. Career Fair Freshmen can explore career options and learn about what employers want, sophomores and juniors can network for good summer jobs and internships. Seniors can job hunt for that fi rst professional job. Career Fairs are for ALL students! For information on how to prepare, what to expect and which businesses will attend, go to www.helenair/careerfair. Locally Owned & Operated. LOCATED IN THE LUNDY SHOPPING CENTER Store Hours: Open 24 Hours a Day 7 Days a Week ◆ ATM ◆ Money Orders ◆ Fax ◆ Postage ◆ Western Union ◆ Lotto ◆ Bakery ◆ Deli ◆ Meat ◆ Produce Thursday, March 15 - 18 Saturday, March 31 Friday, March 23 - 25 The Prospector 15 Extras PISCES (FEB. 19- MARCH 20): Don’t let pragmatism get you down. Your ability to dream sets you apart and will pave your path to greatness. ARIES (MARCH 21- APRIL 19): Need a break from the books? Channel your inner Shaun White and head for the slopes. TAURUS (APRIL 20- MAY 20): Don’t let your stubbornness get in the way of compromise. Allow yourself to see the situation from all sides. GEMINI (MAY 21- JUNE 21): Enjoy your upcoming week of freedom. Grab a friend and hop in a car for a much-needed road trip. CANCER (JUNE 22- JULY 22): Generosity is one of your best traits, but don’t overcommit yourself. Make sure to enjoy some me time. LEO (JULY 23- AUG. 22): Your confi dent nature is a great strength, but be careful not to mistake arrogance for confi dence. SCORPIO (OCT. 24- NOV. 21): Throw your hat in the ring, and exercise your debate skills by indulging your friends in a meaningful discussion. SAGITTARIUS (NOV. 22-DEC. 21): Infect those around you with your optimism by sharing a simple word of kindness or fl ashing your brilliant smile. CAPRICORN (DEC. 22- JAN. 19): Remember, nobody’s perfect, not even you. Embrace your fl aws and revel in your individuality. AQUARIUS (JAN. 20-FEB. 18): Use your gift of gab to spread the word about a cause dear to your heart or to help out a neighbor. VIRGO (AUG. 23- SEPT. 22): Leap before you look for once. Try something new without considering all the angles fi rst. LIBRA (SEPT. 23-OCT. 23): Let someone else take the lead for a change. Explore your ability to follow another’s direction. Created by: Mary Currin Thursday, March 1, 2012 SNAPSHOTS "If god was small enough for my mind, he would not be big enough for my needs." -Amy Reager, Great Falls, junior, chemistry "I like my chicken fried, cold ...oh wait it's a dry campus." -Rob Brenteson, Conrad, Mont., sophomore, biology "Coffee! You can sleep when you're dead!." -Sam Cotnoir, Missoula, sophomore, pre- physical therapy An old Irish saying goes like this: “May the luck of the Irish enfold you… May the blessings of Saint Patrick behold you.” A quick history of St. Patrick’s Day: March 17, approximately 460 A.D., is the date that St. Patrick is said to have died; thus bringing about the beloved holiday, St. Patrick’s Day. St. Patrick was taken into captivity where he became closer to God and received visions. After he was released from captivity, he preached Christianity throughout Ireland. He used the shamrock in order to explain the Holy Trinity to the citizens of Ireland. St. Patrick is one of the more commonly recognized saints, and his feast day is by far one of the most heavily celebrated. This St. Patrick’s Day, a trip to Butte is not necessary in order to celebrate and show off some Irish pride. Helena has its own festivities to offer. Whether you are Irish, or simply want an excuse for a good time, as well as some Irish luck to rub off on you, Helena will not disappoint. Carly Garrison, a sophomore communications major or Helena says that “many restaurants around town serve Irish dishes, which is fun..I like to go to Riley’s Pub and listen to Irish music and eat a traditional Irish meal.” Riley’s Pub, located in downtown Helena is one of the hot spots on this Irish holiday. The pub has festivities planned for the holiday that include live music. The city of Helena also has the running of the leprechauns as well as a parade to celebrate St. Patty’s day. The running of the leprechauns will begin at 11 a.m. and will end at noon. The running of the leprechauns is a 3k walk/run that starts in the walking mall. Participants will be given a hat, beard, and vest to wear. The St. Patrick’s Day Parade will begin at noon in downtown Helena and will end at one. This St. Patty’s day keep it local and rejoice in the holiday, as well as the strong Irish heritage within this community. Don’t forget to wear green, and embrace the luck o’ the Irish in Helena. PHOTO BY GARY MARSHALL St. Patty's Day Aimee Ciez Staff Writer The Green Honors Society (GHS) was developed in 2011 to promote sustainable environmental prac-tices, service to the community, and academic excellence. The society fosters the conservation and protection of natural resources on campus and in the Helena com-munity. It also offers its members the opportunity to take a proactive role in reducing their own carbon footprint on the earth. The “Go Green” revolution is all around us – in the news, on campus, in politics, and in technology. With our natural resources continuing to dwindle and demand remaining at an all-time high, we have a responsibility now more than ever to be stewards of the envi-ronment. The GHS provides its members and the Car-roll College campus the tools and training to create a cul-ture of con-servation. Through a three-pronged commitment to habits, service, and education, we can take an active and neces-sary role in learning and caring for the resources with which we have been entrusted. We are currently recruiting freshman and sophomores to join our society. A Green Honors student may be pursuing any major offered at Carroll College; it is not limited to someone with a focus in natural sciences. The only prereq-uisite is to value the natural resources that we have been entrusted with, and be willing to learn and care for those resources. Juniors and seniors are more than welcome to participate in our projects and our mission, but likely would not have time left in their Carroll career to complete all of the as-pects of the society and graduate with honors at the annual convocation. Nevertheless, through participation in the program, students will get the opportunity to learn more about cur-rent environmental issues facing our country, the history of environmental-ism, as well as tackle ethical dilemmas as it relates to environmental philoso-phy or thought. Students will also implement habits into daily life, which will help them to have a sustainable livelihood. By making a commitment to actively par-ticipating in lifestyle changes, Green Honors students can develop a better understanding of how a single indi-vidual can enact change in themselves, and consequently, their community. By incorporating environmentally friendly, resource-sustaining habits, an individual develops routines that positively impact society and the envi-ronment, while eliminating waste. These habit changes can be as sim-ple as changing regular light bulbs to compact uorescent bulbs. By making a commitment to using light bulbs that have the ENERGY STAR seal of ap-proval, an individual can help mitigate and reduce greenhouse gases and over-all fossil fuel use. Yes, compact uorescent light bulbs are more expensive, but they also last longer than their counterpart. Furthermore, think about this statistic… the ENERGY STAR website states that, “If every house-hold in the United States replaced just one light with an ENERGY STAR compact uorescent light bulb, the energy saved could light 3 million homes for one year, save about $600 million in energy costs per year, and prevent 9 billion pounds of greenhouse gas emissions in a single year.” This is a perfect example about how living a greener life does not have to be dif cult, nor does it need to be burdensome. How long does it take to change a light bulb? How long does it take to power down a laptop at night? How dif cult is it to turn off the lights when leaving the room? These are simple, easy ways to make changes that over time will have a signi cant impact on the environment and even on your electric bill. Still not convinced to join the pro-gram? Well let us talk a bit more about what it entails. Because the Green Honors Society is committed to devel-oping one’s sense of social responsibil-ity, all students will demonstrate active involvement in community service projects, ful lling the service compo-nent of Green Honors. There are many ways to ful ll these service hours such as by participating in a recycling drive, adopting a Helena street, or teaching children to be responsible caretakers of the environment. Like any other honors society, the GHS also requires that you further your academic education both inside and outside the classroom. There are ve classes that students must com-plete over their time at Carroll to ful ll the academic component. Currently, the society does not have a GPA re-quirement, but students are expected to pass all of the required classes and be in good academic standing. The Green Honors membership selects classes that will allow each student to obtain a diverse perspective of how to look at the environment from a well-rounded education. In addition to required courses, ve in all, students must also attend lectures. Carroll College and the city of Helena host multiple lectures every semester that support environmental advocacy. Having students attend these events not only supports guest speak-ers, but also increases participation within the community. Sounds like a lot of work, doesn’t it? Well honors societies aren’t meant to be easy. Yet, what separates this honor society from those around the nation, or even on cam-pus, is that the society does not put a primary focus on academics. The GHS gives every one of its members the op-portunity to participate in a hands-on project on the Carroll College campus that will bene t not only current, but also future Carroll students, as well as people throughout the Helena commu-nity. I’m not talking about a one-day or a one-week project either. I’m talking about a sustainable and lasting project that bene ts the campus and commu-nity for the long term. As part of our capstone class, ES 201 – Environmental Practicum, students are asked to work together to create a project at Carroll College that promotes sustainability and / or environmentally friendly practices on campus or in Helena. Meeting and working with other students with similar passions helps motivate and validate the importance of sustainable living and community activism. We are very excited to announce that our rst project will be a commu-nity garden on the Carroll campus. By partnering with Sodexo, we will have the opportunity to develop produce in the greenhouse behind St. Albert’s and then later transplant what we grow into a designated plot behind the STAC. The community garden project will make the greenhouse usable year round and will promote a healthier diet and lifestyle changes. The produce will be used at Sodexo functions or meals or donated to organizations that help those in need. Future projects will be at the discretion of the membership, but include projects such as biodiesel production. Still need a bit more incentive? Being a member of GHS will allow students to do great things for their campus and for their community, as well as be a part of a distinguishing honors society that puts a primary focus on service, rather than entirely on academics. As Dr. Hokit, the faculty advisor of GHS and professor of biology in the department of natural Sciences, noted, “The Green Honors Society is the rst honors society in the nation to inte-grate science and non-science majors in an academic and service learning organization devoted to sustainable practices.” This makes the society unique, and therefore, each student’s ex-perience will be unique. Not only will students be at the forefront of develop-ing this distinctive society, they will gather ex-perience, skills, and qualities that leave them well rounded and attractive to future employers and schools. As Laura Berger, a junior English literature major of Novato, Calif., and the vice president of GHS, acknowledged, “The Green Honors Society is providing me with not only a great background in envi-ronmentalism to help further my goals in Environmental Law, but it is also giving me an opportunity and a voice in the effort to "green" the Carroll campus.” Students that complete the require-ments of the society will graduate with Carroll Green Honors and be recog-nized at graduation. If you are interested in joining the society, or in just learning more about the society, please feel free to con-tact me at bsaiki@carroll.edu or on my cellphone at (509) 230-2566. As president of the Green Honors Society, I know I share the excitement of the rest of the GHS membership in getting the community garden project off the ground, establishing a foundation of excellence, and beginning a lifetime of sustainable living and education. Our membership is growing and we don’t want you to miss your opportunity to be a part of it all. The Green Honors Society is about three words, “Habit – Service – Edu-cation.” Together they represent an integrated approach that forms the key foundations surrounding environmen-tal culture within the United States. By learning about the importance of environmental lifestyles through practicing habits, community service, and academic studies, students, and the society as a whole, promote ideas that are constantly evolving and being reas-sessed. If you have always wanted to green your community, but never knew where to go to meet like-minded stu-dents, then I invite you to join us, learn more about what we are all about, and take the next step in greening your campus and community. Back Page Brandon A. Saiki Staff Writer Honors Society If you are interested in joining the society, or in just learning more about the society, please feel free to contact me at bsaiki@carroll.edu or on my cellphone at (509) 230-2566.
dc.description.abstractStudent-produced newspaper.
dc.format.mediumapplication/pdf
dc.publisherCorette Library, Carroll College, Helena, Montana
dc.relation.ispartofThe Prospector (Carroll College Newspaper)
dc.rightsThese materials are primarily for scholarly and personal research. Their reproduction is governed by the fair use clause of the copyright act. Prior to any commercial use, written permission must be obtained from the Corette Library.
dc.sourceArchives
dc.subjectHelena (Mont.) -- Newspapers
dc.subjectCollege newspapers
dc.titleThe Prospector 2012-03-01 (v98n4)
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