Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorCahana, Jonathan
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-25T21:33:47Z
dc.date.available2019-09-25T21:33:47Z
dc.date.created2018-08-13 16:47
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifierIXTHEO-https://ixtheo.de/Record/420469486
dc.identifier.doi10.1163/15685276-12341340
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12424/517222
dc.description.abstractThe androgyne, whether as a symbol, a concept, or a bodily reality, appears to be employed in different and sometimes apparently contradictory ways within gnostic discourse. On the one hand, the heavenly father himself is an androgyne (Holy Book of the Great Invisible Spirit 51–52); the divine Barbelo, herself, is a “mother-father” and a “thrice-named androgyne” (Apocryphon of John 12.1–8), and Adam can only long for his ungendered days, when s/he was higher than the creator god (Apocalypse of Adam 64.5–65.25). On the other hand, we also learn that Ialdabaoth himself, that same evil material creator, the most abject entity in gnostic myth, is also an androgyne (Hypostasis of the Archons 94.8–19). This apparent discrepancy serves as the focal point of this paper, which aims to explain the complex, albeit largely consistent, use of the concept of the queered gender in gnostic myth. By reading this myth according to its internal order of events, I attempt to show that gnostic androgyny, far from being a ratification of Greco-Roman discourse (as has been sometimes suggested), is actually a subversion of this very discourse, constructed so as to reify the gnostic disapproval of an important Greco-Roman cultural premise — one that has been aptly defined by David Halperin as “the ancients’ deeply felt and somewhat anxiously defended sense of congruence between a person’s gender, sexual practices, and social identity” (1990:23).
dc.format.extentPages: Online-Ressource
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofUniversity Library Tübingen / Index Theologicus
dc.rightsAll rights reserved
dc.sourceNumen
dc.subjectEarly Christianity -- Gnosticism -- androgyne -- gender -- sexuality -- queer
dc.titleAndrogyne or Undrogyne?: Queering the Gnostic Myth
dc.typeArticle
dc.source.volume61
dc.source.issue5/6
dc.source.beginpageS. 509
dc.source.endpage524
dcterms.accessRightsopen access
ge.collectioncodeFE
ge.dataimportlabelIXTHEO metadata object
ge.identifier.legacyglobethics:13902741
ge.identifier.permalinkhttps://www.globethics.net/gtl/13902741
ge.journalyear2014
ge.lastmodificationdate2018-08-13 16:47
ge.lastmodificationuseradmin@novalogix.ch (import)
ge.submissions0
ge.setnameGlobeTheoLib
ge.setspecglobetheolib
ge.linkhttps://ixtheo.de/Record/420469486


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record