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dc.contributor.authorLandman, Christina
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-25T21:55:51Z
dc.date.available2019-09-25T21:55:51Z
dc.date.created2012-02-11 20:18
dc.date.issued2011-11-25
dc.identifieroai:scholar.sun.ac.za:10019.1/19722
dc.identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10019.1/19722
dc.identifier0075-6458 (print)
dc.identifierLANDMAN, C.. Violence as development? A challenge to the church. Verbum et Ecclesia, North America, 32, nov. 2011. Available at: <http://www.ve.org.za/index.php/VE/article/view/577>. Date accessed: 11 Feb. 2012.
dc.identifier2071-0791 (online)
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12424/529840
dc.description.abstractDullstroom-Emnotweni was the site of protests against the lack of service delivery by local government in 2009. The local leadership of the Uniting Reformed Church in Southern Africa was confronted with challenges when its members got involved in acts of violence both from the side of the community and from the side of the police. Viewing itself as an asset to the community and an agent in its development towards health and wellbeing, the church was challenged by the situation in its prophetic capacity as well as in its relationship with the ‘state’. In an attempt to negotiate answers to the church’s relationship with the ‘state’ in situations of violence, the uprising in Dullstroom-Emnotweni is used as a case study, and Calvin’s notion of the church as a world-transforming agent, the views of African women theologians on nonviolence, the practical piety of local religiousness, and the memory of systems of governance as ‘evil’ are used as intertexts to define the church’s position vis-à-vis violence as an option for development. A position of caution is taken, a position in which the church retains both its political distance and its prophetic voice, remains true to its calling as an asset to community development, and condones violence cautiously when development is at stake.
dc.languageen_ZA
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherAOSIS OpenJournals
dc.rightsAuthor holds the copyrigh
dc.subjectviolence
dc.subjecthealth and wellbeing
dc.subjectrelationship
dc.subjectUniting Reformed Church
dc.subjectSouthern Africa
dc.subjectcaution
dc.subjectAfrican women theologians
dc.subjectsystems of governance
dc.subjectcommunity development
dc.subjectlocal government
dc.subjectlocal religiousness
dc.subjectagent
dc.subjectworld-transforming agent
dc.subjectDullstroom-Emnotweni
dc.subjectprophetic capacity
dc.subject2009
dc.subjectcommunity
dc.subjectsite of protests
dc.subjectCalvin
dc.subjectchurch
dc.subjectstate
dc.subjectpolice
dc.titleViolence as development? A challenge to the church
dc.typeArticle
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ge.dataimportlabelOAI metadata object
ge.identifier.legacyglobethics:4891237
ge.identifier.permalinkhttps://www.globethics.net/gtl/4891237
ge.lastmodificationdate2012-03-15 00:03
ge.submissions0
ge.oai.exportid147100
ge.oai.repositoryid3115
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ge.linkhttp://hdl.handle.net/10019.1/19722


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